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By JACQUES KELLY | September 20, 1993
Mention Read Street and some Baltimoreans will recall a painful tooth extraction at the Medical Arts Building. Others will think about the first pair of bell bottom jeans they bought in 1968.The weekend's second annual Read Street Festival was more of a blue jeans occasion. Baltimore's version of a Carnaby Street and Greenwich Village staged a street fair that got half rained out Saturday but bounced back yesterday. About 3,000 persons attended."Our goal was to showcase the neighborhood, to want to come back," said Joe Pitta, co-chairman of the event and an owner of Neal's hair studio in the 200 block of West Read.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 13, 2013
While Baltimore's development community was focused on the City Council vote on Harbor Point this week, a crew of test-boring workers set up equipment at the corner of Charles and Read streets in Mount Vernon. They fired up a derrick and drilled down through the asphalt to see if a new eight-story apartment building could rise just a couple of blocks from the Washington Monument. If this one gets built — and there have been unkept promises at Charles and Read before — an unattractive, gap-toothed hole in the neighborhood would be filled with what promises to be a stylish apartment house with an expansive view on Baltimore history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Last week marked the first anniversary of Read Street, a significant milestone considering that Nancy and I were novices to blogging and barely knew each other when we started. Over the past year, which included about 850 blog posts, I've come to have a better appreciation for her literary tastes, which run to supernatural killers and strong female protagonists, or any combination of the two such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. I've also enjoyed getting to know the Baltimore area's fellow book lovers, who joined discussions on topics ranging from favorite reads to faked memoirs to shelving strategies (by author, genre or color-coded?
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Baltimore concluded its 15th annual book festival Sunday by acknowledging a newer form of literary interaction: book blogs. "Anything and everything to do with technology is definitely a hot topic," said Tracy Baskerville, spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, which produces the festival. "You'll be seeing even more next year. " Baskerville predicted panels devoted to e-books and more about the social media literary forums that enable book lovers to interact with authors.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
For more from the world of books, check out the Sun's newest blog, Read Street, starting tomorrow. Read Street will focus on the social side of reading and feature profiles of Baltimore-area book clubs, recommendations from local stores, the latest on audio books and a calendar of author appearances, readings and other events. You'll find it at baltimoresun.com/readstreet.
NEWS
May 4, 2006
Street closures and parking restrictions will go into effect today for Baltimore's 89th Flower Mart, which runs from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. From 3 p.m. today to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, city officials will close Charles Street from Centre Street to Read Street; Monument Street from St. Paul Street to Cathedral Street; and Madison Street from St. Paul Street to Cathedral Street. As a detour, northbound Charles Street traffic will be sent east on Centre Street, north on Calvert Street, west on Mount Royal Avenue and back onto Charles Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Lately on the Read Street blog, we've been ranting about annoying phrases that clutter our speech and writing. The discussion was sparked by a recent Oxford University research project on the 10 Most Annoying Phrases, a list culled from books, papers, magazines, broadcast, the Internet and other sources. Researchers fingered the inane business phrase "at the end of the day," noted the oxymoron "fairly unique," and highlighted redundancies such as "I personally" and "at this moment in time."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
After a six-year hiatus, the Read Street Festival will make a comeback on Sept. 19 -- the same weekend that the City Fair was to have been held until planners decided to cancel it due to lack of funds.On the next day, Center Stage Theater will kick off its 30th anniversary season by holding a street festival on Monument Street between Calvert and St. Paul streets.During the mid-1960s, the Read Street Festival was Baltimore's answer to Woodstock or Haight Asbury, a spontaneous event each fall that epitomized the era of hippies and flower power.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
The Baltimore City Department of Transportation says several downtown streets will be closed for about two hours tomorrow evening for the kick-off parade of AFRAM Expo '91.AFRAM, a three-day festival featuring African-American cultural exhibits and events, ends Sunday.The parade is slated to begin at 6:30 p.m. at Eutaw Street and Martin Luther King Boulevard and proceed east on the boulevard, then southeast on Read Street, south on Cathedral Street into Liberty Street, Hopkins Place and Sharp Street, concluding at Festival Hall.
NEWS
December 23, 2001
Baltimore Reads leaves Read Street for Symphony BALTIMORE - The Baltimore Reads literacy organization has a new home. The group, which since 1994 had its headquarters on Read Street, moved into new offices last weekend at the Symphony Center office building near Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The new location is accessible to light rail and the Metro subway, has more room for classrooms and technological devices, and features a family learning library and an instruction room. Moving expenses are being paid through a $500,000 community funding drive.
