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Ray Rice

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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 18, 2014
"I think they're going too far with Ray Rice. " So said a civil servant I know only in passing, making small talk the other day. No, it is not the majority opinion, but neither is the guy alone. Last week, USA Today quoted women fans who pointedly support Rice, the NFL star dropped by the Baltimore Ravens and indefinitely suspended by the league this month for a February incident in which he cold-cocked his then-fiancee (now wife) Janay Palmer. "I've met the guy," said one. "He's such a sweet guy. " "I'm supporting him all the way around," said another woman, herself a survivor of domestic abuse.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
As a 92-year-old great grandmother, I have this to say about the Ray Rice situation: Ray Lewis gets a statue. Ray Rice gets the shaft. While it is impossible to ignore the detestable action caught on videotape, the outrage and vitriol seem more a product of our vicious social media-driven culture than an honest reaction to a grievous event. These media people put a flock of vultures to shame. What happened to Ray Rice is more about PR damage control - and money - for the NFL and for the Ravens than about a measured response to an admittedly horrific act. What about redemption?
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Recently we have often been asked: What if your daughter had been in Janay Rice's shoes, wouldn't you demand stern justice? As the mother of a daughter, the answer is that of course I would. However, I am also the mother of a son. Why don't we hear the question: What if your son had been in Ray Rice's shoes? If my son had been in that position, I would demand stern justice as well. However, I would demand justice to be rational and consider that - by all accounts - there had been no pattern of abuse and that, also certainly relevant, there had been a long-time and consistent pattern of exemplary community service and outreach by Mr. Rice.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
I will not pretend to be a legal expert. That being said, I take a stance on the Ray Rice issue because I believe that the hypocrisy is slightly annoying ( "Ravens bungled the Ray Rice case from start to finish," Sept. 17). I have no doubt in my mind and fully agree that Ray Rice committed a crime. He should accept the repercussions that come along with his actions. However, it is something that should be left to the discretion of the legal system, not the NFL. The NFL is by nature an organization that is prominent because they provide entertainment to us, the viewers.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
On Monday September 8, two off-field events in the world of sports garnered more attention than any competition on the field: the Baltimore Ravens released Ray Rice, whom the NFL suspended indefinitely; and the NCAA lifted its postseason and scholarship ban on Penn State University's football team. These two events teach an important lesson about the fine line of acceptability in the very public world of professional and collegiate football. Looking first at the NFL, on Monday TMZ released a full video from inside the elevator of Mr. Rice punching his then-fiancée in the face.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Finally, someone can see through the phony NFL, the Ravens and their hypocritical "Shield of Honor. " Scott Green from Chicago in his letter in Saturday's Baltimore Sun ( "What the Ravens should have done," Sept. 13) had a contrarian view on the Ray Rice episode, but I believe he was dead on correct. The Ravens turned their backs on a "family" member and their "brother. " Not much in the way of condemnation came from any of Mr. Rice's teammates, for "people who live in glass houses," and you know the rest.
FEATURES
Tanika Davis, For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
It's been almost two weeks since the elevator footage of former Ravens running back Ray Rice blew up the Internet. And I can't stop thinking about it. There are many reasons why the Rices' domestic-abuse video troubles me, but selfishly, I'll admit that the entire thing makes me think most about my own children. My husband and I have two boys, twins. We also have a daughter. So I've taken note of the reactions both to Rice's stunning brutality, to his then-fiancee's you-and-me-against-the-world response and to the legions of people on Twitter explaining why they stayed with their abusers (#WhyIStayed)
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Win or lose, when the Ravens play the score is front-page, above-the-fold news in big headlines. Ray Rice and his foibles received the same treatment. Meanwhile, the Orioles are in a serious playoff race for the first time in more than a decade and pennant fever is taking hold. But you'd never know that from reading The Sun. The only Orioles news to make an above-the-fold, front-page appearance was Chris Davis' troubles. The Orioles magic number? Oh, it's front page, all right: in the sports section, that is, and below the fold.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Ray Rice should be removed from football. He made a mistake and if he is sorry and repents we should forgive him for it. But he should never again play in the NFL. What he did was shameful to every woman and child in America. American women should rise up if the NFL tries in any way to reinstate Mr. Rice. His was a moral offense to our country that must not be repeated. David Brian - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
In an organization that relies heavily on the acceptable behavior of its employees to support its mission, there are generally accepted ways to deal with a crisis. First, if an employee is found to be in violation of the "acceptable behavior," deal with it immediately. The Ravens were told by the NFL that Ray Rice was suspended without pay for two games. Last Monday, after the video tape of Mr. Rice hitting his wife in an elevator became public, the Ravens terminated his contract.
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