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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
As he carried the Lombardi Trophy to midfield after the Super Bowl Sunday, past a double row of giddy and groping New York Giants, Raymond Berry felt their glee. "They (players) were in another world," said Berry, 78. "As I watched them touch the trophy, and kiss it, the emotion of the experience was written all over those boys' faces. Winning the championship is a once-in-a-lifetime thing, and I could identify with them. I've been there. " Fifty-four years ago, Berry led the Baltimore Colts to their first NFL title, a 23-17 sudden-death victory over the Giants.
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Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Charley Winner doesn't take old age lying down. At 90, the former Baltimore Colts coach plays tennis five times a week, for 90 minutes a day. "That's about all I can stand," Winner said from his home in South Fort Myers, Fla. "All of us in the group are 70-and-up. We all like to win, but nobody argues about points. Life's too short. " A defensive coach for the Colts for 12 seasons, Winner is the last surviving coach of either team from the 1958 NFL championship, dubbed "The Greatest Game Ever Played.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
He has two NFL championship rings, a bronze bust that sits in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the gratitude of Baltimore Colts fans who saw him play. Today, before 900 students at a high school assembly in his hometown, Raymond Berry will receive a plaque acknowledging the accomplishments of the skinny, near-sighted kid from Paris, Texas. It's a stirring honor for Berry, 79, one of the greatest receivers of all time. He can guess the audience's reaction. "The kids will sit there, look at each other and say, 'Who the hell is this?
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Prior to The Game on Sunday, Anthony Mitchell made a bold forecast on Facebook. The former Raven posted photos of both his 2000 jersey and his Super Bowl ring with this decree: Time to get another one. The Ravens obliged. Why did Mitchell share his entry? "Once a Raven, always a Raven," said Mitchell, 38, a former defensive back. "Play for that team and you always have a special bond with Baltimore. " Ever since the Super Bowl , folks who know Kim Herring have sidled up, pumped his hand and offered their congratulations.
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By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When the phone call came, asking if he would present the silver trophy at the Super Bowl in February, Raymond Berry took it for a prank. "You've got to be kidding," he told the caller. "Is this a joke?" Frank Supowitz, the NFL's senior vice president of events, assured Berry that the offer was legit. The league wanted the Baltimore Colts Hall of Fame receiver to take part in the post-game ceremonies, with the world watching, at Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis on Feb. 5. Berry said yes and hung up, agog.
SPORTS
By Curt Sylvester and Curt Sylvester,Knight-Ridder | February 19, 1991
PONTIAC, Mich. -- Raymond Berry, a Hall of Fame receiver and a Super Bowl coach, was hired yesterday as the Detroit Lions' new quarterbacks coach.That's right -- quarterbacks.No, Berry has never coached quarterbacks.No, he's not at all familiar with Lions quarterbacks Rodney Peete or Andre Ware.No, he has no working knowledge of the run-and-shoot offense, although he did see the Lions play on television a couple of times last season.And, yes, coach Wayne Fontes was aware of those factors when he gave Berry the job."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 3, 1991
The Redskins were stacking touchdowns on the Detroit Lions on Sunday night at RFK Stadium, and I kept coming back to this phone conversation I'd had with Raymond Berry's wife in July.I'd had reason to speak to Berry, who caught hundreds of Johnny Unitas' passes and later coached the New England Patriots, and tracked him down in Detroit, where he is now the Lions' quarterback coach. It was 9:30 on a weeknight. His wife answered the phone."You'll never get him here," she said. "He leaves at 6 in the morning and comes home at midnight."
SPORTS
December 21, 2008
Today we examine the year 1958 and what it was like in Baltimore and New York around the historic Dec. 28, 1958, game between the Colts and Giants. As the 50th anniversary approaches, we'll look at the game through the eyes of those who played in it and those who watched it at Yankee Stadium. In addition to The Baltimore Sun's coverage the next week, there will be events in Baltimore commemorating the game: Tuesday The Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards is opening an exhibit honoring Baltimore's first football champions, the 1958 Baltimore Colts, and celebrating the 50th anniversary of "The Greatest Game Ever Played."
