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NEWS
February 20, 2005
Suddenly, on February 11, 2005, RAYMOND JAMES, of Lansdowne; beloved brother of Jeannette Coward, Adrienne Roper, and Anthony John Skievich. Also survived by several nieces, nephews, great nieces and one great nephew. Services and interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory, to Our Daily Bread. Arrangements by Mc CULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A. (Brooklyn).
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 19, 2007
In the Middle Ages moats were deep water-filled trenches that encircled castles to protect kings. The wider, the better. In 2007 moats are the competitive advantages that protect dominant companies and their shareholders. The wider, the better. The goal in trying to pick companies with wide moats is to give investors the security of knowing that a firm isn't likely to see its products or services overtaken by rivals.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Joseph Coors Jr., a member of the family that founded Adolph Coors Co., the third-largest U.S. brewery, was swindled in a scheme in which he and others invested $40 million, the Securities and Exchange Commission said. Golden Heritage LLC, a family investment body controlled by Joseph Coors, joined in a program that promised a 100 percent return per week, the SEC alleged in a complaint filed in a federal court in San Francisco. Coors was told that his money would be invested in bank or other financial institution instruments rated AA or better, the SEC said.
NEWS
February 20, 2005
Suddenly, on February 11, 2005, RAYMOND JAMES, of Lansdowne; beloved brother of Jeannette Coward, Adrienne Roper, and Anthony John Skievich. Also survived by several nieces, nephews, great nieces and one great nephew. Services and interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory, to Our Daily Bread. Arrangements by Mc CULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A. (Brooklyn).
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2005
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Mason Hawkins, who built his money management company into the largest shareholder at Hilton Hotels Corp., took advantage of the bull market for lodging stocks by selling his entire stake, according to a regulatory filing yesterday. Southeastern Asset Management Inc., the investment advisory firm founded by Hawkins, 56, filed documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission reporting that the firm no longer holds Hilton shares. As recently as Sept. 30, Southeastern had 53 million shares, equal to 13.7 percent of Hilton's common stock outstanding.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
Visual Networks Inc. of Rockville said yesterday that its chief executive has resigned and that Peter Minihane has been named interim CEO. Elton King, the company's former president, CEO and director, resigned for personal reasons, the company said. Minihane, who is also a company director, has held several positions at Visual Networks. Most recently, he was the company's chief financial officer and chief operating officer until he resigned in January for personal reasons. "It was very unfortunate that he had to resign," said Todd Koffman, managing director of equity research for Raymond James & Associates in St. Petersburg, Fla. But Koffman said he sees yesterday's announcement as very favorable.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its fourth-quarter loss widened to $15.1 million as sales of its Gliadel brain-cancer treatment fell. The Baltimore company said the loss, equivalent to 50 cents per share, expanded from $13.8 million, or 46 cents per share, in the 2001 quarter. Revenue plummeted to $1.6 million from $6.8 million after buyers, who had overstocked Gliadel earlier in the year, let inventories fall back in line with demand. Analysts had expected even worse results, predicting a loss of 59 cents a share, according to the average estimate of five analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial/First Call.
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder | June 27, 1991
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Bennett Brown, chairman of the C&S/Sovran Corp., will discuss a possible merger with NCNB Corp. with his bank's board of directors today -- a merger that would create the nation's second-largest bank.NCNB Corp. chairman Hugh McColl Jr., who proposed the merger earlier this week, met with his bank's directors yesterday.Both companies confirm McColl and Brown met within the last few days, though results of meeting weren't disclosed.News of the talks comes after weeks of speculation about a deal and amid reports the two sides are close to an agreement.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Because demand for new and rebuilt jet engines has remained weaker than expected, Annapolis-based UNC Inc. warned its investors yesterday that its profits through the end of the year would be "minimal."The announcement came as a shock to some who follow the company closely, because it means UNC's revenues and income will be lower than the already low estimates projected as recently as two months ago, when UNC announced a major restructuring."It is a surprise," said John T. Mahoney, a stock analyst for Raymond James & Associates in St. Petersburg, Fla."
