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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Although "Raymond Carver" is not in any real sense a biography, as the subtitle suggests, it is still a useful and quite readable book. Compiled from interviews of those who knew the late short-story master best, this book provides an affectionate, if limited, portrait of a most intriguing artist.As editor Sam Halpert explains in the introduction, "Raymond Carver" is a reworking of the 1991 "When We Talk About Raymond Carver." This book continues with some new interviews, and all of them taken together, Mr. Halpert writes, "often contradict each other in parts as the witnesses relate the same events from different points of view.
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By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | May 1, 2005
We're in Trouble By Christopher Coake. Harcourt. 306 pages. $23. In the sizable acknowledgments section of this debut short-story collection, it is safe to say that only the dentist has been cast out of the warm circle of the author's gratitude. Christopher Coake gives the ubiquitous nod not only to current and former partners, his family, his agent, and his editor, but also to the entire writing faculty of two MFA programs, all of his fellow workshop participants in each, various faculty at undergraduate institutions, a large span of old bosses and coworkers, and -- in an especially well-caffeinated gesture -- the staff at what are presumably favorite watering holes, one Caribou Coffee and a Caffe Apropos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999
Raymond Carver1938-1988"I began as a poet," Raymond Carver said; "so I suppose on my tombstone I'd be very pleased if they put 'Poet and short story writer -- and occasional essayist.' In that order."Carver is most remembered for his short stories in which he wrote about ordinary people using spare unadorned prose.Born to a waitress and an alcoholic who worked in an Oregon sawmill, Carver was an alcoholic and heavy smoker who worked blue collar jobs and lived the life of the people he wrote about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2005
Winslow In Love By Kevin Canty. Nan A. Talese / Doubleday. 292 pages. $23.95. The drunken poet in sad decline is a stock figure in fiction (usually cruelly comic) and nowhere more so than in the little novel of academic life. We have been here before. But Kevin Canty's new novel, Winslow In Love, is not a predictable tale of goatish pedagogues or schoolmaster's high jinx. And it is never funny. From the first page of this grim story -- think Raymond Carver -- a terrible sense of dread looms, from the rainy streets of the Pacific Northwest and the seedy bar in which the book opens to the remote college in Montana where Richard Winslow, an alcoholic poet desperate for dollars, washes ashore for a semester to teach Rilke to the impressionable and go fly-fishing.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 17, 1993
New York -- He's been the next big thing and that old guy. He's been the flavor of the week and the bitter aftertaste. He's been "Get me Altman" and "I'm sorry Mr. Altman, Mr. Melnick isn't in. No, not tomorrow, either."And through it all -- a career that's stretched over three decades -- he's made movies his own way, carving out, amid the market-driven corporate culture that has come to dominate the American film industry, a complex and personal body of work, from "M*A*S*H" to "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" to "Vincent and Theo" to his new film "Short Cuts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | May 1, 2005
We're in Trouble By Christopher Coake. Harcourt. 306 pages. $23. In the sizable acknowledgments section of this debut short-story collection, it is safe to say that only the dentist has been cast out of the warm circle of the author's gratitude. Christopher Coake gives the ubiquitous nod not only to current and former partners, his family, his agent, and his editor, but also to the entire writing faculty of two MFA programs, all of his fellow workshop participants in each, various faculty at undergraduate institutions, a large span of old bosses and coworkers, and -- in an especially well-caffeinated gesture -- the staff at what are presumably favorite watering holes, one Caribou Coffee and a Caffe Apropos.
NEWS
By GERRI KOBREN TALENTS AND TECHNICIANS: LITERARY CHIC AND THE NEW ASSEMBLY-LINE FICTION. John W. Aldridge. Scribner's. 162 pages. $24.95. and GERRI KOBREN TALENTS AND TECHNICIANS: LITERARY CHIC AND THE NEW ASSEMBLY-LINE FICTION. John W. Aldridge. Scribner's. 162 pages. $24.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES TWISTER. John Lantigua. Simon & Schuster. 269 pages. $18 | April 26, 1992
THE TORCHING.Marcy Heidish.Simon & Schuster.236 pages. $19. Marcy Heidish gets "The Torching" off to a fine, goose-pimply beginning as Alice Grey, a novelist and bookstore owner, dreams of shadowy figures with torches, smells smoke and hears a high-pitched wailing. And wakes from her dream to find smoke alarms shrieking for no reason.Alice has been writing a novel about a midwife in Southern Maryland during the Colonial period: Evangeline Smith was accused of murder and witchcraft when a mutilated body was found in her chimney, and the townspeople burned her house down, with her in it. Alice has been planning to portray Evangeline as handmaiden to the devil, but now she decides something wants her to set the record straight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2005
Winslow In Love By Kevin Canty. Nan A. Talese / Doubleday. 292 pages. $23.95. The drunken poet in sad decline is a stock figure in fiction (usually cruelly comic) and nowhere more so than in the little novel of academic life. We have been here before. But Kevin Canty's new novel, Winslow In Love, is not a predictable tale of goatish pedagogues or schoolmaster's high jinx. And it is never funny. From the first page of this grim story -- think Raymond Carver -- a terrible sense of dread looms, from the rainy streets of the Pacific Northwest and the seedy bar in which the book opens to the remote college in Montana where Richard Winslow, an alcoholic poet desperate for dollars, washes ashore for a semester to teach Rilke to the impressionable and go fly-fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
