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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Six people were infected with Campylobacter by raw milk from the Family Cow dairy store in Chambersburg, Pa., including three in Maryland, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday. The bacteria causes diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and can progress into a more serious bloodstream infection, usually two to five days after exposure. The state agency and the health department in Pennsylvania are advising consumers to discard any product bought from this farm since Jan. 1. The implicated milk comes in plastic gallon, half gallon and pint containers and is sold directly to consumers on the farm and at drop off points and retail stores in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Tom Hucker and Jennie Forehand | August 26, 2013
When Democratic Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota, ranking member of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, helped Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa craft an amendment to the Farm Bill that would nullify dozens - if not hundreds - of state laws, this was his explanation, clear and simple: "I'm tired of these states doing this crap. " And apparently a narrow majority of the House of Representatives agrees, since this amendment was included in the pared-down version of the Farm Bill that passed the House, 216-208.
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NEWS
May 8, 2007
Foodies across the nation prize Chesapeake Bay soft crabs. Our locally produced wines enjoy a growing reputation, too. There's stuffed ham in Southern Maryland and beaten biscuits from the Eastern Shore. But when it comes to cheese, Maryland regulations don't allow the kind of gourmet fare that's produced in other states. Fortunately, that's about to change. Legislation approved by the General Assembly this year and expected to be signed into law today by Gov. Martin O'Malley will for the first time legalize a limited production of raw milk cheese in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The four black orbs — dark-tinted security cameras — watch silently overhead in a room filled with stainless-steel pipes. The pipes carry raw milk from four large holding tanks outside the building into two large metal cabinets that look like oversized car radiators. This is one of the critical points in Cloverland Dairy's production process, where raw milk is pasteurized — heated well above 161 degrees Fahrenheit — and then pumped through pipes into other parts of the Baltimore plant for processing and packaging.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The four black orbs — dark-tinted security cameras — watch silently overhead in a room filled with stainless-steel pipes. The pipes carry raw milk from four large holding tanks outside the building into two large metal cabinets that look like oversized car radiators. This is one of the critical points in Cloverland Dairy's production process, where raw milk is pasteurized — heated well above 161 degrees Fahrenheit — and then pumped through pipes into other parts of the Baltimore plant for processing and packaging.
NEWS
By Tom Hucker and Jennie Forehand | August 26, 2013
When Democratic Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota, ranking member of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, helped Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa craft an amendment to the Farm Bill that would nullify dozens - if not hundreds - of state laws, this was his explanation, clear and simple: "I'm tired of these states doing this crap. " And apparently a narrow majority of the House of Representatives agrees, since this amendment was included in the pared-down version of the Farm Bill that passed the House, 216-208.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1990
The Food and Drug Administration says it will test raw milk weekly around the nation to determine if it contains certain antibiotics.The agency said yesterday 250 locations across the country will be chosen for testing, and raw milk samples will be collected each week from five of these sites, selected randomly.The samples will be tested for the presence of eight sulfa drugs and three tetracycline drugs. The FDA said that when residues are found, the states will be told and the agency will help track down the source.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
The cows, about 75 of them, graze and enjoy an unseasonably warm day on the 260-acre Bellevale farm in Baltimore County, about 20 miles north of downtown. It's a few hours until milking time. Together they produce hundreds of gallons of raw milk that is sold to organic milk producer Horizon for about $3 a gallon. It's pasteurized and turned into cartons sold at the grocery store. Part of farmer Bobby Prigel thinks that's a shame. There are enough people in Maryland who would pay $6 a gallon or more for the unpasteurized, or raw, milk directly from him - if that were legal.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 15, 2007
Dairy farmer Donald Dell opened the lid of his 2,000-gallon milk tank, peering at the creamy white liquid inside. The tank is kept full by tubes that run to the nearby pumping station, where his 150 Holstein cows come to be milked. The Dells drink nothing but raw, unprocessed milk, straight from the tank. The family thinks that consumers should have the right to buy and drink nonpasteurized milk, too, and that the idea could help revive the state's ailing dairy industry, which has lost half of its milk producers in the last 15 years.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
Coal company fined $150,000 for pollution The Maryland Department of the Environment has fined the Mettiki Coal company $150,000 for emitting illegal amounts of air pollution from a processing plant in Western Maryland. The sulfur dioxide was released from a coal drying machine at 293 Table Rock Road in Oakland in May and June 2006, according to a consent decree filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. "Sulfur dioxide leads to the formation of fine particles that impact public health," state Environment Secretary Shari T. Wilson said in announcing the fine yesterday.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Six people were infected with Campylobacter by raw milk from the Family Cow dairy store in Chambersburg, Pa., including three in Maryland, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday. The bacteria causes diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and can progress into a more serious bloodstream infection, usually two to five days after exposure. The state agency and the health department in Pennsylvania are advising consumers to discard any product bought from this farm since Jan. 1. The implicated milk comes in plastic gallon, half gallon and pint containers and is sold directly to consumers on the farm and at drop off points and retail stores in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
The cows, about 75 of them, graze and enjoy an unseasonably warm day on the 260-acre Bellevale farm in Baltimore County, about 20 miles north of downtown. It's a few hours until milking time. Together they produce hundreds of gallons of raw milk that is sold to organic milk producer Horizon for about $3 a gallon. It's pasteurized and turned into cartons sold at the grocery store. Part of farmer Bobby Prigel thinks that's a shame. There are enough people in Maryland who would pay $6 a gallon or more for the unpasteurized, or raw, milk directly from him - if that were legal.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
Foodies across the nation prize Chesapeake Bay soft crabs. Our locally produced wines enjoy a growing reputation, too. There's stuffed ham in Southern Maryland and beaten biscuits from the Eastern Shore. But when it comes to cheese, Maryland regulations don't allow the kind of gourmet fare that's produced in other states. Fortunately, that's about to change. Legislation approved by the General Assembly this year and expected to be signed into law today by Gov. Martin O'Malley will for the first time legalize a limited production of raw milk cheese in Maryland.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1990
The Food and Drug Administration says it will test raw milk weekly around the nation to determine if it contains certain antibiotics.The agency said yesterday 250 locations across the country will be chosen for testing, and raw milk samples will be collected each week from five of these sites, selected randomly.The samples will be tested for the presence of eight sulfa drugs and three tetracycline drugs. The FDA said that when residues are found, the states will be told and the agency will help track down the source.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | February 25, 2006
What it is -- An artisanal cheese from Fiscalini Farms that blends strong yet subtle flavors. What we like about it --This handcrafted raw-milk cheese, made at a farmstead dairy in Modesto, Calif., has twice won top honors at the World Cheese Awards. It adds a sharp, but not overwhelming, taste to your cheese platter. Its texture is smooth but firm. What it costs --$16 for 16 ounces How to buy --Available at Eddie's of Roland Park and Whole Foods Market, at 800-610-FARM or fiscalinicheese.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 2, 2002
AS A LONGTIME proponent of supporting your local livestock, I was delighted the other night to feast on goat cheese that not only was remarkably good, but also was produced from milk drawn from Maryland goats. The milk for the cheese had been provided by 41 goats -- 30 Nubian and 11 Saanen -- who are Maryland residents. The goats dwell at FireFly Farms Organic Inc., a 130-acre spread in Bittinger in Garrett County. The farm is run by Mike Koch and Pablo Solanet, two young professionals who are part of the trend toward artisan cheese-making that we wrote about on this page last week.
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