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By Phil Jackman | October 15, 1991
At the start of Tommy Morrison's career, they pushed him as John Wayne's grand nephew and pinned the nickname "Duke" on him. Then he was this rugged dude who began competing in and winning tough-man contests in his mid-teens in some pretty rough locales (the Ozarks).The wins piled up, but so did the skepticism.His role in the movie "Rocky V" didn't help much. After all, how could some guy wearing pancake makeup and dancing around in fights choreographed by Sylvester Stallone ever be able to last in the ring with some of the top heavyweights in the world?
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Hasim Rahman has the whole scenario worked out in his mind."In another two years or so," said Rahman, an unbeaten Baltimore heavyweight, "most of today's top guys -- Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Ray Mercer and George Foreman -- will probably be retired from boxing."There will be a whole new group of young heavyweights at the top of the division, and I expect to be at the head of that class."Rahman, 24, took a small step in that direction July 15 when he stopped Jeff Wooden in the ninth round to win the vacant U.S. Boxing Association heavyweight title.
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Hasim Rahman has the whole scenario worked out in his mind."In another two years or so," said Rahman, an unbeaten Baltimore heavyweight, "most of today's top guys -- Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Ray Mercer and George Foreman -- will probably be retired from boxing."There will be a whole new group of young heavyweights at the top of the division, and I expect to be at the head of that class."Rahman, 24, took a small step in that direction July 15 when he stopped Jeff Wooden in the ninth round to win the vacant U.S. Boxing Association heavyweight title.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
NEW YORK -- How lucky can Lennox Lewis be?First, a New Jersey Superior Court judge ruled in March that the British heavyweight had to be next in line to challenge Mike Tyson for his newly won World Boxing Council title.And Friday night, the ring judges at Madison Square Garden awarded Lewis with a majority decision over 7-to-1 underdog Ray Mercer, a verdict that was lustily booed by the crowd of 17,041."I'm ready to fight Tyson any time. He hasn't fought anyone since his return. I fought and beat Ray Mercer, a true warrior," said Lewis, who enjoyed a brief reign as WBC king in 1993 after Riddick Bowe trashed the championship belt.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1996
NEW YORK -- Lennox Lewis has talked bravely of fighting and beating Mike Tyson if and when promoter Don King clears the way for a heavyweight championship showdown this year.But last night at Madison Square Garden, Lewis did little to make Tyson fearful while winning a controversial majority 10-round decision over Ray Mercer, a 7-1 underdog.Lewis looked like just the latest British title pretender in barely surviving this brutal encounter with Mercer, who never has been considered a heavyweight of the first order.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
NEW YORK -- How lucky can Lennox Lewis be?First, a New Jersey Superior Court judge ruled in March that the British heavyweight had to be next in line to challenge Mike Tyson for his newly won World Boxing Council title.And Friday night, the ring judges at Madison Square Garden awarded Lewis with a majority decision over 7-to-1 underdog Ray Mercer, a verdict that was lustily booed by the crowd of 17,041."I'm ready to fight Tyson any time. He hasn't fought anyone since his return. I fought and beat Ray Mercer, a true warrior," said Lewis, who enjoyed a brief reign as WBC king in 1993 after Riddick Bowe trashed the championship belt.
SPORTS
By Michael Katz and Michael Katz,New York Daily News | November 15, 1991
You never hear about the people with the slide rules and computers and buttoned-down minds who even now are hard at work on creating the NHL schedule for 1994-95.A will play B, C will play D, then everyone from A to W gets in the playoffs.Boxing is a bit more sophistica ted. The fans want Fighter A to confront Fighter B. He probably doesn't want to because he doesn't think he's good enough, but that's where the money is, so OK, but only if the pay-per-view does not conflict with a Madonna concert and the Las Vegas casinos aren't crowded with a convention of rubber duck salesmen.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 18, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Professional boxing always has thrived by matching men of different races and ethnic backgrounds. As former champion Muhammad Ali often said, "White plus black equals green for both fighters."That is why white boxers, such as Jerry Quarry in the 1970s and Gerry Cooney in the 1980s, were able to reap fortunes that far outweighed their boxing skills. In unsuccessful title bouts against Larry Holmes and Michael Spinks, Cooney earned $25 million.And now it is Tommy Morrison, 22, unbeaten (28-0, 24 knockouts)
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jesse Ferguson lasted 17 seconds into the second round of his fight against Riddick Bowe at RFK Stadium Saturday night only because they gave him about a minute and a half to gather himself up off the floor at the end of Round One.And this was the fellow, recall, who completely thrashed Ray Mercer, the man who was supposed to be in the opposite corner from the two-thirds heavyweight champion of the world.Now, suddenly, they're talking about Tommy Morrison being the next "worthy opponent" for Bowe, if the co-star of "Rocky V" posts a victory over ageless George Foreman in a couple of weeks.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | March 7, 1995
