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By HOWARD WITT and HOWARD WITT,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2006
NEW ORLEANS -- In the end, New Orleans voters decided to forgive their erratic mayor rather than punish him. And there was a lot to forgive. In the nearly nine months since Hurricane Katrina pummeled this city, Mayor Ray Nagin has committed enough strategic blunders, uttered enough verbal gaffes and hastened enough policy reversals to have sunk the career of any ordinary politician. As the hurricane bore down on the city Aug. 29, Nagin failed to arrange for the evacuation of the city's poor, stranding thousands when the levees burst.
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By HOWARD WITT and HOWARD WITT,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2006
NEW ORLEANS -- In the end, New Orleans voters decided to forgive their erratic mayor rather than punish him. And there was a lot to forgive. In the nearly nine months since Hurricane Katrina pummeled this city, Mayor Ray Nagin has committed enough strategic blunders, uttered enough verbal gaffes and hastened enough policy reversals to have sunk the career of any ordinary politician. As the hurricane bore down on the city Aug. 29, Nagin failed to arrange for the evacuation of the city's poor, stranding thousands when the levees burst.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2006
NEW ORLEANS -- Mayor Ray Nagin -- the shoot-from-the-hip maverick believed buried in the political rubble of Hurricane Katrina and by his declaration that New Orleans was ordained to be a "chocolate city" -- won another term yesterday to lead the historic recovery of his storm-ravaged hometown. In a close election where race played a bigger role than rebuilding plans, Nagin defeated Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu, the son of the Crescent City's last white mayor. The mayor won overwhelmingly in the predominantly African-American precincts and ran strongly enough in the white neighborhoods to patch together a majority.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2006
NEW ORLEANS -- Mayor Ray Nagin -- the shoot-from-the-hip maverick believed buried in the political rubble of Hurricane Katrina and by his declaration that New Orleans was ordained to be a "chocolate city" -- won another term yesterday to lead the historic recovery of his storm-ravaged hometown. In a close election where race played a bigger role than rebuilding plans, Nagin defeated Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu, the son of the Crescent City's last white mayor. The mayor won overwhelmingly in the predominantly African-American precincts and ran strongly enough in the white neighborhoods to patch together a majority.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2005
NEW ORLEANS - A day after two police suicides and the abrupt resignations or desertions of up to 200 police officers, defiant city officials yesterday began offering five-day vacations - and even trips to Las Vegas - to the police, firefighters and city emergency workers and their families. The idea of paid vacations was raised by Mayor Ray Nagin and senior police officials, who said that their forces were exhausted and traumatized and that the arrival of the National Guard had made way for the officers to be relieved.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 27, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- Mayor C. Ray Nagin, seeking to reassure his city, provided an update yesterday on steps being taken to combat a surge in violent crime - including increasing the use of surveillance cameras, placing more police on foot patrols and setting up a blitz of traffic checkpoints. But many residents, frightened and angered by the crime that has left at least 14 dead since Jan. 1, said they were reserving judgment on the initiatives until they produce concrete results. The mayor said that 50 cameras were operational and that within the next two months, 20 other crime "hot spots" would be placed under surveillance.
NEWS
September 3, 2008
The Bush administration, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin took the hurricane warnings seriously and put the power of government solidly behind efforts to protect citizens and secure the Big Easy. And then Hurricane Gustav cooperated by delivering a less-forceful blow to the region Monday. What a relief and a lesson in the benefits of emergency preparedness. New Orleans is a demonstrably different city than it was before Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast three years ago, exposing the incompetence of city, state and federal officials who were ill-prepared to deal with its aftermath.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | August 6, 2006
HE SOCIAL SCENE HAS BEEN hot and it has nothing to do with the weather. We've had notable speakers such as Maya Angelou, who came to town in May as part of The Sun's Headlines & Biographies series. Angelou, who is in her 70s, is one of the most dynamic speakers I've ever heard. She enthralled the audience at the Lyric Opera House with stories about the people in her life that have made her journey, thus far, very rich. I had a personal audience with her, which was a real treat. June was full of events such as a local Juneteenth event and a South Africa documentary film festival in Washington.
NEWS
By MARY CURTIUS and MARY CURTIUS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco gave no ground to Capitol Hill critics yesterday, saying she and other state officials did all they could to save lives after Hurricane Katrina and that she feared Congress' focus on missteps was an excuse to deny more money for reconstruction. Blanco offered her first public accounting to Congress on her handling of the crisis as House and Senate negotiators wrangled over a new aid package for the states hit by the powerful storm.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | September 5, 2008
NEW ORLEANS - A Federal Emergency Management Agency official says Hurricane Gustav evacuees whose homes remain uninhabitable can have their hotel costs paid by FEMA. David Garratt, a deputy assistant administrator for the agency, said last night that the aid won't be available for short-term evacuees who fled the storm, spent a few nights in a hotel and then returned home. Rather FEMA's program pays for "extended stays" in hotels for people who can't return to their homes because of power outages, damage or for other reasons related to the storm.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 18, 2005
APPARENTLY, Brownie wasn't doing such a good job after all. You remember Brownie: Michael Brown, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and in that capacity, a focal point for mounting criticism of that agency's leisurely response to Hurricane Katrina. Brownie's qualifications for that job have since been revealed: He used to run horse shows and was a friend of a friend of the president. Last Friday, that president offered support for his beleaguered subordinate. "Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job," said George W. Bush.
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