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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
I am so angry right now, I should get a two-game suspension. The National Football League and the Baltimore Ravens have sacrificed running back Ray Rice on the altar of their public image. His firing was cynical and expedient and has absolutely nothing to do with domestic abuse. As soon as video from inside the casino elevator was made public - confirming what we already knew from the police report, that Rice hit his then-fiancee hard enough to knock her unconscious - the team terminated his contract.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 18, 2014
"I think they're going too far with Ray Rice. " So said a civil servant I know only in passing, making small talk the other day. No, it is not the majority opinion, but neither is the guy alone. Last week, USA Today quoted women fans who pointedly support Rice, the NFL star dropped by the Baltimore Ravens and indefinitely suspended by the league this month for a February incident in which he cold-cocked his then-fiancee (now wife) Janay Palmer. "I've met the guy," said one. "He's such a sweet guy. " "I'm supporting him all the way around," said another woman, herself a survivor of domestic abuse.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
A day after he was indicted on charges of third-degree aggravated assault for allegedly knocking his fiancée unconscious, Ravens running back Ray Rice and Janay Palmer got married. Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith said today that he visited Rice and Palmer after Friday's ceremony and they are "in a good place. " "Everyone knows that we're tight. I'm tight with Ray, I'm tight with Janay. He is like a brother to me and she's like a sister to me and my wife as well," Smith said at his charity basketball game.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
As a 92-year-old great grandmother, I have this to say about the Ray Rice situation: Ray Lewis gets a statue. Ray Rice gets the shaft. While it is impossible to ignore the detestable action caught on videotape, the outrage and vitriol seem more a product of our vicious social media-driven culture than an honest reaction to a grievous event. These media people put a flock of vultures to shame. What happened to Ray Rice is more about PR damage control - and money - for the NFL and for the Ravens than about a measured response to an admittedly horrific act. What about redemption?
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger and Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Ray Rice and his wife, Janay, on Saturday made their first public appearance since a video surfaced Monday showing the former star Ravens running back knocking her out in a casino elevator and he was suspended indefinitely by the NFL. The couple returned to the place where Rice was once a celebrated all-state player - his hometown of New Rochelle, N.Y. - to see his former high school football team play Ramapo of Spring Valley, N.Y. Rice was...
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
She is the girl from a rundown neighborhood who became class president at a posh prep school. A quiet and driven Towson University student. An adoring mother. One of the unofficial leaders of the sisterhood of wives and girlfriends of Ravens teammates. Janay Ashley Rice is also a woman America has seen knocked unconscious by the man she loves. The grainy clip of her now-husband, former Ravens running back Ray Rice, punching her in an elevator has been played repeatedly on national media in the past week.
SPORTS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
  Ravens running back Ray Rice has been accepted into a diversionary program that could allow him to clear his record of charges that he knocked his then-fiancee unconscious in a New Jersey casino, but he could still face discipline from the NFL.   Rice, 27, earlier this month pleaded not guilty to one count of third-degree aggravated assault and instead sought entry into a pre-trial intervention program for first-time offenders....
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Should we be happy for them? Ray Rice and the former Janay Palmer, his longtime girlfriend and mother of his two-year-old daughter, celebrated their marriage last week at the Four Seasons Baltimore in front of friends, including fellow Ravens Torrey Smith and Lardarius Webb.  Rice and Palmer, you may recall, were married in a private ceremony in March, a day after he was indicted on third-degree assault charges for allegedly knocking her...