News from the Cauliflower Patch:To hear fight promoter Dan Duva tell it, boxing fans are in line to enter the state of Euphoria shortly. And it won't be a quick in-and-out, pick-up-some-souvenirs visit either."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1996
NEW YORK -- Lennox Lewis has talked bravely of fighting and beating Mike Tyson if and when promoter Don King clears the way for a heavyweight championship showdown this year.But last night at Madison Square Garden, Lewis did little to make Tyson fearful while winning a controversial majority 10-round decision over Ray Mercer, a 7-1 underdog.Lewis looked like just the latest British title pretender in barely surviving this brutal encounter with Mercer, who never has been considered a heavyweight of the first order.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | March 7, 1995
News from the Cauliflower Patch:To hear fight promoter Dan Duva tell it, boxing fans are in line to enter the state of Euphoria shortly. And it won't be a quick in-and-out, pick-up-some-souvenirs visit either."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jesse Ferguson lasted 17 seconds into the second round of his fight against Riddick Bowe at RFK Stadium Saturday night only because they gave him about a minute and a half to gather himself up off the floor at the end of Round One.And this was the fellow, recall, who completely thrashed Ray Mercer, the man who was supposed to be in the opposite corner from the two-thirds heavyweight champion of the world.Now, suddenly, they're talking about Tommy Morrison being the next "worthy opponent" for Bowe, if the co-star of "Rocky V" posts a victory over ageless George Foreman in a couple of weeks.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 6, 1992
Please, please, please, print media, let's cease and desist going along with Billy Packer's annual grab for publicity, which always arrives conveniently with the lull in the college hoops season. The CBS analyst putting the knock on the NCAA record 66 straight free throws made by Ginny Doyle of Richmond was just one of numerous obtuse remarks Packer has made over the years and should be kept in perspective (disregarded). Instead, TV cameras, reporters and folks turned out in droves to see Ginny outshoot Billy by an embarrassing margin.
SPORTS
By Michael Katz and Michael Katz,New York Daily News | November 15, 1991
You never hear about the people with the slide rules and computers and buttoned-down minds who even now are hard at work on creating the NHL schedule for 1994-95.A will play B, C will play D, then everyone from A to W gets in the playoffs.Boxing is a bit more sophistica ted. The fans want Fighter A to confront Fighter B. He probably doesn't want to because he doesn't think he's good enough, but that's where the money is, so OK, but only if the pay-per-view does not conflict with a Madonna concert and the Las Vegas casinos aren't crowded with a convention of rubber duck salesmen.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 18, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Professional boxing always has thrived by matching men of different races and ethnic backgrounds. As former champion Muhammad Ali often said, "White plus black equals green for both fighters."That is why white boxers, such as Jerry Quarry in the 1970s and Gerry Cooney in the 1980s, were able to reap fortunes that far outweighed their boxing skills. In unsuccessful title bouts against Larry Holmes and Michael Spinks, Cooney earned $25 million.And now it is Tommy Morrison, 22, unbeaten (28-0, 24 knockouts)
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 6, 1992
Please, please, please, print media, let's cease and desist going along with Billy Packer's annual grab for publicity, which always arrives conveniently with the lull in the college hoops season. The CBS analyst putting the knock on the NCAA record 66 straight free throws made by Ginny Doyle of Richmond was just one of numerous obtuse remarks Packer has made over the years and should be kept in perspective (disregarded). Instead, TV cameras, reporters and folks turned out in droves to see Ginny outshoot Billy by an embarrassing margin.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
Round One Promotions will stage its second dinner/boxing show since moving to Michael's 8th Avenue in Glen Burnie on Thursday, Feb. 6.Headlining the seven-bout card are heavyweights Jerry Jones (7-3) ofHillcrest Heights and Nathaniel Fitch (8-1) of Fort Bragg, N.C. in an eight-rounder. Jones once fought former World Boxing Organization champion Ray Mercer, and Fitch is a one-time Army champion.Also appearing is junior welterweight Mark Padeletti (3-1-1) of Baltimore, who has built a strong local following from training at theHarding/Lowry gymnasium in Pasadena.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 15, 1991
At the start of Tommy Morrison's career, they pushed him as John Wayne's grand nephew and pinned the nickname "Duke" on him. Then he was this rugged dude who began competing in and winning tough-man contests in his mid-teens in some pretty rough locales (the Ozarks).The wins piled up, but so did the skepticism.His role in the movie "Rocky V" didn't help much. After all, how could some guy wearing pancake makeup and dancing around in fights choreographed by Sylvester Stallone ever be able to last in the ring with some of the top heavyweights in the world?
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