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Ray Rice

NEWS
September 17, 2014
We've heard about Ray Rice, the NFL and the Ravens ad nauseam. Enough already! Yvonne Wenger and Aaron Wilson's article about Ray and his wife going to a high school football game is still front page news in the Sports section ( "Ray Rice, wife make first public appearance since release of elevator video," Sept. 13), but is there anything that could be less important? Marvin Oed, Cockeysville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The NFL Players Association filed a grievance on behalf of former Ravens running back Ray Rice on Tuesday night, demanding that the increased discipline of an indefinite suspension levied last week by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell be overturned. This high-profile situation stems from Rice being arrested in February and later charged with felony aggravated assault for punching his then-fiancee in an elevator of an Atlantic City casino. The players' union also requested that Goodell recuse himself from hearing the appeal because he would likely be a witness after stating in a disciplinary letter that he indefinitely suspended Rice based on new video evidence that surfaced a week ago. “This action taken by our union is to protect the due process rights of all NFL players,” the NFLPA said in a statement.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When Ravens coach John Harbaugh scanned the audience in the team auditorium Monday afternoon, the scene was dramatically different than it was for much of last week. There weren't multiple rows of television cameras to chronicle his responses to questions about Ray Rice, a player who was no longer in the organization. There weren't dozens of media outlets represented in the room, few of them interested in talking about a football game. The attention surrounding Rice's release and the way the organization and the NFL handled the running back's assault on his then-fiancee was not the overwhelming topic of conversation at the team facility Monday after it dominated dialogue around the Ravens last week.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
Women have a duty to combat the domestic violence in the NFL by refusing to buy the products of any football advertiser ( "Domestic violence deserves attention year round," Sept. 12). Cut off their money. Men have the same duty. We oppose violence, but in addition, we have here a conspiracy to thwart justice - by the Baltimore Ravens, by the New Jersey prosecutor and judge and by the NFL along with total silence on the part of every Maryland leader from Gov. Martin O'Malley to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
I joined Christine Brennan, of "USA Today," and Howard Kurtz on "Media Buzz" today to talk about TMZ and the performance of mainstream media in covering -- or not covering -- the Ray Rice story. I was at first surpised to hear Brennan, who knows this turf as well as anyone, say an argument could be made that it is "the biggest controversy to ever hit a U.S. sports league. " But having thought about it since, I think she could be right. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
September 15, 2014
It seems to me that the NFL and the Baltimore Ravens' staff are severely lacking in management skills ( "Ravens executives address Ray Rice investigation in exclusive interview," Sept. 10). I believe that most people feel that consistency is the key to good management. You can be a micro-manager or laissez-faire one as either can be a great manager but if your employees do not know what to expect whether it be to go hard one day and easy the next, one is judged as having poor management skills.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
America, it's time to call it quits on the witch hunts. As my husband wrote on Facebook recently, more people have spent way more time hating Ray Rice than they have spent hating the ISIS folks who beheaded two innocent American sons ( "NFL investigation into Ray Rice video raises more questions ," Sept. 11). If it weren't for an elevator camera, no one would know about this particular bit of human ugliness between Ray and his wife. I can tell you right now that I thank heaven for the lack of elevator cameras in some of my moments in life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If not for TMZ, Ray Rice would still be a Raven today and back in the National Football League, having served his joke of a two-game suspension from commissioner Roger Goodell. The assault on his then-fiancee in an elevator at a New Jersey casino would be largely behind him - with the public never having seen the brutality he inflicted upon her. And the wide-ranging discussion about domestic violence that took place several nights last week at the top of network evening newscasts and all day and night on cable news channels would in all likelihood never have happened.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
For the second time since a graphic video surfaced of former Ravens running back Ray Rice punching Janay Rice in a casino elevator, retired linebacker and ESPN NFL analyst Ray Lewis has commented on the domestic-violence incident. Rice's $35 million contract was terminated by the Ravens on Monday. He has been indefinitely suspended by the NFL. "This is a tragic situation what Ray Rice did was inexcusable," Lewis said Sunday morning on ESPN's Sunday NFL Countdown. "There's no room in our world for what we've seen.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
In the matter of Ray Rice, it seems like every spokesperson for the Ravens organization has lost their ability to think logically and analytically about what just happened. Let's look at a few simple facts: First, the release of the elevator video did not make things worse than they were. Second, the judicial system in New Jersey took carefully considered measures against Mr. Rice long ago and, third, the punishment then meted out by the NFL and the Ravens far exceeds the NFL's own standard for a first offense.
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