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By Jeremy Caplan and Jeremy Caplan,NEWSDAY | April 18, 2004
When Ray Liotta first worked on Broadway, he wasn't anywhere near the stage. "I put the candy out, sold it before the show and during intermission, and then went home with $7 in my pocket," says the Hollywood veteran. "I used to do what that guy's doing," he says, motioning to a concession salesman in the Plymouth Theater, where, more than two decades after manning the M&Ms, Liotta is making his Broadway debut in Match. "It was a great job to have, because you got to watch people on stage, and you learned," says Liotta, 48. After growing up in New Jersey and graduating from the University of Miami in 1977, Liotta moved to New York to get started in acting.
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June 9, 2009
DVD Crossing Over * 1/2 (1 1/2 stars) Starring Harrison Ford, Ashley Judd, Ray Liotta. Directed by Wayne Kramer. Released by the Weinstein Co. $19.98. In what has become the preferred fall-back formula for message movies coming out of Hollywood these days, a group of disparate Los Angelenos, with vague connections to one another, grapple with U.S. immigration policy and its repercussions (think Crash, but focused on illegal immigrants). The result is a hodgepodge of ill-developed story lines that trip over one another in their attempt to tug at the audience's empathetic heartstrings.
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January 4, 2006
Saved from death row by a temper-tempering drug, a psycho (Ray Liotta, above) has gone off his meds in Control (9:15 p.m.-11 p.m., Showtime).
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | May 10, 2007
One can't help but question the wisdom of launching yet another serialized drama this year after the costly implosions of more than a dozen such tales, including Six Degrees (ABC), Kidnapped (NBC), Smith (CBS) and Vanished (Fox). Yet tonight, in the next-to-last week of the network season, ABC introduces Traveler, a thriller about three graduate school friends caught up in a terrorist bombing and manhunt in New York City. The network is even showcasing the series in the middle of May sweeps in the hour after Grey's Anatomy, one of the most popular shows on network TV. And this for a show that failed to make ABC's fall lineup.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
There's plenty of blood spilled, plenty of epithets shouted and a lot of cameras jittering all over the place in Narc, a movie obsessed with the incomprehensibly brutal double-life led by narcotics detectives often forced to work undercover alongside the very lowlifes they're supposed to be arresting. The result is most assuredly unsettling, which is doubtless the effect writer-director Joe Carnahan was going for. But it also comes across as self-indulgent, in ways he probably didn't intend, bearing all the earmarks of a director so obsessed with the way his story is being told that he neglects to pay enough attention to the story itself.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | April 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- If things had gone his way, John Gotti might have had an offer even he couldn't refuse.And it wouldn't be from the district attorney's office, either."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 5, 1993
UNLAWFUL ENTRYFox, 1992)The final downfall of this film is that perennial problem with so many thrillers and horror films: credibility. That is, too many times when you find yourself asking, "Why don't they change the security code" (which they finally do), and "Why don't they just move to another house?"It also has the obligatory explicit sex scene that you know is coming as soon as you see Madeleine Stowe's name in the titles. After all, when is the last time you saw an R-rated thriller that didn't have a healthy dose of nudity?
FEATURES
June 9, 2009
DVD Crossing Over * 1/2 (1 1/2 stars) Starring Harrison Ford, Ashley Judd, Ray Liotta. Directed by Wayne Kramer. Released by the Weinstein Co. $19.98. In what has become the preferred fall-back formula for message movies coming out of Hollywood these days, a group of disparate Los Angelenos, with vague connections to one another, grapple with U.S. immigration policy and its repercussions (think Crash, but focused on illegal immigrants). The result is a hodgepodge of ill-developed story lines that trip over one another in their attempt to tug at the audience's empathetic heartstrings.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Ten strangers find themselves trapped at an isolated hotel. Lethal nastiness ensues. Soon there are nine strangers, then eight, then seven, and so on. The plot of Identity has been around at least as long as Agatha Christie (Ten Little Indians), and when done well, it's easy to see why. There's tension, suspense, paranoia, colorful characters interacting with one another and plenty of chances for the audience to try and outguess the screenwriters ... and then be pleasantly surprised when they're proven wrong.
FEATURES
By LOU CEDRONE | September 21, 1990
MARTIN Scorsese's ''GoodFellas'' is a good film, maybe a great film, but it is also difficult to watch at times. At times, it is so brutal you will find yourself looking away. At other times, it is very funny, and you will wonder why you are laughing at a movie with this much brutality.The new film, which may be the best Scorsese has ever done, is based on ''Wiseguy,'' the book by Nicholas Pileggi, perhaps the nation's foremost authority on the Mafia.Pileggi's book was based on the experiences of a half-Irish, half-Sicilian mobster who just seemed to fall into it.The future mobster was born in a neighborhood where the gangster was the big guy and where everyone else treated him with respect.
