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By LAURA CHARLES | June 2, 1991
LEGENDARY POP SINGER Ray Charles will be the featured entertainer at the Associated Black Charities' charity gala, "Giving Gifts through Music," at the Meyerhoff on June 27.The benefit performance is the most ambitious fund-raising project in its six-year history and will give special recognition to civic leaders Alan Cooper, Tony Hawkins and J. Tyson Tildon for their contributions to the black community.C&P's Hank Butta is honorary chair with co-chairs Fredye Murphy of the Enterprise Foundation and Sina Reid of SMR Ltd. Tickets range from $25 to $500 and can be reserved by calling 669-7900.
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By Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
Ding, ding, ding . Last night was the start of the knockout rounds, the part of "The Voice" when the coaches cut their teams in half to determine who will represent them in the live shows. Each contestant will go head-to-head in a vocal duel with one other member of their team singing a song of their choice. If the coach likes them they get to stay. If not, they end their journey. But another coach can hit his or her big red button to get the contestant that was sent home in a steal.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 27, 2007
The April engagement of I Can't Stop Loving You -- The Music of Ray Charles has been canceled at the Lyric Opera House, according to the show's national marketing director, Bill Miller. The revue was to have been the fifth and final subscription offering in the 2006-2007 series booked by Performing Arts Productions. This cancellation means the entire subscription season has been scrubbed, a situation mirroring that at Washington's Warner Theatre, where the same company, under the name Baci Management, had booked a series.
NEWS
January 23, 2009
DAVID "FATHEAD" NEWMAN, 75 Saxophonist played with Ray Charles David "Fathead" Newman, a jazz musician who played with the Ray Charles Band and won fame as a tenor sax soloist, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer in a Kingston, N.Y., hospital, according to his wife, Karen Newman, who was also his manager. Mr. Newman played and recorded with a wide range of jazz and soul luminaries, such as Herbie Mann, Aretha Franklin and Aaron Neville. He also led a successful solo career. Mr. Newman was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1990 for his work with Art Blakey and Dr. John.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | May 10, 1991
RAY CHARLES figures that after 45 years in show business, he's a pretty good utility ballplayer who's no expert in any music field, but with variety, he keeps young at 58."I can play a little shortstop, I can pitch, I can play the outfield. That's the key to my longevity."So I'm not a jazz singer but a singer who can sing some jazz," Charles said by phone from Los Angeles. "And I'm not a rhythm and blues singer but I can sing some rhythm and blues. Same for country and western, rock 'n'roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 4, 1991
THE BIRTH OF SOULRay Charles (Atlantic 82310)Even though everybody knows that Ray Charles is one of the giants of American music, his utter ubiquity -- as cultural icon and Pepsi pitchman -- can make it easy to forget what a great soul singer he is. Fortunately, there's "The Birth of Soul" to remind us. This 53-song, three-disc (or three-cassette) box set bills itself as his "Complete Atlantic Rhythm & Blues Recordings, 1952-1959," but what it really documents isn't Charles' career in R&B but the process by which he created soul singing as we know it. Not only does the set show his roots in jump blues and gospel, but also how songs like "Don't You Know" and "I Wonder Who" presaged the sound of hits like "I Got a Woman."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
This weekend proved again Baltimoreans can find first-rate live music without leaving town.Yesterday, T. Herbert Dimmock III led a skilled chorus of 60 friends of Donald C. Arenth, many of them students of Frederick Petrich, and all voluntary singers uniting for a moving memorial tribute to Arenth in an AIDS benefit. Arenth, who died Jan. 30, sang locally.That Baltimore is packed with talent was clearly heard in the concert at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church, Park Avenue. The Arenth chorus sang Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus and a sterling Faure Requiem, with soloists Paul Redline, Timothy Kjer and Phyllis Burg and Brown's organist Eugene Belt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1993
MY WORLDRay Charles (Warner Bros. 26735)Everybody knows Ray Charles can sing. In fact, he can pull more out of a melody than almost any pop star alive. But even he can only do so much, a point that's driven home with unfortunate clarity on "My World." This isn't a bad album, mind; unlike the low-budget "Would You Believe?," Charles surrounded by top-flight players on almost every track, and the material takes him from bass-pumping funk ("Let Me Take Over") to straight up spirituals ("So Help Me God")
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 29, 1997
THE AMAZING Ray Charles was everything the Maryland School for the Blind hoped for and more. From the moment he sang "Georgia on My Mind" to the spectacular "What I Say" to end the show, he had all the folks at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on their feet begging for more.Charles was the star attraction at the school's fund-raiser concert, which raised more than $102,000. Among those in the audience were Mayor Kurt Schmoke and former O's pitcher Tippy Martinez. Mary Beth Marsden of WMAR-TV was the evening's emcee and local performer Deanna Bogart was the opening act.I'm told that the concert was the first in what will be an annual series to raise money for the school, a private, nonprofit institution that has served Maryland children for 144 years.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 27, 2004
His eyes shut tight, his head crooked to one side, Jamie Foxx slows down his voice, sweetens it up a tad, and slides effortlessly into a dead-on imitation of Ray Charles, complete with the blues-rock great's trademark stutter, exaggerated head roll and silkily seductive cadences. "Eh, eh, you know, I did this thing," he says, haltingly, with a sly grin, and suddenly there's another person in the room, a blind man who revolutionized American music, who was once called by no less an authority than Frank Sinatra: "the only genius in our business."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Kenny Rogers is having throat problems - not a good thing for a man renowned for his soft, leathery croon. "My body's falling apart, but I'm never sick," says the 70-year-old country-pop legend, his voice noticeably frayed. "I tell you: These throat problems started two days ago. I'm so full of steroids, I feel like a racehorse - or a professional athlete." Rogers is calling from his luxury tour bus en route to a vocal cords specialist in New York, the same one Mick Jagger goes to. "I'll be fine by the time I get to your city," he says reassuringly.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | November 5, 2007
Angela Jackson strides down Pennsylvania Avenue with pamphlets under her arm, unfazed by the line of dealers hawking drugs beneath blinking police cameras. "James Brown, James Brown!" cries one young man, applying the late soul star's name to his heroin capsules. "Ray Charles, Ray Charles!" cries another. Places like this are utterly familiar to Jackson, who once supported a heroin addiction by selling sex to men eager to step into an alley or vacant building. Today, she spots someone who's trolling for customers as she once did. "Hey, miss, you have a minute?"