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | April 21, 2008
Philip M. Prestianni, a retired optical lens crafter who designed a prescription face-mask shield worn during games by Baltimore Colts receiver Raymond Berry, died Wednesday at his home in Gardenville. He was 90. Mr. Prestianni was the third of eight children born to Signorino and Basilia Prestianni in their Camden Street home. He graduated in 1937 from City College, where, family members said, his interest in the vision industry began. A year later, Mr. Prestianni started working at New City Optical.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
For Mark Bowden, writing a book about the 1958 pro football championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants was a return to his roots. Bowden made his name writing prize-winning articles for The Philadelphia Inquirer and best-selling books such as Black Hawk Down, his reconstruction of a disastrous U.S. military raid in Somalia, and Killing Pablo, his chronicle of the manhunt for Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. But before all that came Baltimore. Bowden was 13 when his family moved to town in the mid-1960s.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
Dec. 28, 2003: The Ravens (10-6) win their first division title, turning back the visiting Pittsburgh Steelers, 13-10 in overtime. Jamal Lewis rushes for 114 yards and a touchdown to become the fifth player in NFL history to rush for more than 2,000 yards in a season. Dec. 26, 1999: "I can humbly say that I feel like I'm pretty good," Matt Stover says after kicking five field goals in the host Ravens' 22-0 victory over Cincinnati Bengals. Stover has hit 17 in a row, including four of 44 yards or more.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
He has two NFL championship rings, a bronze bust that sits in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the gratitude of Baltimore Colts fans who saw him play. Today, before 900 students at a high school assembly in his hometown, Raymond Berry will receive a plaque acknowledging the accomplishments of the skinny, near-sighted kid from Paris, Texas. It's a stirring honor for Berry, 79, one of the greatest receivers of all time. He can guess the audience's reaction. "The kids will sit there, look at each other and say, 'Who the hell is this?
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
As he carried the Lombardi Trophy to midfield after the Super Bowl Sunday, past a double row of giddy and groping New York Giants, Raymond Berry felt their glee. "They (players) were in another world," said Berry, 78. "As I watched them touch the trophy, and kiss it, the emotion of the experience was written all over those boys' faces. Winning the championship is a once-in-a-lifetime thing, and I could identify with them. I've been there. " Fifty-four years ago, Berry led the Baltimore Colts to their first NFL title, a 23-17 sudden-death victory over the Giants.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Raymond Berry can't fathom the odds. Who'd have thought that, the same year he was asked to present the Vince Lombardi Trophy, the two locales most dear to his heart would be playing on Sunday for a Super Bowl berth? That's Baltimore, the town Berry helped win two world championships as a Colts receiver, and New England, the club he later coached to the Super Bowl. Either the Ravens or Patriots will advance Sunday to the big game, giving Berry a rooting bias in Indianapolis two weeks hence.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When the phone call came, asking if he would present the silver trophy at the Super Bowl in February, Raymond Berry took it for a prank. "You've got to be kidding," he told the caller. "Is this a joke?" Frank Supowitz, the NFL's senior vice president of events, assured Berry that the offer was legit. The league wanted the Baltimore Colts Hall of Fame receiver to take part in the post-game ceremonies, with the world watching, at Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis on Feb. 5. Berry said yes and hung up, agog.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Sitting on stage alongside his aging teammates, having dinner during the Sports Legend Museum induction at Martin's West Tuesday night, 85-year-old Gino Marchetti will chew on this: "It's amazing to me that, after all these years, people are still thinking of us," Marchetti, the Baltimore Colts' Hall of Fame defensive end, said. "I always figured that I'd play football for a few years, go home to Antioch (Calif.) and work in the mill until I turned 65, then go fishing. But, God almighty, the people of Baltimore want to keep promoting us. "The fans were always great in this town.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 25, 1993
This was a homecoming for Raymond Berry, who was such a remarkable young man that some teammates, given to a torrent of profanity, would clean up their language when he approached. That was the ultimate sign of respect.Berry didn't "wear religion on his sleeve" and wasn't about to force personal beliefs on others. He was, though, an extraordinary man and football player, graduating from SMU before a 13-year career as a pass receiver with the Baltimore Colts earned him enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By Bob Oates and Bob Oates,Los Angeles Times | June 9, 1991
Before and after football practice each day, Johnny Unitas spent hour after patient hour creating a football player -- a Hall of Fame-bound quarterback -- a guy named Johnny Unitas.That was 40 years ago. On the playgrounds and practice fields of his time.There, morning, afternoon and evening, Unitas at first aimed for -- and then played for -- the old Baltimore Colts.Endowed with no more than modest talent, he built himself into the National Football League's most famous self-made quarterback by endlessly repeating every little thing that the good ones try to do on every play.
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