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By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
Let's All Kill Constance: A Novel, by Ray Bradbury. HarperCollins. 224 pages. $23.95. Let's All Kill Constance calls itself "a novel." It opens as Hollywood noir, at its center a boozy screenwriter at his beach house on a "dark and stormy night." Ray Bradbury the science fiction writer appears to be sending up the detective genre of Hammett and Chandler, and the notion of genre in general. Bradbury's 80th some odd book is in fact neither of these things. It's a memoir disguised as a parody of genre, in which the author explores what he has achieved and how he might face with equanimity the end of both his writing and his actual life.
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By Brian Griffiths | December 16, 2013
Christmas is nine days away, and if you're looking for presents, well, you still have time. When it comes to becoming educated on conservatism and Maryland, books are a very effective way to show somebody that you care enough about them and our state and country to arm them with the necessary knowledge and motivation to get involved in the community. So here are some books that I would recommend as great stocking stuffers:   The Conscience of a Conservative by Barry Goldwater : The gold standard of conservative philosophy and thought, Senator Goldwater's book stands up more than 50 years after it was published.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
From The Dust Returned, by Ray Bradbury. William Morrow. 204 pages. $23. Ray Bradbury, our most beloved science fiction writer, writes in the "afterword" to his 30th book that his stories have been "tales of men who discovered the skeleton inside themselves and were terrified of that skeleton." Even on Mars, you cannot escape yourself. No matter the galaxies you traverse, you are always here. As practiced by Bradbury, by Philip K. Dick, by Issac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein, by Ursula Le Guin and all the masters, classic science fiction is utopian, indignant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
A love of books goes a lot farther than reading for 32-year-old Caitlin Phillips. Her first job was working at a used bookstore, where she saw how many books were damaged and relegated to the trash. In 2004, Phillips created Rebound Designs, rescuing old and unwanted books and turning them into one-of-a-kind accessories such as purses and electronics cases. Originally from Gaithersburg, she now calls the Artists Lofts in Mount Rainier her home. You can see her work in person at the Downtown Holiday Market Washington this week or when she comes to Baltimore for the American Craft Council show at the Baltimore Convention Center in late February.
NEWS
By Digby Diehl | September 9, 2007
Now and Forever By Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 I have had the pleasure of listening to Ray Bradbury for more than 40 years - in speeches, interviews and late-night conversations over a glass of wine. His energy and exuberance rarely falter, and listeners almost always go away inspired. That first afternoon in 1964 in his Wilshire Boulevard office, we sat on the floor and played with some of the same "toys" he still plays with today in the basement of his home: miniature dinosaurs and spaceships, Bullwinkle Moose and comic books of every description.
NEWS
By JOHN GEIRLAND | December 6, 1998
LONG before NASA's robotic Pathfinder rumbled across the rocky soil of Mars, Ray Bradbury owned the Red Planet in the popular imagination, courtesy of "The Martian Chronicles" (1950).His 600-plus short stories have laid claim to other worlds. "The Veldt" (1950) inspired a generation of smart-home and virtual-reality pioneers. "A Sound of Thunder" (1952) illustrated chaos theory's butterfly effect years before the theory existed.The fireman Montag's dash for freedom, televised by pursuing helicopters in "Fahrenheit 451" (1953)
FEATURES
August 25, 2003
American wins Fringe Festival's comedy award American Demetri Martin yesterday won the 23rd Perrier Comedy award, one of Britain's most prestigious comedy performance awards. Martin, 30, who dropped out of law school to pursue comedy, took the prize for the best comedy of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival with his routine about his obsessive youth, "If I." The New Yorker beat Australian favorite Adam Hills, fellow American Reginald D. Hunter, New Zealand duo Flight of the Conchords, and Briton Howard Read.
NEWS
By Lucinda Michele Knapp and Lucinda Michele Knapp,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
Farewell Summer Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 "Is death being on a ship sailing and all your folks left back on the shore?" asks 13-year-old Doug of his grandfather in Ray Bradbury's latest, Farewell Summer. "That's about it, Doug," replies the grandfather - and in Doug's head "the storm began." It's the storm of adolescence, the turmoil of loss, and it hangs low over Farewell Summer, Bradbury's long-delayed follow-up to his 1957 semi-autobiographical Dandelion Wine, which featured a 12-year-old Douglas Spaulding in a handful of short stories that read like miniatures of intricate clockwork, each perfectly machined and chiming with the cogs and gears of idiosyncratic characters, building into a contraption that was as much a time machine as the mysterious creation that lived in the garage of a town denizen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
A love of books goes a lot farther than reading for 32-year-old Caitlin Phillips. Her first job was working at a used bookstore, where she saw how many books were damaged and relegated to the trash. In 2004, Phillips created Rebound Designs, rescuing old and unwanted books and turning them into one-of-a-kind accessories such as purses and electronics cases. Originally from Gaithersburg, she now calls the Artists Lofts in Mount Rainier her home. You can see her work in person at the Downtown Holiday Market Washington this week or when she comes to Baltimore for the American Craft Council show at the Baltimore Convention Center in late February.
NEWS
By Thomas N. Longstreth | September 27, 1994
AS SCHOOLS resume in many communities this fall, book committees are reviewing textbook lists, looking for titles to eliminate, not because of a perceived lack of literary merit, but rather for other reasons.Unfortunately, many literary gems are placed on such lists in a move to not offend or not air different views.Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451" ("The temperature at which books burn.") published in 1953, is one that has appeared on such lists. It's one of a handful of American novels in the tradition of the "negative utopia" made famous by Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and George Orwell's "1984."