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
For the second time since a graphic video surfaced of former Ravens running back Ray Rice punching Janay Rice in a casino elevator, retired linebacker and ESPN NFL analyst Ray Lewis has commented on the domestic-violence incident. Rice's $35 million contract was terminated by the Ravens on Monday. He has been indefinitely suspended by the NFL. "This is a tragic situation what Ray Rice did was inexcusable," Lewis said Sunday morning on ESPN's Sunday NFL Countdown. "There's no room in our world for what we've seen.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
In an emotional message, the wife of former Ravens running back Ray Rice broke her silence Tuesday morning, one day after Rice's contract was terminated and he was indefinitely suspended by the NFL. Those events followed a graphic video surfacing in which Rice punched his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer, whom he later married and now has his last name. The couple has been in counseling since the incident in February, which occurred at Revel Casino, which has since closed, in Atlantic City, N.J. The Baltimore Sun has verified that the following unabridged message from her official Instagram account is from Janay Rice and was intended to be released publicly: "I woke up this morning feeling like I had a horrible nightmare, feeling like I'm mourning the death of my closest friend," Janay Rice wrote.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
On Monday September 8, two off-field events in the world of sports garnered more attention than any competition on the field: the Baltimore Ravens released Ray Rice, whom the NFL suspended indefinitely; and the NCAA lifted its postseason and scholarship ban on Penn State University's football team. These two events teach an important lesson about the fine line of acceptability in the very public world of professional and collegiate football. Looking first at the NFL, on Monday TMZ released a full video from inside the elevator of Mr. Rice punching his then-fiancée in the face.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
In response to Scott Green's letter, "The Ravens got it wrong" (Sept. 13), it seems unfair to criticize Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti for not supporting Ray and Janay Rice after the violent video came to light. Mr. Bisciotti is considered an influential business leader in the community. His decision was forced by his viewing of and by public release of the violent video. One can argue that the Ravens could and should have done more to obtain the tape sooner, but that doesn't change the fact that Ray Rice and only Ray Rice threw that violent punch.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Where are the men and women who have committed heinous acts but have surmounted obstacles and turned their lives around? They must be out there and could tell their stories. Michael Vick, where are you? Although I do not condone domestic violence, Ray and Janay Rice were and are working hard to create a new life and still deserve that chance. Jacquelyn L. Fried, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Recently we have often been asked: What if your daughter had been in Janay Rice's shoes, wouldn't you demand stern justice? As the mother of a daughter, the answer is that of course I would. However, I am also the mother of a son. Why don't we hear the question: What if your son had been in Ray Rice's shoes? If my son had been in that position, I would demand stern justice as well. However, I would demand justice to be rational and consider that - by all accounts - there had been no pattern of abuse and that, also certainly relevant, there had been a long-time and consistent pattern of exemplary community service and outreach by Mr. Rice.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Finally, someone can see through the phony NFL, the Ravens and their hypocritical "Shield of Honor. " Scott Green from Chicago in his letter in Saturday's Baltimore Sun ( "What the Ravens should have done," Sept. 13) had a contrarian view on the Ray Rice episode, but I believe he was dead on correct. The Ravens turned their backs on a "family" member and their "brother. " Not much in the way of condemnation came from any of Mr. Rice's teammates, for "people who live in glass houses," and you know the rest.
FEATURES
By Tanika Davis, For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
It's been almost two weeks since the elevator footage of former Ravens running back Ray Rice blew up the Internet. And I can't stop thinking about it. There are many reasons why the Rices' domestic-abuse video troubles me, but selfishly, I'll admit that the entire thing makes me think most about my own children. My husband and I have two boys, twins. We also have a daughter. So I've taken note of the reactions both to Rice's stunning brutality, to his then-fiancee's you-and-me-against-the-world response and to the legions of people on Twitter explaining why they stayed with their abusers (#WhyIStayed)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
The Ravens are standing by Ray Rice no longer. After months of publicly supporting the much-maligned running back, the Ravens terminated Rice's contract Monday afternoon on the same day video surfaced of him striking his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer, in an Atlantic City, N.J. casino elevator in February. The decision came after a morning meeting with Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, team president Dick Cass, general manager Ozzie Newsome and head coach John Harbaugh. “It was not a long meeting and we came to the decision that we came to, to release Ray,” Harbaugh said at a Monday evening news conference following the team's walk-through practice.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice has been charged with aggravated assault in the February incident in which he is accused of knocking his fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City casino elevator, a more serious charge than he originally faced. Rice, 27, initially faced a charge of simple assault for striking Janay Palmer in the Revel Casino, an incident that authorities say was caught on tape. Prosecutors in Atlantic County, N.J., reviewed the case for several weeks before presenting it to a grand jury, which handed up the indictment, officials said.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The Ravens on Thursday announced details of this weekend's Ray Rice jersey exchange, which will allow fans to turn in their No. 27 jerseys for another, following the former star running back's release last week. Rice was charged with aggravated assault stemming from a February incident with his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, in which Rice knocked her unconscious in an Atlantic City, N.J. elevator. Rice was initially suspended for two games by the NFL, but he was released by the Ravens and suspended indefinitely by the league after TMZ posted footage of the incident last week.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
I will not pretend to be a legal expert. That being said, I take a stance on the Ray Rice issue because I believe that the hypocrisy is slightly annoying ( "Ravens bungled the Ray Rice case from start to finish," Sept. 17). I have no doubt in my mind and fully agree that Ray Rice committed a crime. He should accept the repercussions that come along with his actions. However, it is something that should be left to the discretion of the legal system, not the NFL. The NFL is by nature an organization that is prominent because they provide entertainment to us, the viewers.
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