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By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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FEATURES
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 6, 2006
History comes alive in Carroll and Harford counties this weekend, with re-enactors set to play soldiers of the past. The Carroll County Farm Museum will hold its annual Civil War Living History Re-enactment from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow. Re-enactors representing Civil War soldiers from the North and South will camp on the grounds, engage in skirmishes and demonstrate what life was like in the 19th century, organizers say. A mock field hospital will be on display with a horse-drawn ambulance.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Even Revolutionary War action figures need spring training to get their spit-and-polish act together. The men of the Fourth Legionary Corps got back into character for the long re-enacting season with a weekend at Fort Frederick just south of Hagerstown. They didn't shave, fended off the evening chill by gathering around the barracks fireplace and practiced the tactics of 18th century warfare. "It's clearing away the cobwebs and seeing that we have everything we need before we go out," said Mike Nigh of Annapolis, who has been a corps member since 2007.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
Her hair in a snood, and herself insulated in stockings, drawers, petticoats, a hoop and cotton dress, Susan Youhn insisted she wasn't as hot as she looked in the 90-degree heat outside the Mount Clare Mansion in Southwest Baltimore yesterday.She was among the 30 Civil War re-enactors who looked and dressed the part at Camp Carroll, a Civil War military village of cotton tents, rifles, cook stoves, supply barrels and railway yard that remains open to visitors today on a hill at Washington Boulevard and Monroe Street.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | May 10, 1993
It's a good thing the day began with a truce. The Yankees set up camp just on the other side of the hill.But that didn't worry 1st Sgt. Rick Barber of the 19th Georgia Regiment, Archer's Brigade."
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | September 30, 1991
Each time Lauren Cook Burgess dresses in a Confederate soldier's uniform, she takes the same pains to hide her sex as the 400 or more women who disguised themselves as men to fight in the Civil War.She binds her breasts, wears her hair short, pulls her cap down low over her face and speaks in a husky voice.But Ms. Burgess made one mistake when she showed up with her musket and fife for a living history program at Antietam National Battlefield in 1989. She went to the ladies room.When she came out, she found herself at war with the U.S. Park Service instead of the Union Army.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 21, 1998
One hundred years ago, Sgt. Augustus Walley was in Cuba and the Philippines, fighting in the Spanish-American War. A member of the all-black Buffalo Soldiers cavalry unit, he fought alongside Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders at Kettle Hill and San Juan Heights.Yesterday, the memory of the Reisterstown native was honored with the unveiling of a memorial plaque at the intersection of Route 140 and Cockeys Mills Road in Reisterstown.For Houston Wedlock, a retired Army sergeant and Buffalo Soldier re-enactor, the memorial represents long-overdue recognition for Walley, who also received two Medals of Honor.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
The Sons of Confederate Veterans will hold their annual memorial ceremony for Gens. Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson at 11 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Lee-Jackson Monument, Art Museum and Wyman Park Drives, near Johns Hopkins University.The ceremony will include period music by fife and drum groups and a massed formation of Civil War re-enactors in Confederate and Union uniforms.Refreshments will be served afterward at Shriver Hall on Hopkins' campus.Pub Date: 12/16/97
NEWS
May 8, 2000
Troupe to show what 1850s life was like, hold history classes The Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park, 3691 Sarah's Lane, Ellicott City, will hold "Almira's Afternoons" from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. designated Sundays, beginning May 21. Almira's Society, a living history troupe, will show what life was like in America during the 1850s. Park visitors will be invited to attend 15-minute classes on geography, U.S civics and penmanship, and to play Victorian games such as jackstraws, croquet and shuttlecock.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
Many call the Battle of North Point, when the Maryland militia faced thousands of invading British soldiers, the forgotten battle in a nearly forgotten war. But Sunday, nearly 200 years after that pivotal encounter in the War of 1812, thousands will remember as they gather at Fort Howard Park in Edgemere. Not far from the ground where Marylanders fought British troops, they will observe the annual Defenders Day with re-enactments, living history displays, patriotic anthems, even commemorative stamps.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
