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By Jane M. Earhart | September 17, 1990
GROWING up as an only child, I was always able to entertain myself by reading. It seems to me I must have read at birth. I can remember begging my mother to read me the book with the beautiful pictures. Soon, I could read the story . . . actually, because I memorized all the words as Mother read the story again and again.Books have been a mainstay to me through my life and in recent years have perhaps preserved my sanity. They carried me through a most dreadful experience, the sudden death of my husband.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL and DAVE ROSENTHAL,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
Over the past week, we've been discussing book club breakups. I'd bet that most clubs have lived through some variation of this trauma: the member who drops out suddenly or shows up less and less, the group that collapses entirely. The discussion began when reporter Mary Carole McCauley made her first appearance on Read Street and wrote about leaving her club. She had participated for a few years, but when several favorite members moved away, she took a hard look at the demands of a club.
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NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | June 16, 2008
I had thought it was just me. In reading the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic, however, I learned that I am not alone. There are at least two of us who have forgotten how to read. I do not mean that I have lost the ability to decode letters into words. I mean, rather, that I am finding it increasingly difficult to read deeply, to muster the focus and concentration necessary to wrestle any text longer than a paragraph or more intellectually demanding than a TV listing. You're talking to a fellow whose idea of fun has always been to retire to a quiet corner with a thick newspaper or a thicker book and disappear inside.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | June 16, 2008
I had thought it was just me. In reading the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic, however, I learned that I am not alone. There are at least two of us who have forgotten how to read. I do not mean that I have lost the ability to decode letters into words. I mean, rather, that I am finding it increasingly difficult to read deeply, to muster the focus and concentration necessary to wrestle any text longer than a paragraph or more intellectually demanding than a TV listing. You're talking to a fellow whose idea of fun has always been to retire to a quiet corner with a thick newspaper or a thicker book and disappear inside.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 26, 1997
Never mind the division. A pennant or nothing.The interrupted Southeast Asian economic miracle is really something, if only you could breathe and see it through the smoke and haze.It's Baltimore Book Festival weekend in the City That Reads. If someone you know was ever going to read a book, now wouldbe the time.Be patriotic. Eat Chesapeake rockfish.Pub Date: 9/26/97
NEWS
March 12, 2000
Tips to Success The Sun's readers tell their success stories and offer tips on encouraging children to read. Kitchen helpers "My kids help me with dinner by reading the recipe and directions for the meal I prepare. This also helped them to understand fractions by having them reduce or increase ingredients along with using measuring spoons and cups." -- Mari Shoebotham Columbia Getting into the story "I used to insert my child's first name into stories so they could more readily visualize the actions of the character.
NEWS
By Paul Kropp | December 5, 1999
At the turn of the century, boys' books were full of daring and adventure, while girls' books offered models of mothering and housekeeping. Thank goodness, times have changed.Nonetheless, boys and girls do tend to read somewhat different books, beginning in middle school, when peer-group pressure becomes so important. Most girls remain quite willing to read a book whose central character is a boy, perhaps because they read well enough to project themselves into another character. Boys, alas, become increasingly unwilling to read any book that has a girl as the central character.
NEWS
December 19, 2002
An interview with Pam Everett, founding member of Food for Thoughts book club. What book are members reading? For our December meeting, we're having a Christmas get-together. The book we're reading now will be for [a discussion in] February, and that is Waiting by Ha Jin. Some months we do something other than read a book. Now for January, we're going to watch a video: Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood. I haven't read [the book]. One member read it, and she said it was good. But she thought we'd enjoy the video more; hence we're watching the video.
FEATURES
December 8, 1999
Sue Alexander, author of such highly regarded children's books as "Lila on the Landing," "There's More ... Much More" and "Nadia the Willful," is the mother of three grown children and the grandmother of two. She lives in Canoga Park, Calif., with her husband, Joel.She shares these recollections on the Children's Book Council web site, www.cbcbooks. org."As I was growing up in Chicago, it never occurred to me that someday I would write books for anyone to read. Strange as it may sound, not until I was 12 did I realize that books were written by people, even though I had started reading before I went to school.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
"In 'Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill,' Daniel lived in Paradise Valley. He hated living there and wished he could be anyplace else. The part I liked was when he was chasing a nice-looking horse, but it really was a car." -- LaByanca Harvey Grove Park Elementary " 'Koko's Kitten' is a good book because the author Francine Patterson talks about a real gorilla. Koko knows how to communicate in American Sign Language. The photographs are great." -- Michael Dimick Seneca Elementary "I read a book called 'Amber Brown Goes Fourth' by Paula Danziger.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2007
Radar seemed to be listening intently as Christian Tager read a book with the title Wolf. "Radar likes my reading," said Christian, 7, after he finished reading the book. "He kisses me when I read to him." Christian, a second-grader at Logan Elementary School in Dundalk, and Radar, a Great Dane, were one of 15 teams participating on a recent afternoon in a reading enrichment program called PAWS -- as in "Pets Are Wonderful Support." Under the eight-week program, 31 Logan second-graders meet after school for one hour to read to a dog and its owner.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,sun reporter | August 25, 2006
The last days of summer break are slowly ticking away, and James Reynolds is scrambling. In between serving customers and running the shop at the Great Cookie in Mondawmin Mall, where he works full time, the 16-year-old City College student is trying to squeeze in reading all 320 pages of a book about genocide in the 1930s Dominican Republic. Studying The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat is not exactly the way he wants to spend his final flash of freedom, Reynolds says with a sigh, but he is determined to get a good start on his senior year when school starts Monday.
