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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
"Raymond Chandler," by Tom Hiney. Atlantic Monthly Press. 320 pages. $26."Two things stabilized him," British journalist Tom Hiney writes of Raymond Chandler in the preface to his new biography on the great detective writer. "Being drunk, which he often was, and Philip Marlowe."And of those two, only Marlowe is interesting. Luckily, Hiney appears to understand this and after 75 or so dutiful pages on Chandler's pre-Marlowe life, he finally gets down to cases.Hiney's book claims much new material, but it's the familiar material that makes Chandler's career worth reviewing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL | April 5, 2009
On March 26, the literary world marked the 50th anniversary of Raymond Chandler's death. The author of The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely was, along with Marylanders Dashiell Hammett and James M. Cain, a creator of the cynical, hard-edged private eye. His characters knew that politicians had something to hide, cops were on the take, women were dangerous distractions and whiskey kept a man sane. Chandler's writing was simple, straightforward: "I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a house in the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL | April 5, 2009
On March 26, the literary world marked the 50th anniversary of Raymond Chandler's death. The author of The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely was, along with Marylanders Dashiell Hammett and James M. Cain, a creator of the cynical, hard-edged private eye. His characters knew that politicians had something to hide, cops were on the take, women were dangerous distractions and whiskey kept a man sane. Chandler's writing was simple, straightforward: "I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a house in the country.
NEWS
By JOEL ROSE and JOEL ROSE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
Playback Raymond Chandler; adapted by Ted Benoit; ill. by Francois Ayroles; intro. by Philippe Garnier A Scanner Darkly Philip K. Dick; additional text by Harvey Pekar; book design by Laura Dumm and Gary Dumm Pantheon / 190 pages / $23.95 Beginning in the late spring and summer of 1947, and extending through the fall and into the early months of 1948, Raymond Chandler toiled over a script he would later assess as some of the best film writing he...
NEWS
By JOEL ROSE and JOEL ROSE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
Playback Raymond Chandler; adapted by Ted Benoit; ill. by Francois Ayroles; intro. by Philippe Garnier A Scanner Darkly Philip K. Dick; additional text by Harvey Pekar; book design by Laura Dumm and Gary Dumm Pantheon / 190 pages / $23.95 Beginning in the late spring and summer of 1947, and extending through the fall and into the early months of 1948, Raymond Chandler toiled over a script he would later assess as some of the best film writing he...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy -- Anne Tyler, author For all of my grownup life, I have re-read Anna Karenina every single summer. Or I used to. Then it seemed I started just saying I read it. Saying it now in print means that I will have to go back into my shelves and dig it out again. I'm looking forward to it. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill by Maud Hart Lovelace -- Laura Lippman, author The summer I was 11, I took this classic to Bethany Beach, along with six books by Walter Farley, having forgotten that I wasn't particularly interested in horses.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | October 16, 1990
If you passed him on the street -- this rakish-looking man who turns heads wherever he goes -- you would never think Andrew Vachss is a man with a social mission.Dressed in a silky green shirt, pale jacket, black boots and pegged cream-colored pants, he looks like a Hollywood producer. But then again, with that black eye patch and the small heart tattooed on his right hand -- not to mention the three-day, Don-Johnson-type beard -- he could be an international soldier of fortune. Or a jet-set wheeler-dealer.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | August 6, 1995
The body was found in a lavishly appointed study, slumped over a computer keyboard. He had been the kind of person who had a lot of enemies - a slothful ne'er-do-well, angling to get his hands on an inheritance he didn't deserve.Police were left with only one clue, a fragment of copy flickering on the computer. "Betsy, a spunky brunette, had packed up for Tierra del Fuego after the loss of her right arm made exotic dancing jobs harder to find. Little did she know that her facility with obscure Indian dialects, as well as her ability to throw her voice, would prove essential in the days to come . . ."
