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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Millions of gallons of raw sewage were overflowing into the Little Patuxent River in Howard County late Monday and early Tuesday morning after two separate electrical feeds were cut off at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant, according to county officials. Officials were not sure when the overflow would be stopped. The plant, about a half-mile east of the intersection of Route 1 and Route 32 at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage, serves the central part of Howard County. Power was knocked out to the first 32,000-volt electrical feeder amid high winds and rain in the region because of superstorm Sandy about 8:30 or 9 p.m., and to the second at 11 p.m., said Stephen Gerwin, the county's utilities bureau chief.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
I can't recall the last time that a commercial real estate development site spilled more than 3 million gallons of raw sewage into the Maryland waterways but that's what the state of Maryland did last week ( "3 million-gallon sewage spill reported at Wagner's Point," Aug. 15). Maryland has instituted overwhelming changes over the last few years on commercial real estate development concerning storm water runoff on all development sites throughout the state. These changes were made to control the amount of rain water that leaves commercial sites.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
A sewer main broke in Severn yesterday, spilling about 5,000 gallons of raw sewage onto the ground near Severn Run Natural Environment Area. The break was discovered about 9:30 a.m. by a plant operator at the Severn Run pumping station, at Burns Crossing and Old Mill roads on the edge of the environmental area that contains Severn Run. The spill was not major, but sewage might have seeped into the stream, said John Morris, a county spokesman. Effects of the spill should be minimal, said Richard McIntire, spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
Saturday's Sun reported yet another episode of bay pollution by its most flagrant violator, the state of Maryland ( "Baltimore City reports massive sewage spills," Aug. 15). This time 3 million gallons of raw sewage reportedly were spilled overboard and ultimately into the bay. If The Sun would search its archives and provide the public a tally of all such spills over the last 10 years the real culprit of our bay's pollution would be exposed. Farmers' fertilizer leeching into the ground to enhance crop production and my commercial property, which garnered the state $6,000 in rain tax, most certainly contribute nothing detrimental to the bay compared to the state's record.
NEWS
February 24, 2007
An Arnold waterway has been reopened after a 17,500-gallon wastewater spill last week, the Anne Arundel County Department of Health said yesterday. Test results show Deep Creek's water is acceptable for direct contact and recreational use, according to state and federal standards. The ice storm on Valentine's Day knocked out power to much of Anne Arundel County, including the Bay Hills Pumping Station. It overflowed, sending the raw sewage into the creek.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Operators of Hagerstown's disabled wastewater treatment plant are expected to begin using chlorine today to disinfect the raw sewage that has been flowing into a Potomac River tributary since chemicals from an unknown source knocked out the plant on Friday. The plant has been spilling 5.7 million gallons of raw sewage a day into Antietam Creek since one or more toxic chemicals killed the microbes that remove harmful germs in sewage. Officials could not say how long it would be before the plant is operating normally.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | August 5, 1991
The general manager of Halle's Marina and Campground in Calvert County has been charged with violating the federal Clean Water Act by dumping raw sewage into Chesapeake Bay.FBI agents arrested the defendant, Michael T. Strandquist, 34, of Annapolis, last Friday after they allegedly saw a marina employee dumping raw sewage into a culvert at the campground when they went to the Chesapeake Beach marina to serve a search-and-seizure warrant for company records.The...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 3, 2003
Heavy rain over the holiday weekend caused three storm water overflows in Howard County on Memorial Day, public works officials said. About 15,500 gallons of storm-water overflow contaminated with raw sewage entered the Patuxent River at the North Laurel sewage pump station on U.S. 1 on May 26, said Bob Beringer, chief of the Department of Public Works' Bureau of Utilities. The overflow was reported at 6:30 a.m. and ceased about 1:30 p.m., he said. The station continued to experience heavy flows for hours after the river level receded, however.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
About 50 million gallons of raw sewage have spilled into the Gwynns Falls in West Baltimore as a result of a blocked sewer pipe that may not be fixed until tomorrow, city officials said yesterday. "We don't have the equipment to get to the pipe," said George Winfield, director of Baltimore's Department of Public Works. He said that a contractor with machinery capable of digging more than 30 feet to reach the pipe won't arrive until tomorrow. About 8.5 million gallons of sewage are flowing into the stream a day, Winfield said.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
A Cambridge country club was ordered to pay an "extraordinary penalty" of $500,000 by a Dorchester County Circuit Court for discharging raw sewage into wetlands along the Choptank River that eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay, according to a Thursday announcement from the state attorney general's office. BSJ Partners LLC, owner-operator of Clearview at Horn's Point, formerly known as the Cambridge Country Club, was ordered to pay a $485,000 civil penalty for environmental violations, a $15,000 penalty for failing to submit discharge monitoring reports for three years; and a $500 penalty for discovery violations.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Eight hundred thousand gallons of raw sewage poured into Gunpowder Falls Sunday night after a pumping station in the Perry Hall area unexpectedly lost power, Baltimore County reported Monday. A Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crew doing planned maintenance work inadvertently cut power to the sewage pumping station at the end of Dundawan Road about 11:40 p.m., according to David Fidler, spokesman for the county's Department of Public Works. Sewage overflowed from the station into the river nearby for a little more than two hours until BGE crews restored power, Fidler said in an email.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 30, 2013
