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NEWS
April 17, 2009
On April 12, 2009, RAYNA ELIZABETH LEE. On Saturday, a memorial service will be held at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel (EAST), 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 12:30 to 1 P.M with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
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NEWS
April 17, 2009
On April 12, 2009, RAYNA ELIZABETH LEE. On Saturday, a memorial service will be held at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel (EAST), 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 12:30 to 1 P.M with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
Students, teachers and coaches at Oakland Mills High School hoped they could play basketball, paint faces, auction Orioles' tickets and bake enough brownies to raise $25,000 for Rayna DuBose, the 18-year-old freshman at Virginia Tech University who is recovering from meningitis and amputation of her hands and feet. At a recent school fair-turned-fund-raiser, hundreds of members of the Oakland Mills community helped make the $25,000 goal, and added nearly another $25,000. Maxine Beale, an academic mentor at Oakland Mills who is organizing much of the fund-raising effort to help DuBose and her parents, said the total from the "Evening for Rayna" affair was more than $49,000.
NEWS
By Paul Moore | June 6, 2004
MEMORIAL DAY weekend was especially memorable this year with U.S. troops engaged in a war in Iraq and the upcoming 60th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. The Sun ran a front-page story with a lead photo in its Sunday editions about the dedication of the World War II Memorial in Washington. The newspaper also published a lead photo of Memorial Day events on the front page Monday and Tuesday. It also was a big weekend for Sun sports reporter Kevin Van Valkenburg. On Sunday and Monday, his two-part narrative, "Rayna's Second Season," was published.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Skin glistening in the sun, and lips red from Sno Cones, hundreds of people wanting to help 18-year-old Rayna DuBose braved yesterday's heat, converging on Oakland Mills High School to walk, run, jump, dance and - most of all - to put their money where their hearts were. "I'm here just to show support for Rayna," said Oakland Mills junior Whitney Jones, who spent her 16th birthday yesterday shooting hoops in a three-point shoot-out competition to raise money for DuBose, a 2001 graduate and former star basketball player who was a freshman at Virginia Tech this year.
FEATURES
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 31, 2004
Each day, each hour, Willie and Andrea DuBose think things can't get any worse. And then they do. Their daughter, Rayna, a graceful athlete, a college basketball player with a radiant smile, an 18-year-old who a week ago had so many possibilities in front of her, is lying in a hospital bed in a coma. For two days, doctors have warned her parents to prepare themselves: She may not live. She came to the University of Virginia Medical Center in the belly of a helicopter, with her blood pressure dropping and her body convulsing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg and Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
LONG BEFORE Rayna Du-Bose became a basketball star -- and half a lifetime before the day she got sick, went to the hospital and almost never came home -- she was a dancer. Ballet, to be specific. The soft, poetic music and her long arms and legs formed a natural partnership. Dance was her first love, and as is often the case with first loves, she never forgot what it felt like, to twirl and spin and smirk at the limitations of gravity. The DuBose family was not rich, but there was money for tutus and ballet slippers, even if Rayna would outgrow them in mere months.
NEWS
By Paul Moore | June 6, 2004
MEMORIAL DAY weekend was especially memorable this year with U.S. troops engaged in a war in Iraq and the upcoming 60th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. The Sun ran a front-page story with a lead photo in its Sunday editions about the dedication of the World War II Memorial in Washington. The newspaper also published a lead photo of Memorial Day events on the front page Monday and Tuesday. It also was a big weekend for Sun sports reporter Kevin Van Valkenburg. On Sunday and Monday, his two-part narrative, "Rayna's Second Season," was published.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - Rayna DuBose smiles a lot these days, and with good reason. She's got her life back. It has been a little more than a year now (372 days to be exact) since DuBose, 19, contracted meningococcal meningitis during her freshman year as a member of the Virginia Tech women's basketball team. After spending three weeks in a coma and suffering almost total organ failure, DuBose, who is from Columbia, had to have her hands and feet amputated. She has spent the past six months learning to use prosthetics, and can now walk on her own, feed and dress herself, and do many of the things she could do before her illness.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
On May 19, 2009 LYDIA LOUISE (nee Nelson) beloved wife of the late Grafton A. Matthews, Sr.; devoted mother of Nelson, Vivian, Rayna and the late Grafton, Jr.; loving grandmother of David. On Thursday friends may call at the Estep Brothers Funeral Home, 1300 Eutaw Pl. from 12 noon until 7 p.m. Family will receive friends on Friday 10:30 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. at the Douglas Memorial Comm. Church, 1325 Madison Ave. Funeral Services to follow. Interment Baltimore National Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Sun Staff | May 31, 2004
Second of two parts Each day, each hour, Willie and Andrea DuBose think things can't get any worse. And then they do. Their daughter, Rayna, a graceful athlete, a college basketball player with a radiant smile, an 18-year-old who a week ago had so many possibilities in front of her, is lying in a hospital bed in a coma. For two days, doctors have warned her parents to prepare themselves: She may not live. She came to the University of Virginia Medical Center in the belly of a helicopter, with her blood pressure dropping and her body convulsing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg and Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
LONG BEFORE Rayna Du-Bose became a basketball star -- and half a lifetime before the day she got sick, went to the hospital and almost never came home -- she was a dancer. Ballet, to be specific. The soft, poetic music and her long arms and legs formed a natural partnership. Dance was her first love, and as is often the case with first loves, she never forgot what it felt like, to twirl and spin and smirk at the limitations of gravity. The DuBose family was not rich, but there was money for tutus and ballet slippers, even if Rayna would outgrow them in mere months.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - Rayna DuBose smiles a lot these days, and with good reason. She's got her life back. It has been a little more than a year now (372 days to be exact) since DuBose, 19, contracted meningococcal meningitis during her freshman year as a member of the Virginia Tech women's basketball team. After spending three weeks in a coma and suffering almost total organ failure, DuBose, who is from Columbia, had to have her hands and feet amputated. She has spent the past six months learning to use prosthetics, and can now walk on her own, feed and dress herself, and do many of the things she could do before her illness.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
Students, teachers and coaches at Oakland Mills High School hoped they could play basketball, paint faces, auction Orioles' tickets and bake enough brownies to raise $25,000 for Rayna DuBose, the 18-year-old freshman at Virginia Tech University who is recovering from meningitis and amputation of her hands and feet. At a recent school fair-turned-fund-raiser, hundreds of members of the Oakland Mills community helped make the $25,000 goal, and added nearly another $25,000. Maxine Beale, an academic mentor at Oakland Mills who is organizing much of the fund-raising effort to help DuBose and her parents, said the total from the "Evening for Rayna" affair was more than $49,000.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Skin glistening in the sun, and lips red from Sno Cones, hundreds of people wanting to help 18-year-old Rayna DuBose braved yesterday's heat, converging on Oakland Mills High School to walk, run, jump, dance and - most of all - to put their money where their hearts were. "I'm here just to show support for Rayna," said Oakland Mills junior Whitney Jones, who spent her 16th birthday yesterday shooting hoops in a three-point shoot-out competition to raise money for DuBose, a 2001 graduate and former star basketball player who was a freshman at Virginia Tech this year.
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