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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
It's in everything from sandwich bags, microwaves and stereos to DVDs, cars and computers. Even the adhesive on shampoo labels and the caulking around bathtubs across America depends on it. Oil and natural gas are the base materials for chemicals and raw materials that show up in more than 90 percent of the consumer goods and packaging Americans take home from the mall. And just like the gas fueling American cars, those fossil fuel-based raw materials have gotten more expensive and harder to get in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as a result of the temporary loss of dozens of key chemical plants along the Gulf Coast.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | March 20, 2013
Buy a shirt, save the world. OK, it might not be that easy. But at Boulder, an eco-conscious clothing store for men, customers can do their part to make a difference in the environment. "Everything we do is centered around the environment, animal welfare and community," says general manager Evan Saulsbury. "We want you to feel good about how you look and know where your clothes come from. " Boulder, which opened this summer, is the latest addition to Conscious Corner in Clarksville -- a collection of businesses on Route 108 near River Hill that are focused on healthy and mindful living.
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BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | August 25, 2006
At the New Arts Foundry in Hampden, workers still follow the centuries-old process of casting bronze sculptures from molds of wax, rubber and ceramic. But owner Gary Siegel fears the business has irrevocably changed in a matter of months. Last year at this time, Siegel said, he was paying $1.60 a pound for the bronze alloy he uses, which is 95 percent copper. By May, it was $4.50 a pound - nearly triple what he had been paying. Metals prices have soared in the past year, and it's not only affecting foundries that make bronze sculptures, but manufacturers of products from power tools to tap shoes.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 2008
As oil costs surged this year, manufacturers raised the prices of a lot of products - not just gasoline but lotions, toothpaste, plastics and many more that use oil as a raw material. Now oil costs are plunging, but other prices are not. Even though oil prices have fallen toward $100 a barrel from $147 less than two months ago, many companies that cited higher energy costs for increasing prices are resisting a rollback, saying they still need to recover money lost in the run-up. Crude oil prices slid yesterday $5.75 a barrel to $109.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
Black & Decker Corp.'s chief financial officer warned analysts yesterday that the continuing housing slump and soaring raw materials costs will dampen sales and profit this year. The Towson-based manufacturer of power tools and hardware reported lower first-quarter earnings that nevertheless were better than expected, beating its own estimates as well as those of analysts. But CFO Michael Mangan said tough market conditions will likely persist through the end of the year. "While we are encouraged by our first-quarter results, we remain cautious about the macro environment," Mangan told analysts during a conference call.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 15, 2001
AKRON, Ohio - Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said yesterday that it's eliminating about 10,700 jobs over two years because raw material costs are rising and carmakers are producing fewer vehicles. The 10 percent work force reduction is expected to reduce costs by about $150 million this year and help cut costs by $500 million annually by 2005. Goodyear took a fourth-quarter charge of $93.7 million, or 59 cents a share, for the job cuts and plant consolidations, resulting in a loss of $102 million, or 65 cents.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
An early dispatch from the March economy arrived yesterday, and it suggested that last month's commercial activity mirrored January's and February's: strong growth, strong demand, little inflation.The National Association of Purchasing Management reported that U.S. manufacturing expanded at its fastest pace in more than two years in March, that raw materials prices were steady and that both new factory orders and backlogs were growing.The NAPM's index of factory activity, one of the first major indicators to appear after each month's end, climbed to 55.0 in March from 53.1 in February.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
Concrete and cement: Same thing, right?No, no, no, no, says David H. Roush, plant manager at the Lehigh Portland Cement Co., shaking his head emphatically."