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1995
Exceeding even the rosiest expectations of Wall Street analysts, Black & Decker Corp. yesterday reported a 43 percent increase in fourth-quarter profit, boosted by strong new-product sales and more efficient operations.The Towson-based company's stock closed more than 5 percent higher on the news."They blew away everybody," said Clifford F. Ransom, director of special situation research for Raymond James & Associates Inc. in St. Petersburg, Fla. "They were a solid 10 percent above the highest estimate on the street."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2005
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Mason Hawkins, who built his money management company into the largest shareholder at Hilton Hotels Corp., took advantage of the bull market for lodging stocks by selling his entire stake, according to a regulatory filing yesterday. Southeastern Asset Management Inc., the investment advisory firm founded by Hawkins, 56, filed documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission reporting that the firm no longer holds Hilton shares. As recently as Sept. 30, Southeastern had 53 million shares, equal to 13.7 percent of Hilton's common stock outstanding.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
The U.S. economy unexpectedly slammed on the brakes in the spring, growing at an annual rate of just 3 percent, largely because of a sharp drop in consumer spending, the U.S. Department of Commerce said yesterday. The abrupt slowdown provides material for sharpened political debate as the presidential campaign shifts into overdrive. The 1 percent growth in consumer spending from April to June was the weakest since the 2001 downturn. "It's disappointing, especially considering the fact that we're still coming out of the recession, we still have a lot of excess capacity in the labor market," said Scott J. Brown, chief economist for Raymond James & Associates Inc., an investment firm in St. Petersburg, Fla. Economic expansion had been much better earlier, especially last summer, when the gross domestic product jumped 7.4 percent.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its fourth-quarter loss widened to $15.1 million as sales of its Gliadel brain-cancer treatment fell. The Baltimore company said the loss, equivalent to 50 cents per share, expanded from $13.8 million, or 46 cents per share, in the 2001 quarter. Revenue plummeted to $1.6 million from $6.8 million after buyers, who had overstocked Gliadel earlier in the year, let inventories fall back in line with demand. Analysts had expected even worse results, predicting a loss of 59 cents a share, according to the average estimate of five analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial/First Call.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
Visual Networks Inc. of Rockville said yesterday that its chief executive has resigned and that Peter Minihane has been named interim CEO. Elton King, the company's former president, CEO and director, resigned for personal reasons, the company said. Minihane, who is also a company director, has held several positions at Visual Networks. Most recently, he was the company's chief financial officer and chief operating officer until he resigned in January for personal reasons. "It was very unfortunate that he had to resign," said Todd Koffman, managing director of equity research for Raymond James & Associates in St. Petersburg, Fla. But Koffman said he sees yesterday's announcement as very favorable.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Joseph Coors Jr., a member of the family that founded Adolph Coors Co., the third-largest U.S. brewery, was swindled in a scheme in which he and others invested $40 million, the Securities and Exchange Commission said. Golden Heritage LLC, a family investment body controlled by Joseph Coors, joined in a program that promised a 100 percent return per week, the SEC alleged in a complaint filed in a federal court in San Francisco. Coors was told that his money would be invested in bank or other financial institution instruments rated AA or better, the SEC said.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. -- Eleven months ago, the Ravens left Raymond James Stadium with a firm grip around the Vince Lombardi Trophy. Last night, the defending Super Bowl champions departed empty-handed and felt their playoff chances begin to slip almost out of their grasp. Wincing from a series of pivotal mistakes, the Ravens clumsily folded late to the Tampa Buccaneers, 22-10, before 65,619. The Ravens (9-6) still can secure a playoff berth today if Seattle loses at San Diego. If the Seahawks (7-7)
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. -- Eleven months ago, the Ravens left Raymond James Stadium with a firm grip around the Vince Lombardi Trophy. Last night, the defending Super Bowl champions departed empty-handed and felt their playoff chances begin to slip almost out of their grasp. Wincing from a series of pivotal mistakes, the Ravens clumsily folded late to the Tampa Buccaneers, 22-10, before 65,619. The Ravens (9-6) still can secure a playoff berth today if Seattle loses at San Diego. If the Seahawks (7-7)
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
The Ravens have resumed their search for a corporate sponsor willing to spend millions of dollars to put its name on the new stadium at Camden Yards -- a move whose timing could work to the disadvantage of the governor who brought the team here.Team officials, who had suspended their hunt for a "naming rights" sponsor in late summer to focus on opening the stadium, say they are in discussions with several interested companies. The team denies speculation that any announcement would be postponed until after next month's election, in which Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen Sauerbrey hopes to unseat Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
SPORTS
December 29, 2001
Scouting report Ravens rushing vs. Bucs run defense -- BUCS For the Ravens to win, they will have to establish a running game to keep Tampa Bay's defensive front off-balance. In his first start in six weeks, Ravens running back Terry Allen showed some pop in his step in gaining 91 yards against the Bengals last week. But the Ravens have averaged only 77 yards per game and 3 yards a carry against teams with winning records this season. The Buccaneers are ranked 13th against the run but have been erratic the past couple of weeks.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
The Ravens have resumed their search for a corporate sponsor willing to spend millions of dollars to put its name on the new stadium at Camden Yards -- a move whose timing could work to the disadvantage of the governor who brought the team here.Team officials, who had suspended their hunt for a "naming rights" sponsor in late summer to focus on opening the stadium, say they are in discussions with several interested companies. The team denies speculation that any announcement would be postponed until after next month's election, in which Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen Sauerbrey hopes to unseat Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
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