NEWS
By KRISTI FUNDERBURK and KRISTI FUNDERBURK,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
Audrey Sapirstein gazed admiringly at the new ring she had just placed on her finger. Standing outside the castle faM-gade of the Towson Library's children's reading area Monday morning, she relished the initial prize she earned through the library's Summer Reading Club. After pre-registering for the program last week, the 9-year-old Mount Washington resident got busy on the first of four tasks she must complete this summer. The first objective included reading a newspaper, reading with a friend or pet and reading about a mystery, which is in line with the theme of this year's program, "Clue into Reading."
NEWS
June 4, 2006
Summer reading isn't just for adults. This month, the Enoch Pratt Free Library will announce its summer book, The Watsons Go to Birmingham -- 1963, which is part of its annual effort to encourage school-age children to read throughout the summer. The 1995 book, by Christopher Paul Curtis, won the Newbery Honor Award and a Coretta Scott King Honor Award. It's about an African-American family of five who travel from their home in Flint, Mich., to Birmingham, Ala., in 1963, a pivotal year in civil-rights history.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | June 4, 2006
I'm ready to get away. Aren't you? It appears that many of us deserve a little rest and relaxation. We are working too hard and don't have enough time to play. You know the cliche -- too much work makes ... So let UniSun help you plan your time for fun and relaxation. We've given you some things you might want to think about doing -- taking a trip to one of five destinations, going to local festivals or conferences or making new friends by joining a book club. If you don't want to stay around the area, then get your car in road condition or make airline reservations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Students at Arundel High School will be hitting the books - and magazines and newspapers - this summer as part of a new initiative designed to promote lifelong reading. Previously, only students in honors or college-level Advanced Placement classes had to complete reading and other assignments during the summer months. This year, however, all of Arundel High's approximately 2,000 students will turn in a reflection on their summer reading as their first assignment in every class. Arundel is the only high school in the county to undertake such an effort.
NEWS
June 4, 2006
Summer reading isn't just for adults. This month, the Enoch Pratt Free Library will announce its summer book, The Watsons Go to Birmingham -- 1963, which is part of its annual effort to encourage school-age children to read throughout the summer. The 1995 book, by Christopher Paul Curtis, won the Newbery Honor Award and a Coretta Scott King Honor Award. It's about an African-American family of five who travel from their home in Flint, Mich., to Birmingham, Ala., in 1963, a pivotal year in civil-rights history.
FEATURES
August 12, 1998
Here are some read-aloud don'ts for grown-ups:Reading stories you don't enjoy yourself. Your dislike will show in the reading, and that defeats your purpose.Feeling you have to tie every book to classwork. Don't confine the broad spectrum of literature to the narrow limits of the curriculum.Reading above your child's emotional level.Selecting a book your child has already heard or seen on television. Once a novel's plot is known, much of their interest is lost. You can, however, read a book ahead of its appearance on television or at the movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
On the boardwalk of Rehoboth Beach, Baltimore attorney Bill Brooke didn't appear to be breaking any rules as he sat quietly on a bench and read a book. But amid the serenity, interrupted only by the muffled sounds of waves crashing, children squealing and gulls screeching, Brooke was defying convention -- or at least conventional wisdom. It wasn't that he was reading, or how he was reading, it was what he was reading: Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life. That's no beach book.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 24, 2004
Don't get too broken up about Everybody Loves Raymond ending its run on CBS next season. The show's creator sure isn't. What does Phil Rosenthal say to fans who look forward to new episodes? "Goodbye." The series plans only 16 new episodes next season, down from the usual 24. Won't fans be disappointed? "Read a book," Rosenthal says. After living through the hoopla lavished on Sex and the City, Friends and Frasier as they ended their runs, viewers will be in for something decidedly more low-key when Raymond bows out in May after nine seasons.
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