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By KEN MURRAY | September 24, 2007
Broncos (2-1) @ Colts (3-0) -- The RCA Dome has been a house of horrors for the Broncos. Denver's new defensive coordinator, Jim Bates, gets his chance to stop Peyton Manning indoors. Chiefs (1-2) @ Chargers (1-2) -- A tough early-season schedule has the Chargers squabbling. The schedule gets better, but they can't afford a 1-3 start.
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SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | September 24, 2007
Broncos (2-1) @ Colts (3-0) -- The RCA Dome has been a house of horrors for the Broncos. Denver's new defensive coordinator, Jim Bates, gets his chance to stop Peyton Manning indoors. Chiefs (1-2) @ Chargers (1-2) -- A tough early-season schedule has the Chargers squabbling. The schedule gets better, but they can't afford a 1-3 start.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
When Scott Pohlman showed up one afternoon for a pickup game with Auburn basketball players for the first time as a freshman, Bryant Smith figured that the scrawny kid who looked like he was about 12 was "a manager or something."Pohlman wasn't a manager.But he is something.Now a sophomore, the 6-foot-2, 160-pound shooting guard saved the top-seeded Tigers from elimination last weekend in the NCAA tournament's South Regional in Indianapolis.Against ninth-seeded Oklahoma State, Pohlman scored a career-high 28 points in an 81-74 victory that put Auburn (29-3)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | October 20, 2006
ASHBURN, Va. -- The sight of Carlos Rogers wearing a cast to protect a broken right thumb earlier this week provoked at least one cynic to suggest that the Washington Redskins cornerback might have an excuse now in case he dropped another potential interception Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts. As it turned out, the injury, suffered in Sunday's 25-22 defeat at home to the Tennessee Titans, required surgery and will keep Rogers on the sideline at the RCA Dome. The search for healthy players is not the only mission Washington's defense will be on against the Colts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | October 20, 2006
ASHBURN, Va. -- The sight of Carlos Rogers wearing a cast to protect a broken right thumb earlier this week provoked at least one cynic to suggest that the Washington Redskins cornerback might have an excuse now in case he dropped another potential interception Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts. As it turned out, the injury, suffered in Sunday's 25-22 defeat at home to the Tennessee Titans, required surgery and will keep Rogers on the sideline at the RCA Dome. The search for healthy players is not the only mission Washington's defense will be on against the Colts.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 11, 1996
It's the biggest Ravens fan migration of the season.On Sunday, Ravens fans by the hundreds will flock by plane, bus and car to Indianapolis to watch their NFL team face the Colts, PTC who left Baltimore 12 years ago.Most groups will travel to the RCA Dome by bus, starting their trek early Sunday morning and arriving four hours before the 8 p.m. kickoff. But fans said the nine-hour trip is a small sacrifice to send their ultimate message."This is a once in a lifetime opportunity," said Drew Clousby, a member of the Ravens Roost.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 3, 2005
No. 2 seed Baylor (31-3) vs. No. 1 seed Louisiana State (33-2) Site: RCA Dome, Indianapolis Time, TV: 7, ESPN Key matchup: LSU's Seimone Augustus vs. Baylor's Abiola Wabara. Augustus, a 6-foot-1 junior, is a heavy favorite to capture national Player of the Year honors and is shooting 55 percent from the field and averaging 20 points. Her ability to face the basket, as well as score from the perimeter, make her the most dangerous player in the women's college game. Wabara, a 6-1 sophomore from Italy, is Baylor's designated perimeter stopper and will spend most of the night shadowing Augustus.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | April 2, 2006
It was raining Friday morning in Indianapolis, and open practices at the RCA Dome for the four teams at the men's Final Four were to begin in a little more than an hour. George Mason was to be first, and it's probably not an accident that it was going earliest, since it would be a shock to see any of the other teams get anywhere close to the overall media attention this weekend that George Mason will. It's also a strong possibility that there are more media following coach Jim Larranaga, the players and school officials this weekend than actual, real George Mason fans.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1996
A domed stadium at Camden Yards might be bad for football players, but it would be very good for college basketball fans in Baltimore and the entire Northeast.This year's Final Four will be played at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, N.J., and the NCAA has no idea when the city game's showcase will return to the Northeast. The NCAA now requires 30,000 seats for the Final Four and hotel space that Syracuse, N.Y., doesn't have, and in the future it will come no closer than the RCA Dome in Indianapolis or the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 16, 2003
CHICAGO - Chicago, once the Second City, fell to third when Los Angeles surpassed it in population, and even third place is more than it usually achieves in the National Football League standings. But on Sept. 29, on ABC's Monday Night Football, the city will unveil to the nation a title-winner of sorts: the most expensive publicly funded stadium in the NFL. Locals don't have to be told that the renovation of Soldier Field does not appeal to every eye. Rather than tear down the World War I memorial, the Chicago Park District and the Bears agreed to preserve the exterior and replace the interior.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | April 2, 2006