NEWS
By Digby Diehl | September 9, 2007
Now and Forever By Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 I have had the pleasure of listening to Ray Bradbury for more than 40 years - in speeches, interviews and late-night conversations over a glass of wine. His energy and exuberance rarely falter, and listeners almost always go away inspired. That first afternoon in 1964 in his Wilshire Boulevard office, we sat on the floor and played with some of the same "toys" he still plays with today in the basement of his home: miniature dinosaurs and spaceships, Bullwinkle Moose and comic books of every description.
NEWS
By Lucinda Michele Knapp and Lucinda Michele Knapp,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
Farewell Summer Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 "Is death being on a ship sailing and all your folks left back on the shore?" asks 13-year-old Doug of his grandfather in Ray Bradbury's latest, Farewell Summer. "That's about it, Doug," replies the grandfather - and in Doug's head "the storm began." It's the storm of adolescence, the turmoil of loss, and it hangs low over Farewell Summer, Bradbury's long-delayed follow-up to his 1957 semi-autobiographical Dandelion Wine, which featured a 12-year-old Douglas Spaulding in a handful of short stories that read like miniatures of intricate clockwork, each perfectly machined and chiming with the cogs and gears of idiosyncratic characters, building into a contraption that was as much a time machine as the mysterious creation that lived in the garage of a town denizen.
FEATURES
August 25, 2003
American wins Fringe Festival's comedy award American Demetri Martin yesterday won the 23rd Perrier Comedy award, one of Britain's most prestigious comedy performance awards. Martin, 30, who dropped out of law school to pursue comedy, took the prize for the best comedy of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival with his routine about his obsessive youth, "If I." The New Yorker beat Australian favorite Adam Hills, fellow American Reginald D. Hunter, New Zealand duo Flight of the Conchords, and Briton Howard Read.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
Let's All Kill Constance: A Novel, by Ray Bradbury. HarperCollins. 224 pages. $23.95. Let's All Kill Constance calls itself "a novel." It opens as Hollywood noir, at its center a boozy screenwriter at his beach house on a "dark and stormy night." Ray Bradbury the science fiction writer appears to be sending up the detective genre of Hammett and Chandler, and the notion of genre in general. Bradbury's 80th some odd book is in fact neither of these things. It's a memoir disguised as a parody of genre, in which the author explores what he has achieved and how he might face with equanimity the end of both his writing and his actual life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
From The Dust Returned, by Ray Bradbury. William Morrow. 204 pages. $23. Ray Bradbury, our most beloved science fiction writer, writes in the "afterword" to his 30th book that his stories have been "tales of men who discovered the skeleton inside themselves and were terrified of that skeleton." Even on Mars, you cannot escape yourself. No matter the galaxies you traverse, you are always here. As practiced by Bradbury, by Philip K. Dick, by Issac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein, by Ursula Le Guin and all the masters, classic science fiction is utopian, indignant.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
My dad died 14 years ago, and there isn't a day goes by I don't wish there was some way I could talk to him. In "Frequency," an enjoyably complex sci-fi suspense thriller from director Gregory Hoblit ("Primal Fear"), New York police officer John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is given just that opportunity. Thanks to some huge sunspots, an overactive aurora borealis and what must be the most powerful vacuum tubes ever manufactured, Sullivan is able to reach back three decades and maybe a parallel universe or two and talk via ham radio with his firefighter dad, Frank (Dennis Quaid)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
My dad died 14 years ago, and there isn't a day goes by I don't wish there was some way I could talk to him. In "Frequency," an enjoyably complex sci-fi suspense thriller from director Gregory Hoblit ("Primal Fear"), New York police officer John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is given just that opportunity. Thanks to some huge sunspots, an overactive aurora borealis and what must be the most powerful vacuum tubes ever manufactured, Sullivan is able to reach back three decades and maybe a parallel universe or two and talk via ham radio with his firefighter dad, Frank (Dennis Quaid)
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | December 16, 2013
Christmas is nine days away, and if you're looking for presents, well, you still have time. When it comes to becoming educated on conservatism and Maryland, books are a very effective way to show somebody that you care enough about them and our state and country to arm them with the necessary knowledge and motivation to get involved in the community. So here are some books that I would recommend as great stocking stuffers:   The Conscience of a Conservative by Barry Goldwater : The gold standard of conservative philosophy and thought, Senator Goldwater's book stands up more than 50 years after it was published.
NEWS
By JOHN GEIRLAND | December 6, 1998
LONG before NASA's robotic Pathfinder rumbled across the rocky soil of Mars, Ray Bradbury owned the Red Planet in the popular imagination, courtesy of "The Martian Chronicles" (1950).His 600-plus short stories have laid claim to other worlds. "The Veldt" (1950) inspired a generation of smart-home and virtual-reality pioneers. "A Sound of Thunder" (1952) illustrated chaos theory's butterfly effect years before the theory existed.The fireman Montag's dash for freedom, televised by pursuing helicopters in "Fahrenheit 451" (1953)
NEWS
By Thomas N. Longstreth | September 27, 1994
AS SCHOOLS resume in many communities this fall, book committees are reviewing textbook lists, looking for titles to eliminate, not because of a perceived lack of literary merit, but rather for other reasons.Unfortunately, many literary gems are placed on such lists in a move to not offend or not air different views.Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451" ("The temperature at which books burn.") published in 1953, is one that has appeared on such lists. It's one of a handful of American novels in the tradition of the "negative utopia" made famous by Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and George Orwell's "1984."
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