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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
While water shortages loom in South Carroll, county officials wonder: Should we build a new plant at the county's own reservoir or expand an existing plant at Liberty Reservoir, owned by Baltimore City? In a closed session yesterday with engineering consultants, the commissioners reviewed the history of the water problems in Carroll's most populous area and their options. From Black & Veach, a Gaithersburg engineering company, they learned that the difference between building a new treatment plant at Piney Run Reservoir, a county-owned lake in Sykesville, and expanding the aging Freedom Water Treatment Plant at Liberty is less than $2 million.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved an agreement yesterday that will allow Carroll County to move forward with a $14 million expansion of the Freedom Water Treatment Plant in South Carroll. The agreement was among several documents that the five-member board, which includes Mayor Martin O'Malley, approved without discussion The city will lease Carroll County an additional 1.62 acres, for a total of 3.63 acres, off Oakland Road adjoining the 45 billion-gallon Liberty Reservoir, which supplies drinking water to more than 2 million people in the metropolitan area.
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | September 18, 2011
During a break in the action, my son's friend came into the kitchen, glass in hand, seeking some water to drink. He looked at the refrigerator door - but saw no dispenser there. He turned toward a corner where a water cooler might be, but saw no dispenser there. A bit confused, he scanned the room, glass still in hand, looking for something, anything, that resembled a spigot from which drinking water might flow. Finally, defeated, he asked me where, please, he might find some water.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Traces of gasoline contamination have been found in the water wells at four additional Harford County gasoline stations, the county's health officer told the County Council last night. The report by Dr. Andrew Bernstein brings to seven the number of gasoline stations identified in Harford as sites of possible contamination by methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE as it is commonly called. The four stations include a Royal Farms store on Route 22 in Churchville that Bernstein said voluntarily stopped serving food, coffee and sodas from its fountains yesterday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1996
Unhappy mountain bikers turned out last night to defend their sport and protest a proposal to prohibit them from using the trails surrounding Baltimore's reservoirs.At a public hearing, they argued that city water officials are unwilling to work with them on finding ways to protect the watersheds from damage, short of imposing an outright ban."The problem is their mindset is not recreation, it's safe water," said Joe Surkiewicz, a free-lance writer and one of the organizers of the Maryland Association of Mountain Bike Operators, also known as MAMBO.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Harford County christened its new $22 million Abingdon Water Treatment Plant Thursday as county officials called it one of their proudest accomplishments of the decade."
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | September 18, 2011
During a break in the action, my son's friend came into the kitchen, glass in hand, seeking some water to drink. He looked at the refrigerator door - but saw no dispenser there. He turned toward a corner where a water cooler might be, but saw no dispenser there. A bit confused, he scanned the room, glass still in hand, looking for something, anything, that resembled a spigot from which drinking water might flow. Finally, defeated, he asked me where, please, he might find some water.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
NEWS
July 21, 1991
Mayor W. Benjamin Brown again pleaded with city residents Friday to conserve water because of the drought.Residents seem to have not heeded the City Council's request two weeks ago to stop water usage outside, Brown said."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved an agreement yesterday that will allow Carroll County to move forward with a $14 million expansion of the Freedom Water Treatment Plant in South Carroll. The agreement was among several documents that the five-member board, which includes Mayor Martin O'Malley, approved without discussion The city will lease Carroll County an additional 1.62 acres, for a total of 3.63 acres, off Oakland Road adjoining the 45 billion-gallon Liberty Reservoir, which supplies drinking water to more than 2 million people in the metropolitan area.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Traces of gasoline contamination have been found in the water wells at four additional Harford County gasoline stations, the county's health officer told the County Council last night. The report by Dr. Andrew Bernstein brings to seven the number of gasoline stations identified in Harford as sites of possible contamination by methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE as it is commonly called. The four stations include a Royal Farms store on Route 22 in Churchville that Bernstein said voluntarily stopped serving food, coffee and sodas from its fountains yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
While water shortages loom in South Carroll, county officials wonder: Should we build a new plant at the county's own reservoir or expand an existing plant at Liberty Reservoir, owned by Baltimore City? In a closed session yesterday with engineering consultants, the commissioners reviewed the history of the water problems in Carroll's most populous area and their options. From Black & Veach, a Gaithersburg engineering company, they learned that the difference between building a new treatment plant at Piney Run Reservoir, a county-owned lake in Sykesville, and expanding the aging Freedom Water Treatment Plant at Liberty is less than $2 million.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1996
Unhappy mountain bikers turned out last night to defend their sport and protest a proposal to prohibit them from using the trails surrounding Baltimore's reservoirs.At a public hearing, they argued that city water officials are unwilling to work with them on finding ways to protect the watersheds from damage, short of imposing an outright ban."The problem is their mindset is not recreation, it's safe water," said Joe Surkiewicz, a free-lance writer and one of the organizers of the Maryland Association of Mountain Bike Operators, also known as MAMBO.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Harford County christened its new $22 million Abingdon Water Treatment Plant Thursday as county officials called it one of their proudest accomplishments of the decade."
NEWS
December 16, 1990
Residential customers of the Maryland American Water Co., which serves the greater Bel Air area, could see their monthly water bills increase by $2.33 if the Maryland Public Service Commission approves the utility's request for a two-step rate increase.Donald Whitten, manager of Maryland American, said the company asked for the two-step increase Dec. 7. It is the third time in two years Maryland American has sought an increase.Whitten said that if approved, the first rate increase, of $1.25 a month for the average residential customer, would take effect beginning in the summer of 1991.
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