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NEWS
February 27, 2002
"Poppy by Avi is a great book. It's about a cute mouse on an adventure to find a new home. On the way, he has to go through some hard and scary things. When you finish the book, you can read the next book: Poppy and Rye. I really recommend these books." -- Martha Plack Bryn Mawr Elementary "I read a good book called Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne. The characters are Pooh, Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore and Owl. Pooh goes on silly and funny adventures because he wants honey. I like this book because it is interesting to me. I hope you like this book, too."
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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | August 14, 2006
If you are the parent of a high school student and would like to ruin his or her summer, here's a good way to do it: Make the kid read books. This is what my wife and I did to our 15-year-old, and it really worked. He says we made his life miserable. He says none of his friends have to read books during the summer, so why should he? He says we're the meanest parents in the whole world. So the other day, we decided to level with him. "The only reason we had kids," we told him, "was to make them miserable.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
An interview with Angie Engles, facilitator of a book club at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library. The club is called the Savage Mystery Book Club and periodically changes its name when the group focuses on different genres. What book are members reading this month? Last time we met, we decided we would read Agatha Christie books and Dorothy Sayers books and sort of get a feel for the older mysteries. ... At first, we were going to have everyone read the same book, and then we decided to read books from both authors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal and Nancy Johnston and Dave Rosenthal and Nancy Johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
All week on Read Street, folks have been describing their polygamous reading habits. I was shocked - shocked - to learn that some people are reading three, five, even 10 books at once. I'm a one-book man, the kind of guy who makes a commitment to a book and doesn't abandon it when the next pretty cover happens by. I can imagine this scene, when one of the polygamist readers comes home: "So where have you been all night? I've been here, with that Barnes & Noble bookmark stuck on page 135, just waiting for you to come back."
NEWS
March 25, 2001
`Reading Makes Cents' campaign under way TIMONIUM - The annual "Reading Makes Cents" read-a-thon to benefit Baltimore County's Even Start family literacy program is under way. Business and community organizations will gather pledges and read books from Tuesday through April 17. The project raised about $33,000 last year for Even Start, which offers a range of child and adult education programs through the Baltimore County school system in an effort to...
NEWS
November 21, 2002
An interview with Jan Ulrich, member of Turf Valley and Beyond Book Club. When did your club get started? I think it was 1996 when it was started. Turf Valley Overlook is our neighborhood, and the reason we call it "beyond" is we started getting members from surrounding neighborhoods. What book are members reading this month? The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. It's [adventure] fiction. We try to choose a book from various genres and at least touch on something that we haven't done in the past.
NEWS
November 19, 1994
Do children need to read and read aloud obscene language and racial epithets in order to understand the realities of "street life" and the underworld?That's one of the questions raised by parents' recent discovery that freshmen at Aberdeen High School were required to read a controversial novel about teen-age drug use in the inner city.The incident indicates a need for Harford school officials to more closely monitor teachers' reading assignments. The English teacher who chose the book ignored established rules to inform parents of the controversial assignment and not to read passages aloud in class; she also chose a work that is more than two decades old for the purpose of describing today's unpleasant "realities."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 3, 1998
(With apologies to the late Theodor Seuss Geisel)Hillary Clinton wants you to read.For kids, she said, it's a vital need.At the Learning Ideas store out in P.G.she would read to tots ages 4 and 3.(She also got heaps of publicity.When she arrives, so does TV.)On the 94th B-day of Dr. Seuss,She put the spotlight to good use.And so she told the assembled crowdThey need to read - and to read aloud.With hands to be held and books to be read,Thoughts of subpoenas turned tail and fled.Some 50 adults were also there.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 19, 2004
CASCO BAY, Maine - And now we turn to our summer reading list. OK, our mid-summer reading list. We are, blush, late with our report. Indeed, we were reminded of our tardiness last week, when the National Endowment for the Arts reported ominously on the decline and fall of reading. Barely over half of Americans read any book at all this year. Was it something we didn't say? Actually, we suspect that too many of the "big books" these days are political screeds instead of good reads. So herewith, as a public service, is a list neither blue nor red, but black and white and read all over.
NEWS
August 26, 2001
Editor's note: Today Jerdine Nolen shares picture books perfect for back-to-school preparation. If you are reading this, chances are you have a young one who is about to take a giant leap into the future. She is either getting ready to begin her career as a student or returning to school. One way to help her out is to read books and prepare for the road ahead. Hearing and reading stories of those who have gone before us takes some of the worry out of the situation and can make the transition easier.
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