The redcoats descended on North Point Sunday morning, ready to challenge American soldiers and militiamen standing between them and Baltimore. "We're here to reclaim what is rightfully ours," said Matt Moore, of Aston, Pa., who was dressed in British military garb from the period and toting a musket. Moore and several other men donned British and American uniforms to re-create the Battle of North Point, which took place Sept. 12, 1814 - one day before the famous Battle of Baltimore at Fort McHenry - during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Susan Wooden can work miracles with history. She can get people excited about doing ordinary tasks such as laundry, washing dishes, or hearth cooking. "I go back to a time when there was no electricity and no freezers," Wooden said. "And then I show people how things were done. I enjoy seeing the excitement in the eyes of the audience. I know I have connected with them." Wooden joins a group of historians and living history interpreters as a board member of Jerusalem Mill. She is also a docent volunteer at Hays House, a member of the Maryland Loyalists Battalion, and a volunteer docent at a Colonial Williamsburg event.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
John Bruce McNeal, a retired Social Security Administration information technician, died of appendiceal cancer April 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Eldersburg resident was 57. Mr. McNeal was born in Louisville and spent his early years in Princeton, Ky., before moving to Simsbury, Conn., in 1962. He earned a degree in psychology from The King's College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., in 1973. Mr. McNeal worked for the SSA for 34 years before retiring last month because of failing health.
FEATURES
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 6, 2006
History comes alive in Carroll and Harford counties this weekend, with re-enactors set to play soldiers of the past. The Carroll County Farm Museum will hold its annual Civil War Living History Re-enactment from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow. Re-enactors representing Civil War soldiers from the North and South will camp on the grounds, engage in skirmishes and demonstrate what life was like in the 19th century, organizers say. A mock field hospital will be on display with a horse-drawn ambulance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | April 20, 2006
Civil War Days This weekend, don't be alarmed if you hear musket firings. Or if you see Union soldiers marching through Baltimore. Or if you happen upon a Confederate cavalryman. This weekend, after all, marks the annual Civil War Days downtown. The Civil War-themed weekend begins with a commemoration of the Pratt Street Riot at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Civil War Museum's President Street Station. There, more than 80 war re-enactors will participate in a ceremony with fife and drum music, wreath-laying and more.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
John Bruce McNeal, a retired Social Security Administration information technician, died of appendiceal cancer April 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Eldersburg resident was 57. Mr. McNeal was born in Louisville and spent his early years in Princeton, Ky., before moving to Simsbury, Conn., in 1962. He earned a degree in psychology from The King's College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., in 1973. Mr. McNeal worked for the SSA for 34 years before retiring last month because of failing health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | April 20, 2006
Civil War Days This weekend, don't be alarmed if you hear musket firings. Or if you see Union soldiers marching through Baltimore. Or if you happen upon a Confederate cavalryman. This weekend, after all, marks the annual Civil War Days downtown. The Civil War-themed weekend begins with a commemoration of the Pratt Street Riot at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Civil War Museum's President Street Station. There, more than 80 war re-enactors will participate in a ceremony with fife and drum music, wreath-laying and more.
NEWS
By JENNY JARVIE and JENNY JARVIE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
SELMA, Ala. -- James Hammonds looked stoic as he surveyed Selma's Civil War battlefield, but he could not resist a sigh: The trenches' gray planks had buckled, leaving gaps in the city's defenses. Hammonds, who came up with the idea 19 years ago of re-enacting Selma's place in Civil War history, said he fears that his town is losing another battle. Almost 141 years after a ragtag Confederate army struggled to defend Selma against Union forces, historical re-enactors canceled the Battle of Selma.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
Virgil Bennett, a 15-year-old re-enactor on hand at Fort McHenry yesterday, teased his friend Joseph Sherrill. Both were dressed in blue coats and white pants reminiscent of early 19th-century American soldiers. Virgil boasted that he was the son of an officer, and a low-ranking officer himself. Joseph, 13, was only a private. "We try to stay in character when tourists are around," Virgil joked as he and Joseph wandered toward one of many encampments where other re-enactors stood at attention or gave lessons on how to shoot a cannon during this year's Defenders' Day festivities.
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