Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReader
IN THE NEWS

Reader

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Coming across a reference to Steve Buttry's excellent advice for tightening stories in a 2011 post at The Buttry Diary , I was particularly struck by his remark about the failure of stories when they are written for sources rather than readers I want to talk today about some of the things implicit in that invaluable maxim, write for the reader, not the source . A reporter can write about establishing the essential balance of...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In case any of you were in suspense, I can report that Alexandra Leigh Aaronson and John Paul Lucien McIntyre were married Saturday evening in a mildly unconventional and moving ceremony at the Engineers Club on Mount Vernon Square in Baltimore. Now we're back to business. Item: Responding to the post "What we talk about when we talk about grammar," Andrew Shields wrote that he understands the inadvisability of trying to force-feed the Huddleston-Pullum  Student's Introduction to English Grammar in three weeks, but he suggests that a few sections of it might be profitably employed:  " I'm thinking of those moments in the book when H and P include 'prescriptive grammar notes.' For example, the discussion of 'not ending sentences with a preposition' is very useful.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 2012
While I understand that allowing comments on news articles is a way to engage readers and to stimulate thoughtful conversation on controversial topics, many of the comments I've read associated with articles in The Sun are irrelevant to the issues, offensive, provocative, and embarrassingly racist. I don't believe this adds to the readers' experience and it degrades the newspaper. Reader input on editorials, health stories, or political issues, may add information and allow readers to express their viewpoints, but it should be moderated for relevance and civility.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
How much do you know about the week's new events? Or the geography of the Middle East? Or Batman movies? Coleman Anderson and his partner, Andrew Schuster, are betting a few hundred thousand of their investors' dollars that whatever you know, you'll want to test yourself, and that you're willing to spend time in the pursuit on their new website: Newsup. "The goal really is to make news a more meaningful experience for folks," especially young people, said Anderson, the chief marketing officer, who is 29. The site — http://www.newsup.me — presents news about national and world events, entertainment and sports in the form of an array of brief quizzes on a particular topic.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Michael Bracco | August 17, 2011
Armed with their own artistic ingenuity, random topics and a blank canvas, combatants wage war at Super Art Fight. A rock-infused art competition, the popular SAF will hold its 11th tournament Saturday. Among the bouts: the reigning Super Art Fight champ, Michael “Spaghetti Kiss” Bracco, defending against Kelsey “Killer” Wailes (scary!). Bracco, a 32-year-old Hamilton resident, shared what's on his mind before his big artsy match. Soon, I will be waiting in a small dark area behind a stage, dressed in something excruciatingly uncomfortable, embarrassing or both.
NEWS
March 2, 2010
I apologize for my letter, "Is Obama a liar" (Readers respond, Feb. 26). There is no reason to justify writing the piece. Just because President Obama is doing something wrong, doesn't give me the right to call him a liar. I was right in pointing out the discrepancies, but I was wrong to attack him personally. Two wrongs don't make something right. Timothy Weber, Baltimore Send letters to the editor to talkback@baltimoresun.com.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 9, 2011
Every time I put out one of my mock drafts, readers tell me they think things would play out differently (chances are we'll both end up being wrong). Well, now you get a chance to play GM in my first-ever reader NFL mock draft. Here's how it works. I'll post a daily poll where you can vote to decide what the team that's on the clock should do with its pick. To keep it simple, I'll give you five options for each pick. If you think I missed somebody, let me know in the comments section.
NEWS
By Lynne Agress | September 22, 2014
Now that the school year has begun, we have many questions: Is the new Core Curriculum good or bad? What about "No Child Left Behind"? How many remedial courses should a college student be allowed to take? Letter grades versus pass/fail? The questions and ensuing discussions are endless. But what about reading? If every first grader learned to read - to read well - I believe we would see many more successful students - on all levels, as well as many more successful people as a whole.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
I read with interest the recent article on the proposed magnetic levitation train running between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore ("Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). The term, "maglev," is not an obscure high-tech term. It is, at best, something of a portmanteau like "telephone" or "Internet" and every bit as hard for the "average" person to "figure out. " The term is at least 40 years old, so I'm not sure why the "headline writer" felt it necessary to "enclose" the term in "quotes" unless he or she feels that the "majority" of the "readership" is "stupid" which may even be "true" but does not excuse The Sun for dumbing down its content to reach the "lowest common denominator.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Harried commuters will be gratified by the Maryland Public Service Commission's decision last week to require taxicabs operating in Baltimore City to install credit card-reading devices in the back seat where passengers sit. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of the year, will allow customers to just swipe a Mastercard or Visa to pay the fare rather than having to carry cash. It's a convenience riders in other cities have long enjoyed, and it has probably taken a lot of the anxiety out of hailing a cab. It's about time Baltimore caught up with the trend.
MOBILE
July 1, 2014
This site automatically adjusts its presentation according to your device. (If you're on a desktop or laptop computer, change the width of your browser window to see what the site looks like at different screen sizes.) Readers visiting our desktop site on smartphones like iPhones and Android phones and on tablet computers like iPads and Kindle Fires are automatically redirected to this smartphone- and tablet-friendly site. They can still access the desktop site by tapping the "Visit our desktop site" link in the footer.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
When, for a change of pace, I turned last week to actually good prose , a few of you suggested that I might make such an excursion a regular feature. Let's give it a try.  Here is an extract from Adam Gopnik's "The Back of the World: The Troubling Genius of G.K. Chesterton," in The New Yorker  of 7 and 14 July 2008.  The text There are two great tectonic shifts in English writing. One occurs in the early eighteenth century, when Addison and Steele begin The Spectator  and the stop-and-start of Elizabethan-Stuart prose becomes the smooth, Latinate, elegantly wrought ironic style that dominated English writing for two centuries.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Writing at the Chronicle of Higher Education 's Lingua Franca blog, Anne Curzan wonders why the succinct, gender-neutral term chair  for head of a department or committee gets scorned or disregarded.  It has, after all, been in fairly wide use in colleges, universities, and organizations over the past forty years. But resistance persists.  The Associated Press Stylebook deplores it, along with chairperson , which we can lay to the AP Stylebook 's unthinking clinging to fusty old-fogeyism, to habit rather than thought.  A couple of responses to Professor Curzan's post are instructive: not quite with the trembling of empurpled wattles one often witnesses in these operations, but old-school peeving nonetheless.  One reader, Brian Able Ragen, remarks at some length: " Some of us object to being transformed into pieces of furniture.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Coming across a reference to Steve Buttry's excellent advice for tightening stories in a 2011 post at The Buttry Diary , I was particularly struck by his remark about the failure of stories when they are written for sources rather than readers I want to talk today about some of the things implicit in that invaluable maxim, write for the reader, not the source . A reporter can write about establishing the essential balance of...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
An article in The Sun  last week characterized a sixty-eight-year-old woman trapped in a burning boat in the harbor as "elderly. " We should have known better than that. The Associated Press Stylebook  urges the same kind of caution about elderly  that it observes for racial and ethnic terms: "Use this word carefully and sparingly. Do not refer to a person as elderly  unless it is clearly relevant to the story. " Generic expressions such as concern for the elderly  are OK, since presumably the older reader can always assume that you mean someone else.  More from the AP Stylebook : "If the intent is to show than an individual's faculties have deteriorated, cite a graphic example and give attribution for it. Use age when available and appropriate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.