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By Dan DeLuca and Dan DeLuca,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 14, 2005
Would you like a little Ray Charles with your mocha frappuccino? Perhaps a taste of Alanis Morissette to take the edge off that espresso? Or maybe a shot of Bob Dylan to go with a double tall soy no-foam latte? They're moving more than just macchiatos at Starbucks. Come Aug. 30, Dylan's Live at the Gaslight, a previously unreleased 1962 live recording, will be available exclusively at the java joints for 18 days. Morissette's Jagged Little Pill Acoustic has just ended a six-week Starbucks-only run during which it sold 170,000 copies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2005
Singles 1. "Candy Shop," 50 Cent 2. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams," Green Day 3. "Let Me Love You," Mario 4. "How We Do," The Game 5. "1, 2 Step," Ciara Billboard magazine Albums 1. Genius Loves Company, Ray Charles. Hear. (Platinum -- certified sales of 1 million units) 2. American Idiot, Green Day. Reprise. (Platinum) 3. The Documentary, The Game. Aftermath. 4. Grammy Nominees 2005, Various Artists. Grammy. 5. Confessions, Usher. LaFace. (Platinum) Billboard magazine Concert tours 1. Bette Midler 2. Cher 3. Yanni 4. Mannheim Steamroller 5. Trans-Siberian Orchestra Pollstar DVD sales 1. Shark Tale (widescreen)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -Million Dollar Baby, Clint Eastwood's film about a female boxer whose biggest challenges come outside the ring, scored a knockout last night at the 77th annual Academy Awards with four Oscar wins, including Best Picture. Released by Warner Bros. late in the year to take advantage of what the studio saw as a weak field, the film also earned awards for director Eastwood, actress Hilary Swank and supporting actor Morgan Freeman. With first-time host Chris Rock keeping things lively with pointed humor that stopped just short of being too risque for the network airwaves (censors beeped out his words at least twice)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 27, 2005
The 77th annual Academy Awards are about actors. Jamie Foxx's Ray Charles has aroused an outpouring of affection -- including host Chris Rock's proclamation that if Foxx doesn't win the comedian's going to steal a statue and give him one himself. Clint Eastwood has cemented his evolution from gun-toting enforcer to Grand Old Man by producing, directing and acting the boxing-ring sage in Million Dollar Baby. Johnny Depp has continued his march into the ranks of Hollywood legends with his performance in Finding Neverland.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | February 24, 2005
YOU HAVE an Oscar pool going at your place Sunday night? Then scribble in Million Dollar Baby as your mortal lock for best picture. Who cares that when it comes to acting, Clint Eastwood still has the emotional range of an ashtray? Or that co-star Morgan Freeman basically reprises the same role he's played a half-dozen times, that of the (pick one) wise, decent, gentle man who's also a wonderful (pick another one) partner, friend, mentor. The fact is, Hilary Swank is terrific as Maggie Fitzgerald, a poor hillbilly fighter with a heart bigger than the Ozarks, and the storytelling is first-rate.
FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 8, 2004
New faces of R&B and one of the genre's legends are among the leading nominees for top honors at the 47th annual Grammy Awards. Innovative rapper Kanye West leads the field with 10 nods, followed by R&B sex symbol Usher and the soulful Alicia Keys with eight each. The legendary Ray Charles has seven nominations for his posthumously released all-star duet album Genius Loves Company. Usher was expected to lead the nominations announced yesterday, so it was surprising to some industry insiders that West managed to slip by him. Usher's Confessions has sold more than 7 million copies, roughly three times as many as West's The College Dropout.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 29, 2004
Jamie Foxx is so mesmerizing as Ray Charles, so totally at ease inside the skin of perhaps America's greatest musical genius, at least of the last half of the 20th century, it's a shame his performance isn't surrounded by a better film. For outside of Foxx's performance, Ray is strictly by-the-numbers stuff, a highlight reel of Ray Charles' life that hits the highs and the lows, but offers little insight into the man, his talent or his place in music history. Director Taylor Hackford (An Officer and a Gentleman)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 27, 2004
His eyes shut tight, his head crooked to one side, Jamie Foxx slows down his voice, sweetens it up a tad, and slides effortlessly into a dead-on imitation of Ray Charles, complete with the blues-rock great's trademark stutter, exaggerated head roll and silkily seductive cadences. "Eh, eh, you know, I did this thing," he says, haltingly, with a sly grin, and suddenly there's another person in the room, a blind man who revolutionized American music, who was once called by no less an authority than Frank Sinatra: "the only genius in our business."
FEATURES
By Steve Morse and Steve Morse,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 2004
Critics who assume that artists make their best work when they are young just haven't been paying attention lately. Johnny Cash, Warren Zevon, and Joe Strummer made exceptional music in the last years of their lives, and joining that list is Ray Charles. His final album - in stores today - is a tantalizing collection of duets with old and young admirers, from B.B. King and Willie Nelson to Bonnie Raitt, Norah Jones and James Taylor. Charles' Genius Loves Company, completed before he died of complications from liver disease at age 73 on June 10, is a true musical event that confirms his status as the "Genius of Soul."
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 11, 2004
Ray Charles may have been one of the most influential singer-musicians ever to grace American pop music. He may have laid the foundation for soul - an earthy blend of the secular and the spiritual, and one of the country's greatest cultural achievements. But during a career of more than 50 years, the legendary Georgia native was affectionately known to friends, fans and industry insiders as Brother Ray, a man with a sharp sense of humor and fiercely independent spirit. Mr. Charles, whose classic hits include "Hit the Road Jack" and "What'd I Say," died yesterday of acute liver disease at his Beverly Hills home.
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