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FEATURES
March 4, 1998
The most common mistake in reading aloud -- whether the reader is a 7-year-old or a 40-year-old -- is reading too fast. Read slowly enough for the child to build mental pictures of what he just heard you read. Slow down enough for the children to see the pictures in the book without feeling hurried. Reading quickly allows no time for the reader to use vocal expression.From "The Read-Aloud Handbook", by Jim TreleasePub Date: 3/04/98
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
On Thursday afternoon, the sun-speckled benches outside Rachael Myers' first-grade classroom at Lutherville Laboratory were occupied by pairs of students, their heads bent over books, some reading aloud. Each one was reading the exact same story: "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle. A similar scene was unfolding throughout the school as the students were trying to help set a world record for the largest shared reading experience, with the most people reading a particular book on the same day. A number of schools throughout Baltimore County and the region were united in that shared goal, joining in a campaign called Read for the Record.
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NEWS
August 29, 1999
The don'ts of reading aloud are as important as the do's. Here are some things to avoid when reading with your child.* Don't start reading if there's not enough time to do it justice. Having to stop after one or two pages only serves to frustrate, rather than stimulate, your child's interest in reading.* Don't be unnerved by questions during reading time, particularly from very young children. Answer their questions patiently. Don't put them off. Don't rush your answers. There is no time limit for reading a book, but there is a time limit on a child's inquisitiveness.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 1, 2004
LONDON - A day after the detention of eight Muslims by police, leaders of the country's 2 million Muslims issued a letter yesterday calling on believers in Britain to shun extremism and political violence. The statement, signed by the secretary-general of the Muslim Council of Britain, was sent to imams, scholars and all other leaders of mosques, Islamic organizations and institutions throughout Britain. It was to be read out at the country's 1,000 mosques tomorrow. The council said the letter was in the works even before Tuesday's arrests and seizure of a half-ton of potentially explosive ammonium nitrate in the largest counter-terrorist raid in Britain since the immediate aftermath of the Sept.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | January 12, 2000
Reading aloud is the magic key that opens up the world of books for your child. One of the most widely recognized experts in the read-aloud movement is Jim Trelease, author of "The New Read-Aloud Handbook." Along with many other educators in the field of reading, Trelease recognizes that successful readers are those who have early and ongoing experiences with literature at home. Here are some of the ways to share reading with your child based upon current research: * Begin reading to your child as early as possible.
FEATURES
By Paul Kropp | March 18, 1998
For most of recorded history, reading aloud has been the norm and reading silently has been regarded as an unusual procedure. The satirist Lucian (second century A.D.) gave this advice to readers: "Look at your books with your eyes wide open...and read them aloud with great fluency, keeping your eyes in advance of your lips."St. Augustine marveled that his colleague, St. Ambrose, coulread while "his voice and tongue were at rest." Even St. Benedict, setting his rule for monks, did not require silent reading but that each monk should "do so in such a way as not to disturb anyone else."
FEATURES
May 31, 1998
So, what is the key to helping your child become a reader? In one word: reading! Research shows the most important thing parents and caregivers can do to help their children succeed in school is read aloud to them every day. Reading aloud to children also helps them:* expand their vocabularies* appreciate the value of books and reading* understand new ideas and concepts* learn about the world around them.- From "The Read - Aloud Handbook,"by Jim Trelease (Penguin, 1995)Pub date: 5/31/98
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 20, 1998
I have a necktie with a Christmas legend - the same words, over and over: "BAH HUMBUG." I have worn it, seasonally, off and on for perhaps 20 years. Many people don't notice. But those who do have always recognized the quote - its origin, who spoke it, and what it portended.Is there a more widely known pair of words in all of literature? Or a better known declaration of the spirit of Christmas? The immortality of the ultimately good Ebenezer Scrooge rests, of course, on the fact that he, like billions of others, found his spirits uplifted, his heart nourished, his faith kindled, by Christmas.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 8, 1996
There is no defense for excluding other seasons, but this is the time of year in which I most think of reading aloud - the joys that offers the reader and the read-to alike, the discoveries, the intensity, the connections of mind and heart that can enrich all involved.That, in turn, brings up poetry. People read poetry for many reasons. It is easy to forget that the most potent original and continuing element of poetry is how it sounds. What's the music of poetry when you read it silently?