NEWS
By NANCY JOHNSON and NANCY JOHNSON,baltimoresun.com/readstreet | November 6, 2009
baltimoresun.com/10spot -Many beloved literary figures, including Edgar Allan Poe, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Rachel Carson, have left their marks in Maryland. Here are the best places to relive a bit of bookish history. Fort McHenry. Francis Scott Key's poem, "The Defence of Fort McHenry," was inspired by the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812, but it would take more than a century for it to be officially recognized as our national anthem, renamed "The Star-Spangled Banner." Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum (203 N. Amity St.)
NEWS
By David Rosenthal and David Rosenthal,david.rosenthal@baltsun.com | July 19, 2009
Earlier this year, I listed 10 Reasons to Hate the Kindles, including this one on the downside of reading e-books in public: Beautiful Russian ballerinas won't introduce themselves upon noticing your copy of Secrets of Nijinsky. As someone who often carries a book around Baltimore, the inwardness and anonymity of the e-book reading experience seems very odd. I don't mean that we should brandish the latest "hot" book in public like some designer handbag. "Look, the new Pynchon!" It's sad if books become just another way of broadcasting our feelings, like T-shirts or bumper stickers.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,Dave.Rosenthal@baltsun.com | May 31, 2009
With summer upon us, it's time to start assembling a list of the Best Dirty Books. Not that kind of dirty. I mean books meant to be read outdoors because they carry a whiff of salt spray or the grit of a sandy beach. For me, they're the perfect read for a summer vacation. Here are a few classics that meet the standard. If you have other recommendations, let me know in an e-mail or in a comment on Read Street. Dune. Frank Herbert's science fiction tale, which started a trilogy and led to several lesser works by other authors, takes place on a planet covered by sand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Last week marked the first anniversary of Read Street, a significant milestone considering that Nancy and I were novices to blogging and barely knew each other when we started. Over the past year, which included about 850 blog posts, I've come to have a better appreciation for her literary tastes, which run to supernatural killers and strong female protagonists, or any combination of the two such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. I've also enjoyed getting to know the Baltimore area's fellow book lovers, who joined discussions on topics ranging from favorite reads to faked memoirs to shelving strategies (by author, genre or color-coded?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
Last spring, as I was getting ready to launch the Read Street blog, I stopped by the Enoch Pratt central library on a warm Saturday for the annual CityLit Festival. The lobby was filled with local writers and poets, as well as representatives of journals, publishing houses and literary organizations. There was an amazing energy in the room. Amazing because on most days, the Baltimore area's literary community is split into bits and pieces: lectures, books clubs, poetry readings and author appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal | March 29, 2009
I ask the question after re-reading more then 325 comments on Read Street about the Stephen King/Stephenie Meyer fan-feud. (It started when King said the author of the best-selling Twilight series couldn't write; her fans retaliated.) Many are teeming with misspellings, the sort that grate on the soul. I've made my peace with abbreviations common in texting and Twittering: u, cant, ur, omg, lol, idk. Others are counter-culture spellings - lyfe, skilllz, etc. - that impart a certain edginess.
NEWS
September 18, 1992
The French have a saying: "The more things change the more they stay the same." This is certainly the case this weekend when Baltimore celebrates the new autumn season with two festivals that are throwbacks to the 1970s.Charm City Fair, an effort by new commercial operators to revive an annual Baltimore tradition under a new name, will run today through Sunday at the parking lot of the old Eastern High School, across from Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street.The three-day carnival will feature arts and crafts, carnival rides and live entertainment by such oldies groups as the Drifters and Marvelettes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Looking back at a year of reading, I noticed that many of my choices were older books. When I headed to Colorado on vacation, I read Willa Cather's My Antonia. I also filled some glaring holes in my reading list; that led me (at last) to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Other favorites from my 2008 list: * Deadwood by Pete Dexter. The fictional tale of an aging Wild Bill Hickok offers a warts-and-all view of the West. There's little heroism - just mud and blood and early death. And motley characters, including a gunslinger who carries around a human head in hopes of collecting a bounty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL and DAVE ROSENTHAL,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
This week on Read Street, we've been discussing a topic dear to my heart (and stomach): Baltimore's best places to eat and read. I developed the habit in my years as a reporter, traveling around the mid-Atlantic and beyond. When you have to eat by yourself, there's nothing better than a good book to shake that sense of alone-ness. You need the right restaurant, one that's not too noisy, not too dark, not too rushed. The food must be right, too. I often read at Charles Village's Chipotle, which gets great light from huge windows, but it took months to perfect a system of holding my chicken burrito, keeping my book flat on the table and turning the pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL and DAVE ROSENTHAL,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
Over the past week, we've been discussing book club breakups. I'd bet that most clubs have lived through some variation of this trauma: the member who drops out suddenly or shows up less and less, the group that collapses entirely. The discussion began when reporter Mary Carole McCauley made her first appearance on Read Street and wrote about leaving her club. She had participated for a few years, but when several favorite members moved away, she took a hard look at the demands of a club.
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