FEATURES
January 4, 2006
Saved from death row by a temper-tempering drug, a psycho (Ray Liotta, above) has gone off his meds in Control (9:15 p.m.-11 p.m., Showtime).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeremy Caplan and Jeremy Caplan,NEWSDAY | April 18, 2004
When Ray Liotta first worked on Broadway, he wasn't anywhere near the stage. "I put the candy out, sold it before the show and during intermission, and then went home with $7 in my pocket," says the Hollywood veteran. "I used to do what that guy's doing," he says, motioning to a concession salesman in the Plymouth Theater, where, more than two decades after manning the M&Ms, Liotta is making his Broadway debut in Match. "It was a great job to have, because you got to watch people on stage, and you learned," says Liotta, 48. After growing up in New Jersey and graduating from the University of Miami in 1977, Liotta moved to New York to get started in acting.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Ten strangers find themselves trapped at an isolated hotel. Lethal nastiness ensues. Soon there are nine strangers, then eight, then seven, and so on. The plot of Identity has been around at least as long as Agatha Christie (Ten Little Indians), and when done well, it's easy to see why. There's tension, suspense, paranoia, colorful characters interacting with one another and plenty of chances for the audience to try and outguess the screenwriters ... and then be pleasantly surprised when they're proven wrong.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
There's plenty of blood spilled, plenty of epithets shouted and a lot of cameras jittering all over the place in Narc, a movie obsessed with the incomprehensibly brutal double-life led by narcotics detectives often forced to work undercover alongside the very lowlifes they're supposed to be arresting. The result is most assuredly unsettling, which is doubtless the effect writer-director Joe Carnahan was going for. But it also comes across as self-indulgent, in ways he probably didn't intend, bearing all the earmarks of a director so obsessed with the way his story is being told that he neglects to pay enough attention to the story itself.
FEATURES
By Mike Morris and Mike Morris,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2003
All Jason Patric wants to do is eat a crab cake sandwich, get lost in the crowded walkway surrounding Baltimore's Inner Harbor and stroll through the National Aquarium. "Do you think they have duckbill platypuses?" the actor asks, looking at the aquarium from his sixth-floor window in the Harbor Court Hotel. "I really like duckbill platypuses.'" He'd prefer to spend this brisk late-fall morning discussing unusual Australian mammals, but he can't. Against all sorts of odds, Patric is the star of a movie that is generating the kind of buzz many actors only dream of, and he feels obligated to promote it. Three years ago, it was unclear whether the movie would even get made.
FEATURES
By Robert Dominguez and Robert Dominguez,New York Daily News | February 1, 1994
They won't have Madeleine Stowe to kick around anymore.After too many roles as a trophy for testosterone-soaked men fighting for her favors, Ms. Stowe is finally getting to play a take-charge woman who drinks, smokes and cusses even worse than the hard-bitten Chicago cop she gets romantically involved with.In "Blink," which opened last week, Ms. Stowe is tough-talking Emma Brody, a blind musician who undergoes a corneal transplant early in the movie. Her restored vision suffers from a delayed reaction -- what she blurrily sees today doesn't register on her brain until much later -- so when Emma is the only person to see the face of a serial killer, the cops don't believe her.This is no frail, Audrey Hepburn-ish turn as a terrorized blind waif waiting until dark.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | May 10, 2007
One can't help but question the wisdom of launching yet another serialized drama this year after the costly implosions of more than a dozen such tales, including Six Degrees (ABC), Kidnapped (NBC), Smith (CBS) and Vanished (Fox). Yet tonight, in the next-to-last week of the network season, ABC introduces Traveler, a thriller about three graduate school friends caught up in a terrorist bombing and manhunt in New York City. The network is even showcasing the series in the middle of May sweeps in the hour after Grey's Anatomy, one of the most popular shows on network TV. And this for a show that failed to make ABC's fall lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | November 20, 1992
ARTICLE 99ORION)First of all, Article 99 is the name of a typically Catch-22 type of governmental provision that promises veterans full medical benefits but denies them treatment because their diagnosed condition cannot be specifically related to military service. Using that as a premise, the movie named after the provision is a sort of hybrid of the bureaucratic-bashing "Catch 22" and "MASH," with a bit of the cynicism of "The Hospital" thrown in.Dr. Leonard Sturgess (Ray Liotta) shares many characteristics of "MASH's" "Hawkeye" Pierce; a maverick surgeon who dresses sloppily, shows up late for meetings at which he makes snide comments, and whose compassion for patients is equaled only by his disdain for authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 5, 1993
UNLAWFUL ENTRYFox, 1992)The final downfall of this film is that perennial problem with so many thrillers and horror films: credibility. That is, too many times when you find yourself asking, "Why don't they change the security code" (which they finally do), and "Why don't they just move to another house?"It also has the obligatory explicit sex scene that you know is coming as soon as you see Madeleine Stowe's name in the titles. After all, when is the last time you saw an R-rated thriller that didn't have a healthy dose of nudity?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | November 20, 1992
ARTICLE 99ORION)First of all, Article 99 is the name of a typically Catch-22 type of governmental provision that promises veterans full medical benefits but denies them treatment because their diagnosed condition cannot be specifically related to military service. Using that as a premise, the movie named after the provision is a sort of hybrid of the bureaucratic-bashing "Catch 22" and "MASH," with a bit of the cynicism of "The Hospital" thrown in.Dr. Leonard Sturgess (Ray Liotta) shares many characteristics of "MASH's" "Hawkeye" Pierce; a maverick surgeon who dresses sloppily, shows up late for meetings at which he makes snide comments, and whose compassion for patients is equaled only by his disdain for authority.
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