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 1996
"Envy," said John Gay, "is a kind of praise." With that noble sentiment in mind, I offer the following list of books, all of which have one thing in common: They make me jealous. Each is exactly the sort of book I wish I were smart enough, or imaginative enough, or talented enough, to write. Every time I reread one of these books, I get a little greener. The next time you turn to this page and find a pan with my name at the top, remember this list, and smile. I may sound cocky, but here are seven authors who leave me at the starting gate:"An Alphabet for Gourmets," by M.F.K.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | July 15, 2001
He was a 29-year-old bar owner watching a baseball game when inspiration struck. It was a sunny day in April, and from out of nowhere an inner voice spoke to Haruki Murakami right there in the bleachers, as if he'd slipped into some Tokyo remake of "Field of Dreams." "You can write," the voice said, and Murakami heeded the call. Today, at 52, he is a best seller in his home country, and probably the world's most popular Japanese novelist abroad, with a loyal and growing following in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy -- Anne Tyler, author For all of my grownup life, I have re-read Anna Karenina every single summer. Or I used to. Then it seemed I started just saying I read it. Saying it now in print means that I will have to go back into my shelves and dig it out again. I'm looking forward to it. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill by Maud Hart Lovelace -- Laura Lippman, author The summer I was 11, I took this classic to Bethany Beach, along with six books by Walter Farley, having forgotten that I wasn't particularly interested in horses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | July 15, 2001
He was a 29-year-old bar owner watching a baseball game when inspiration struck. It was a sunny day in April, and from out of nowhere an inner voice spoke to Haruki Murakami right there in the bleachers, as if he'd slipped into some Tokyo remake of "Field of Dreams." "You can write," the voice said, and Murakami heeded the call. Today, at 52, he is a best seller in his home country, and probably the world's most popular Japanese novelist abroad, with a loyal and growing following in the United States.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
Jack Manfred doesn't gamble. As he reminds us continually, he thinks people who do are fools, lazy sots who naively believe they can beat the odds. But Jack, who works as a gaming table operator at a London casino, is as much a gambler as anyone -- maybe more, since he refuses to admit it -- and the unexpected results are at the center of "Croupier," a marvelously subversive, slyly manipulative effort from British director Mike Hodges ("Get Carter," "Black...
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
"Raymond Chandler," by Tom Hiney. Atlantic Monthly Press. 320 pages. $26."Two things stabilized him," British journalist Tom Hiney writes of Raymond Chandler in the preface to his new biography on the great detective writer. "Being drunk, which he often was, and Philip Marlowe."And of those two, only Marlowe is interesting. Luckily, Hiney appears to understand this and after 75 or so dutiful pages on Chandler's pre-Marlowe life, he finally gets down to cases.Hiney's book claims much new material, but it's the familiar material that makes Chandler's career worth reviewing.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 1996
"Envy," said John Gay, "is a kind of praise." With that noble sentiment in mind, I offer the following list of books, all of which have one thing in common: They make me jealous. Each is exactly the sort of book I wish I were smart enough, or imaginative enough, or talented enough, to write. Every time I reread one of these books, I get a little greener. The next time you turn to this page and find a pan with my name at the top, remember this list, and smile. I may sound cocky, but here are seven authors who leave me at the starting gate:"An Alphabet for Gourmets," by M.F.K.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | August 6, 1995
The body was found in a lavishly appointed study, slumped over a computer keyboard. He had been the kind of person who had a lot of enemies - a slothful ne'er-do-well, angling to get his hands on an inheritance he didn't deserve.Police were left with only one clue, a fragment of copy flickering on the computer. "Betsy, a spunky brunette, had packed up for Tierra del Fuego after the loss of her right arm made exotic dancing jobs harder to find. Little did she know that her facility with obscure Indian dialects, as well as her ability to throw her voice, would prove essential in the days to come . . ."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
Jack Manfred doesn't gamble. As he reminds us continually, he thinks people who do are fools, lazy sots who naively believe they can beat the odds. But Jack, who works as a gaming table operator at a London casino, is as much a gambler as anyone -- maybe more, since he refuses to admit it -- and the unexpected results are at the center of "Croupier," a marvelously subversive, slyly manipulative effort from British director Mike Hodges ("Get Carter," "Black...
NEWS
By Melissa Grace | April 9, 1995
"Play it Again," by Stephen Humphrey Bogart. 339 pages. New York: Forge Books. $19.95This is straight up. A good read.Of course, it's not at all straight up. Stephen Humphrey Bogart is the son of Lauren Bacall and what's-a-nice-girl-like-you-doing-in-a-place-like-this Bogart. He spins a darn good private eye yarn. This book is reminiscent of the great Raymond Chandler genre tales, though with a slower hand. The story's got the necessaries, including a hard-boiled dame. It even has a pretty decent falling-in-love plot.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | October 16, 1990
If you passed him on the street -- this rakish-looking man who turns heads wherever he goes -- you would never think Andrew Vachss is a man with a social mission.Dressed in a silky green shirt, pale jacket, black boots and pegged cream-colored pants, he looks like a Hollywood producer. But then again, with that black eye patch and the small heart tattooed on his right hand -- not to mention the three-day, Don-Johnson-type beard -- he could be an international soldier of fortune. Or a jet-set wheeler-dealer.
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