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 28, 2007
The concept is not so strange anymore. The same place where you can buy a cup of coffee, a pair of jeans or even undergarments is also where you can find the latest sounds by your favorite artists. It's music shopping made easy for those who have neither the time nor the interest to haunt out-of-the-way record shops or big boxes like Best Buy for new tunes. In recent years, several traditionally non-music companies - Gap, Victoria's Secret and Starbucks chief among them - have thrived in lifestyle music marketing.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 19, 2007
Long before American Idol, Taylor Hicks had tried to be a star, doggedly working the Southern bar circuit and releasing two independent albums that only a handful of people heard. But it took a win last year on the insanely popular talent show to give his flagging singing career a huge boost. His victory on the fifth season of Idol has earned the prematurely gray Alabama native a major-label contract and a devout following, famously dubbed the "Soul Patrol." But on his national tour, which stopped Tuesday night at Rams Head Live!
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 27, 2007
"I'm an Oscar winner but I'm still ghetto," Jamie Foxx told the full house at 1st Mariner Arena on Sunday night. And for nearly three hours, the comedian-actor-singer, who won an Academy Award for his stellar portrayal of Ray Charles in 2004's Ray, mixed explicit comedy with, well, explicit balladry. It was all forced and certainly disjointed as the Texas native tried to segue from slightly juvenile comedy routines about sex to serious crooning about - you guessed it - sex. But here's the problem: Foxx is more engaging as a manic, somewhat-silly comedian than an R. Kelly-style urban crooner.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 27, 2007
The April engagement of I Can't Stop Loving You -- The Music of Ray Charles has been canceled at the Lyric Opera House, according to the show's national marketing director, Bill Miller. The revue was to have been the fifth and final subscription offering in the 2006-2007 series booked by Performing Arts Productions. This cancellation means the entire subscription season has been scrubbed, a situation mirroring that at Washington's Warner Theatre, where the same company, under the name Baci Management, had booked a series.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 11, 2004
Ray Charles may have been one of the most influential singer-musicians ever to grace American pop music. He may have laid the foundation for soul - an earthy blend of the secular and the spiritual, and one of the country's greatest cultural achievements. But during a career of more than 50 years, the legendary Georgia native was affectionately known to friends, fans and industry insiders as Brother Ray, a man with a sharp sense of humor and fiercely independent spirit. Mr. Charles, whose classic hits include "Hit the Road Jack" and "What'd I Say," died yesterday of acute liver disease at his Beverly Hills home.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
Had Michael Ray Charles and Sambo been complete strangers, perhaps nothing would have come of their meeting more than 10 years ago. As it was, Sambo's face on a plastic figurine Charles had been given was just familiar and peculiar enough to get him thinking. And reading. And painting. There was something about that black face with its outlandish lips and big, rolling eyes frozen in perpetual astonishment. Charles says he's not quite been able to shake it, not even after painting it so many times: Sambo as cartoonish, white-gloved NBA star, dribbling hard down court, trailing a price tag of green dollar signs.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 9, 2006
A theater subscription series will return to the Lyric Opera House for the first time in three seasons in 2006-2007. The five-show season will range from a dance-musical adaptation of Casablanca to a revival of On Golden Pond starring Richard Chamberlain and Hayley Mills. "We're thrilled to be back at the Lyric presenting another season of Broadway attractions," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts Productions, which offered a series at the Lyric for almost a decade, until fall 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | September 29, 2005
In this week's playlist, we go back in time, reviewing newly reissued music by the Genius of Soul, a pioneering hip-hop trio and one of the most successful pop-rock groups to come out of England. Ray Charles, Pure Genius: The Complete Atlantic Recordings (1952-1959): Rhino Records has a long, award-winning reputation for its box sets. And this recent release on Brother Ray is another cleverly designed package. You get seven CDs plus a DVD of his performance at the 1960 Newport Jazz Festival, all housed in a camel-colored replica of an old-school, all-in-one record player.
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