It was raining Friday morning in Indianapolis, and open practices at the RCA Dome for the four teams at the men's Final Four were to begin in a little more than an hour. George Mason was to be first, and it's probably not an accident that it was going earliest, since it would be a shock to see any of the other teams get anywhere close to the overall media attention this weekend that George Mason will. It's also a strong possibility that there are more media following coach Jim Larranaga, the players and school officials this weekend than actual, real George Mason fans.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE AND HEATHER A. DINICH and DAVID STEELE AND HEATHER A. DINICH,SUN REPORTERS | April 2, 2006
INDIANAPOLIS -- George Mason coach Jim Larranaga was not able to get Bobby Plump - the hero of the 1954 Indiana high school champion team immortalized in the movie Hoosiers - to speak to his players before playing last night's game. But the players were visited Friday by another former star whose team's story got the Hollywood treatment: Harry Flournoy of 1966 NCAA champion Texas Western. "I told them, when we went into the tournament, no one expected us to do well. We were a small school and no one expected us to do what we did," Flournoy said yesterday, recalling his remarks to the players.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The nation's two premier conferences are missing. The Southeastern is back, along with the greatest dynasty in the history of the NCAA tournament and a program that had no national recognition two weeks ago. The Final Four hasn't seen a quartet like this since 1980, when not a single No. 1 seed got to Indianapolis. That was the first season for the Big East, and the last time the Final Four did not include a team from either it or the Atlantic Coast Conference. The ACC, which had a Final Four team in 15 of the past 17 seasons, didn't get one to the Elite Eight this time.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
INDIANAPOLIS -- If this was a statement game for the Indianapolis Colts, their defense said it best. Yes, they can play the Pittsburgh Steelers' brand of physical, intimidating football, not just the high-wire act of a big-play offense. Even though the night started with a home-run pass by Peyton Manning, it was the Colts' defense that inspired a 26-7 victory over the Steelers before an RCA Dome crowd of 57,442 and a national TV audience last night. The Colts stuffed the Steelers' running game, intercepted quarterback Ben Roethlisberger twice and kept a tight grip on the field-position game.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2005
INDIANAPOLIS - The theory, for championship teams, is to play to your strength, to go with what works, to dance with the partner that "brung" you, so to speak. Baylor women's basketball coach Kim Mulkey-Robertson, who had danced all season with a man-to-man defense, was reluctant to change a formula that brought the Lady Bears to their first Final Four appearance. But with Louisiana State, the top overall seed in the tournament, on the verge of blowing the Lady Bears off the RCA Dome floor, Mulkey-Robertson rolled the dice and put her team into a matchup zone that flustered the Lady Tigers, and their star, junior Seimone Augustus, and got Baylor a 68-57 win in last night's national semifinal.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 3, 2005
No. 2 seed Baylor (31-3) vs. No. 1 seed Louisiana State (33-2) Site: RCA Dome, Indianapolis Time, TV: 7, ESPN Key matchup: LSU's Seimone Augustus vs. Baylor's Abiola Wabara. Augustus, a 6-foot-1 junior, is a heavy favorite to capture national Player of the Year honors and is shooting 55 percent from the field and averaging 20 points. Her ability to face the basket, as well as score from the perimeter, make her the most dangerous player in the women's college game. Wabara, a 6-1 sophomore from Italy, is Baylor's designated perimeter stopper and will spend most of the night shadowing Augustus.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- As Nancy Lieberman-Cline surveyed the scene at the RCA Dome for last night's Big Ten women's tournament final between Purdue and Penn State, a satisfied smile spread across her face."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2005
INDIANAPOLIS - The theory, for championship teams, is to play to your strength, to go with what works, to dance with the partner that "brung" you, so to speak. Baylor women's basketball coach Kim Mulkey-Robertson, who had danced all season with a man-to-man defense, was reluctant to change a formula that brought the Lady Bears to their first Final Four appearance. But with Louisiana State, the top overall seed in the tournament, on the verge of blowing the Lady Bears off the RCA Dome floor, Mulkey-Robertson rolled the dice and put her team into a matchup zone that flustered the Lady Tigers, and their star, junior Seimone Augustus, and got Baylor a 68-57 win in last night's national semifinal.
SPORTS
By David Steele | December 20, 2004
INDIANAPOLIS - The Colts got booed off their home field last night. The Ravens made the fans in the RCA Dome do that, stunning a national TV audience and the Indianapolis players themselves. Peyton Manning and Co. slouched off the field, heads hanging, the door slammed on them at the 15-yard line late in the fourth quarter. Mike Vanderjagt, as automatic as they come, missed a chip-shot field goal to incite more booing. Nothing was easy for anyone entrusted and expected to score for the Colts.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY | December 19, 2004
SCOUTING REPORT Ravens run offense vs. Colts run defense: The Colts' soft spot is their run defense. They give up 4.6 yards a carry (sixth worst in the NFL) because of a lack of size. Indianapolis tackles Montae Reagor and Josh Williams both weigh 285 pounds, and ends Dwight Freeney and Raheem Brock are below 275. The Ravens could exploit this area better if running back Jamal Lewis were healthier. His right ankle is still sore and limits his cutting ability. If they can keep the game close or take a lead, look for the Ravens to run close to 35 times, with Lewis taking 25 carries and Chester Taylor handling the rest.
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