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | April 2, 2000
It used to be that our economic fortunes were tied ever so closely to commodity prices. If prices rose too much, the economy slowed and the stock market slumped. And if they fell far enough, the economy accelerated and stock prices soared. That relationship between the prices of raw materials and the prices of stocks was even close enough to spawn a Wall Street aphorism: "Every bull market has a copper ceiling." On its face, that saying seems to make a lot of sense. Commodities -- raw materials such as oil or copper, or agricultural products like soybeans or wheat -- go into a lot of the products we buy. Plus, oil is used to make fuel or gasoline, which is needed to ship products to market via air or by truck.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 15, 1997
RICHMOND, Va. -- Prices for retail goods and services rose in several mid-Atlantic states in December, according to a survey released yesterday by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.The monthly survey of businesses in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, the Carolinas and the District of Columbia shows that prices for retail goods rose at an annual pace of 1.2 percent, below the 1.4 percent rise the previous month. Prices charged for services, meanwhile, rose at an annual rate of 1.0 percent last month, higher than November's 0.8 percent pace.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
Amid the prolonged housing downturn and subprime mortgage crisis, Black & Decker Corp. surprised many investors yesterday by reporting third-quarter profit that topped its own forecast and that of analysts. While profit fell 16 percent, the Towson manufacturer of power tools and home improvement products was buoyed by the results and boosted its outlook for the year. Black & Decker's stock shot up more than 8 percent, or $6.74, to close at $89.74. "As we have described all year, outstanding international sales growth mitigated weakness related to the U.S. housing industry," said Chief Financial Officer Michael D. Mangan in a conference call with analysts.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | September 30, 2007
A property owner cited for allowing a foundry-sand business to operate on his agriculturally zoned land in Keymar goes to Carroll County Circuit Court tomorrow for a hearing on whether the alleged industrial activity has stopped and equipment has been removed. In March, Judge Thomas F. Stansfield gave the family of Charles U. Mehring six months to remove all construction debris and materials housed on the property in the 1200 block of Bruceville Road by Bel Air-based International Minerals and Raw Materials Inc., a company that Mehring leased land to in 2003.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
Black & Decker Corp.'s chief financial officer warned analysts yesterday that the continuing housing slump and soaring raw materials costs will dampen sales and profit this year. The Towson-based manufacturer of power tools and hardware reported lower first-quarter earnings that nevertheless were better than expected, beating its own estimates as well as those of analysts. But CFO Michael Mangan said tough market conditions will likely persist through the end of the year. "While we are encouraged by our first-quarter results, we remain cautious about the macro environment," Mangan told analysts during a conference call.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
On Jan. 4, 1821, the hat factory owned by Col. Charles S. Sewell at Old Philadelphia Road and Abingdon Road began operation. From 1821 to 1824, Sewell's establishment turned out hats made of beaver, straw and wool for prices ranging from $1.25 to $6. Raw materials - including hat bands, linings, buckles, muslin, velvet and finishing blocks - were obtained from Baltimore. Hats were sold locally and shipped to Charlestown and North East from Otter Point aboard Sewell's schooner, which also transported flour, wheat, salt, iron ore and iron bar. The factory was destroyed by fire in 1822, but Sewell rebuilt and resumed operations within two months.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | August 25, 2006
At the New Arts Foundry in Hampden, workers still follow the centuries-old process of casting bronze sculptures from molds of wax, rubber and ceramic. But owner Gary Siegel fears the business has irrevocably changed in a matter of months. Last year at this time, Siegel said, he was paying $1.60 a pound for the bronze alloy he uses, which is 95 percent copper. By May, it was $4.50 a pound - nearly triple what he had been paying. Metals prices have soared in the past year, and it's not only affecting foundries that make bronze sculptures, but manufacturers of products from power tools to tap shoes.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 24, 2006
SEATTLE -- Weyerhaeuser Co. abandoned plans to sell its paper division yesterday, saying it will merge it with Canada's Domtar Inc. in a $3.3 billion transaction that will create North America's largest maker of paper used in facsimile and copying machines. Weyerhaeuser's shareholders will get a 55 percent stake in the new company. The American firm also will get a majority of the 13-member board, plus $1.35 billion in cash. The new company will have 14,000 employees, be based in Montreal and will be led by Raymond Royer, Domtar's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | October 27, 1990
Blaming increased costs for raw materials and labor, the Sparrows Point steel plant of Bethlehem Steel Corp., is planning to raise the price tag on its wares over the next two months.Like many of the nation's big steelmakers, Bethlehem Steel has seen demand for its steel products generally lag behind last year's robust levels.At the same time, as the economy continues to soften, Bethlehem's production costs for raw material and energy have risen."We've indicated [to our customers] that the reasons for the increases are our own production prices going up for raw materials, and some increases in labor," said Bethlehem spokesman Henry Von Spreckelsen yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno | March 13, 2005
Wall Street has been developing a better appreciation for classic smokestack businesses for the past two years, as the U.S. economy has revived and as China and other emerging economies have stoked demand for raw materials and all sorts of industrial goods. Lately, however, appreciation of commodity-related stocks has given way to near-panic buying. Some investors who paid no attention to these issues for a decade or longer - if ever - now seem willing to pay any price to get into them.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Squeezed by a slowing housing market and the rising cost for raw materials, Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. posted second-quarter results yesterday that missed forecasts and said earnings for the rest of the year will be lower than expected. Shares of Black & Decker fell to a 52-week low, shedding $5.22, or 6.8 percent, to $71.15. Earlier, shares were down nearly 10 percent. The nation's largest power tools maker reported slightly higher profit for the three months that ended June 30, thanks to manufacturing efficiencies, on flat sales.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 31, 2005
Gold finished the trading year yesterday with its fifth consecutive annual gain, and it also had the biggest quarterly gain since September 2003. Futures for February delivery rose $1.40 yesterday, or 0.3 percent, to $518.90 an ounce on the Comex. The trading session ended early for New Year's weekend. A futures contract is an obligation to sell or buy a commodity at a set price by a specific date. "Gold is a hot commodity now, so more people, especially large hedge funds, are paying attention," said Billy Flahive, a trader at Island Trading Group in New York.
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