NEWS
By Stephen R. Proctor and Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | December 24, 1995
Years from now, when our family gathers for the holidays, we'll remember this year as the first time we read aloud together the greatest of seasonal classics - Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol."The reading was such a hit - an experience so much richer than our annual reunions with Charlie Brown and Rudolph, Frosty and the Grinch - that it is sure to become a favorite ritual.I confess, though, that I approached the reading with trepidation. Dickens isn't easy, even for adults. Who knew if young children - Bobby is 11 and Cori is 9 - would be able to decipher his archaic English, however beautifully written?
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Declaring their love for him "no matter what," John Allen Muhammad's three young children became part of the grim testimony yesterday on whether he should be sentenced to death for killings that still have no clear explanation. "Why did you do all those shooting?" Muhammad's youngest daughter, 10-year-old Taalibah, wrote in a letter read aloud in court yesterday by her mother, Mildred Muhammad. It was a bitter child-custody battle with Mildred Muhammad that prosecutors say sent the former soldier into a rage and possibly sparked last year's sniper rampage that spread terror in the Washington region.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 2003
The art of reading fiction aloud has been largely lost in this era of electronic entertainment. But once upon a time, reading aloud was an important form of pop culture. Now the Performance Workshop Theatre Company has revived this art in a series of readings of short stories written by playwrights. Judging from last weekend's double bill of Luigi Pirandello's "In Silence" and Tennessee Williams' "Portrait of a Girl in Glass," the readings, jointly titled [un]told stories, are a wonderfully rich way to spend an evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002
Putting aside the obvious and very traditional, what literary work do you urge to be read aloud on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day? Why? Clarinda Harriss is chair of the Towson University English Department. She has published three collections of poetry and contributed to scholarly works on poetry. Her work appears in many magazines. She edits and directs BrickHouse Books Inc., Maryland's oldest continuously publishing small press. "The Cherry Tree Carol" -- an anonymous song, medieval, alive and well in Appalachia and audible on any number of bluegrass or roots recordings.
NEWS
January 13, 2002
Editor's note: Today Jerdine Nolen continues her back-to-the-basics series on reading and writing. Literacy development and growth happens only in the right environment. As parents, we must do all we can to encourage our children to become lifelong readers and writers. That means we must want that for ourselves as well. A commitment to being better readers and writers enriches our own lives and makes the world a better place. Reading aloud, speaking and listening to our children all are very potent ways to stimulate literacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
Walk into my three-storied neighborhood book joint only at the risk of being struck blind by the glittering displays of Christmas books. From Truman Capote to Jimmy Carter to that pioneer of self-help, M. Scott Peck, there is no shortage of writers who have jumped at the chance to spin their versions of the meaning of Christmas. And -- at least if you're inclined to believe fulsome flap copy -- most of them run that microscopic gamut from "heart-warming" to "an instant classic." Why is my slightly maudlin, Christmas-loving heart largely unwarmed?
NEWS
June 24, 2001
The single most important thing you can do for a child is to read to him. By reading aloud with your child, you provide the sounds of written language and develop his awareness so that print and pictures make sense. This is an extremely important step in beginning literacy. Research shows that children who are read to by caregivers are more likely to read successfully on their own. TIPS * Begin by letting your child choose the books that appeal to him. * Include a variety of books -- storybooks, nonfiction, traditional folk tales and fairy tales, abstract-concept books (color, time, size)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | April 19, 2001
Author will discuss virtue of reading aloud The best-selling author of "The Read-Aloud Handbook," Jim Trelease, will appear at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis at 7 tonight to lecture on "Reading aloud: motivating children to make books into friends, not enemies." In the late '70s, while working as an artist and writer, Trelease began volunteering in classrooms. Most of the students he worked with weren't big readers, but of those who were, Trelease noticed they were in classrooms where the teachers encouraged silent reading and also read aloud daily to their classes.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
In case you've noticed the growing crowds of moms, dads and tots cramming into library children's rooms, get ready - more are on the way. At least, that's the hope of State Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick, who will unveil a statewide early-reading campaign tomorrow at the Towson branch of the Baltimore County Public Library, 320 York Road. In an effort to increase library use by parents and day-care professionals, libraries statewide are taking part in a two-year media blitz, titled "It's Never Too Early," featuring posters, billboards and radio ads, paid for with $147,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an independent federal agency.
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