A federal judge has denied - for now, at least - Blue Water Baltimor e's bid to intervene in the city's effort to delay its court-decreed deadline for fixing the pervasive sewage leaks that foul local streams and Baltimore's harbor. In a brief five-sentence ruling filed earlier this month, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz declared "untimely" the environmental group's motion to participate in talks between city officials and federal and state regulators over the 2002 consent decree requiring Baltimore to fix its largest sewage overflows.  The city  has estimated it would spend $1 billion upgrading the sewer system by the deadline, 2016.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 28, 2013
Workers stopped a leak in an old sewage main in southwest Baltimore Saturday, more than 18 hours after a rupture in the eight-inch pipe caused raw sewage to spew into the Gwynns Falls at a rate of 50 gallons per minute, according to the city's Department of Public Works. The break in the terra cotta main, in a wooded section of Leakin and Gwynns Falls park, was identified at noon on Friday, but crews did not begin working on the problem until daylight Saturday. The leak was difficult to reach because of large, downed trees, a department spokesman said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Millions of gallons of raw sewage were overflowing into the Little Patuxent River in Howard County late Monday and early Tuesday morning after two separate electrical feeds were cut off at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant, according to county officials. Officials were not sure when the overflow would be stopped. The plant, about a half-mile east of the intersection of Route 1 and Route 32 at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage, serves the central part of Howard County. Power was knocked out to the first 32,000-volt electrical feeder amid high winds and rain in the region because of superstorm Sandy about 8:30 or 9 p.m., and to the second at 11 p.m., said Stephen Gerwin, the county's utilities bureau chief.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Heavy rains routinely trigger big sewage overflows in Baltimore, but there is growing evidence that chronic leaks from the region's aging, cracked sewer lines are a bigger threat to public health. Though storm-fed spills can be dramatic, Baltimore's' streams and harbor are also fouled on sunny days as storm drains yield grayish discharges that look and smell like sewage. That is what they are. Even the nearly $2 billion overhaul under way on the 3,100 miles of sewer lines in the city and Baltimore County won't be enough to make those waters safe, experts and activists say. Leaks allow raw sewage to seep into storm drain pipes, which funnel rain from streets, parking lots and buildings into nearby waterways.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Baltimore County utility crews dealt with yet another sewage spill at the Patapsco Sewage Pumping Station in Baltimore Highlands. About 525,000 gallons of sewage spilled from a 54-inch concrete pipe Saturday into the lower Patapsco River. The county spent $500,000 to replace aging pipes earlier this month after a main conduit ruptured in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and poured about 100 million gallons of raw sewage into the river over the course of a week. Crews discovered a joint failure in the new piping last week and the overflow occurred during the ensuing repair for a few hours early Saturday morning.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Residents in the Severna Park neighborhood of Ben Oaks gave their stamp of approval last night to an alternative plan presented by the county that would not require more than a million gallons of raw sewage to pass through a tiny pumping station a stone's throw from the Severn River. "Thank you for taking us seriously, because there was a lot of concern generated about the Severn River," Ben Oaks Civic Association President Catherine Thomas told county public works engineers who presented the plan last night at the county's Central Water Facility in Millersville.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
CUMBERLAND - As the late-afternoon sun sinks toward the mountains, 16-year-old Brent Sorrells pauses on his trek home through downtown to show off his catch for the day. It is a jar full of minnows, to be used as bait for hooking bigger fry. Just a stone's throw from where the lanky youth netted his fish, milky green water with a septic smell oozes from a concrete tunnel into the North Branch of the Potomac River. Whenever a hard rain falls - and this year has brought dozens of downpours - the tunnel spews a torrent of water contaminated with raw sewage into the river.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
Hurricane Irene did more than topple trees and turn out the lights across the Baltimore area. The storm left behind some nasty, stinky reminders of its fury, as sewage spills forced beach closures and triggered warnings to stay away from the water as summer draws to a close. The worst problem came in the Baltimore Highlands area southwest of the city, where a ruptured sewer main has poured about 100 million gallons of raw sewage into the lower Patapsco River over the past week. Power outages also led to more than a dozen other sewage spills across the region.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
Reporter Gives Update Covered In Sea Foam: MyFoxNY.com   Hurricane Irene was something of a near-miss for Ocean City. Yes the town got hit with some high winds and lots of rain, but for the most part it didn't get the pummeling officials expected. This local news reporter from Washington didn't quite get what he expected either. Several websites have posted about WTTG-TV'sTucker Barnes who reoorted on the storm from Ocean City over the weekend, covered in some foamy substance that he described as being "organic.
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