The mark of an artist may be how simple he makes the complex look.That's the key virtue of Robert Altman's brilliant "Short Cuts," which, on the way to being many things, is certainly the shortest 3-hour movie ever made. But it has a degree of pure simplicity to it -- unseen in American films in many a year -- in the way it deals with small issues honestly. And under its smooth surface, one senses the movement of large and troubling ideas.And it's a great piece of storytelling. It glides with such dapper effervescence that it comes to feel truly magical, and its considerable technique is completely yoked to the thrust of the dramatic materials.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | November 29, 2007
Madison Smartt Bell, a novelist and an English professor at Goucher College, has received a $250,000 literary award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the association announced yesterday. The 2008 Strauss Living Award -- which is distributed in $50,000 installments over five years -- was also awarded to California novelist and journalist William T. Vollmann. The prize comes with strings attached: Recipients must agree to forgo "positions of paid employment" during the award's five-year term.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999
Raymond Carver1938-1988"I began as a poet," Raymond Carver said; "so I suppose on my tombstone I'd be very pleased if they put 'Poet and short story writer -- and occasional essayist.' In that order."Carver is most remembered for his short stories in which he wrote about ordinary people using spare unadorned prose.Born to a waitress and an alcoholic who worked in an Oregon sawmill, Carver was an alcoholic and heavy smoker who worked blue collar jobs and lived the life of the people he wrote about.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Although "Raymond Carver" is not in any real sense a biography, as the subtitle suggests, it is still a useful and quite readable book. Compiled from interviews of those who knew the late short-story master best, this book provides an affectionate, if limited, portrait of a most intriguing artist.As editor Sam Halpert explains in the introduction, "Raymond Carver" is a reworking of the 1991 "When We Talk About Raymond Carver." This book continues with some new interviews, and all of them taken together, Mr. Halpert writes, "often contradict each other in parts as the witnesses relate the same events from different points of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
The mark of an artist may be how simple he makes the complex look.That's the key virtue of Robert Altman's brilliant "Short Cuts," which, on the way to being many things, is certainly the shortest 3-hour movie ever made. But it has a degree of pure simplicity to it -- unseen in American films in many a year -- in the way it deals with small issues honestly. And under its smooth surface, one senses the movement of large and troubling ideas.And it's a great piece of storytelling. It glides with such dapper effervescence that it comes to feel truly magical, and its considerable technique is completely yoked to the thrust of the dramatic materials.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 17, 1993
New York -- He's been the next big thing and that old guy. He's been the flavor of the week and the bitter aftertaste. He's been "Get me Altman" and "I'm sorry Mr. Altman, Mr. Melnick isn't in. No, not tomorrow, either."And through it all -- a career that's stretched over three decades -- he's made movies his own way, carving out, amid the market-driven corporate culture that has come to dominate the American film industry, a complex and personal body of work, from "M*A*S*H" to "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" to "Vincent and Theo" to his new film "Short Cuts."
NEWS
By GERRI KOBREN TALENTS AND TECHNICIANS: LITERARY CHIC AND THE NEW ASSEMBLY-LINE FICTION. John W. Aldridge. Scribner's. 162 pages. $24.95. and GERRI KOBREN TALENTS AND TECHNICIANS: LITERARY CHIC AND THE NEW ASSEMBLY-LINE FICTION. John W. Aldridge. Scribner's. 162 pages. $24.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES TWISTER. John Lantigua. Simon & Schuster. 269 pages. $18 | April 26, 1992
THE TORCHING.Marcy Heidish.Simon & Schuster.236 pages. $19. Marcy Heidish gets "The Torching" off to a fine, goose-pimply beginning as Alice Grey, a novelist and bookstore owner, dreams of shadowy figures with torches, smells smoke and hears a high-pitched wailing. And wakes from her dream to find smoke alarms shrieking for no reason.Alice has been writing a novel about a midwife in Southern Maryland during the Colonial period: Evangeline Smith was accused of murder and witchcraft when a mutilated body was found in her chimney, and the townspeople burned her house down, with her in it. Alice has been planning to portray Evangeline as handmaiden to the devil, but now she decides something wants her to set the record straight.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | May 22, 1992
Robert Altman, who last week won the best-director prize at the Cannes Film Festival -- where his "The Player" also won Tim Robbins a best-actor nod -- has lined up financing for two new projects. One, "L.A. Short Cuts," is an intertwining of several Raymond Carver short stories; "Player" alums Peter Gallagher, Andie MacDowell, Jack Lemmon, Lily Tomlin and Lyle Lovett are committed to the film, as is Jeff Daniels.The other, "Pret a Porter, will be the director's take on the fashion industry.
FEATURES
By Valerie Takahama and Valerie Takahama,Orange County Register | January 2, 1994
In her lecture as recipient of the 1993 Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison said it is language -- "in its reach toward the ineffable" -- that allows us to make sense of our existence."
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