Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRaw Bar
IN THE NEWS

Raw Bar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 7, 2007
A waterside Fells Point eatery has brought a little more of the sea inside. Last weekend, Shucker's Restaurant and Bar opened its new raw bar. Tony Lombardi - who owns Shucker's with Andy Rosenthal - says the room used to be one of two main dining rooms. Now, the room is more of a bar/lounge area. When you walk in the restaurant's front door off the Broadway Pier, you can go left of the big 400-gallon fish tank into the main dining room, the main bar or a back bar/lounge. Or you can turn right, where you'll find a long Corian-topped bar, divided in the middle by the large iced fresh seafood display set behind a wall of glass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Pop-up shops - businesses that open temporarily to present new concepts before hopefully graduating to a permanent location - make sense, especially in Baltimore. We can be a capricious group to impress, so a business that chooses to refine its execution on a small scale, rather than commit to a formidable lease too soon, is acting wisely. Opened by Phil Han of Dooby's last summer, the Hatch is a business incubator located in the lower-level space of the Park Plaza in Mount Vernon.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Fells Point, a waterfront neighborhood, has had a historic shortage of good seafood restaurants. There are one or two very good high-end choices, but the casual options are meager and the mid-range options non-existent. Here comes Thames Street Oyster House , which in the few weeks since its opening has been drawing a steady stream of customers. Part of the instant success at Thames Street has to do with the popular owner, Candace Beattie, who developed a following behind the bar at nearby Alexander's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Guests at Saturday's Preakness will get the first slurp of the Skinny Dipper, a new oyster from True Chesapeake Oyster Co., an oyster farm in St. Mary's County. The Skinny Dipper will be supplied to Baltimore-area restaurants beginning this summer, but it will get some high-profile attention at Saturday's race, where it has been named the "preferred oyster of Preakness," according to a press announcement. The Skinny Dipper will be presented at the raw bar inside Preakness Village, the event's corporate entertaining area, where the menu is being created by "Top Chef" contestant Mike Isabella.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
John E. Larkin Jr., a seafood dealer whose raw oyster bar became a popular downtown gathering place, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Catonsville resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he attended Leonard Hall Junior Naval Academy and was a 1955 Mount St. Joseph High School graduate. Family members said that he remained close to his teachers, members of the Xaverian Brothers, throughout his life. He entered the seafood business as a young man. Multiple generations of Larkins had worked in the Baltimore seafood industry and owned stalls at Lexington, Hollins and Belair markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | January 3, 1992
Not that The Crease has official landmark status or anything, but this Towson restaurant-bar was the Ur-Yup bar when it opened in 1972. While there's no denying that the local courthouse, public library and nearby university gave some daytime value to the community, the night belonged to The Crease.So imagine the shock waves that rumbled through the Baltimore County seat when The Crease was shut down by the Internal Revenue Service for non-payment of back taxes last April. Was this yet another sign that the upscale '80s had truly ended?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2005
August may be the time for folks to go away. This year, it seems it's also the time for some local restaurants to disappear. The popular Owings Mills bistro Due closed recently. However, its food can still be found in its sister restaurant, Linwood's, right next door. One of Linwood's managers, Rachel Zundell, says the Due menu was rolled into that of Linwood's. The Due space is being turned into a catering venue. Linwood's Restaurant, 410-356-3030, is at 25 Crossroads Drive. Lunch is served 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Mark your calendars. The Tiki Barge has set April 13 as its opening date for the season. Tiki's manager Bud Craven confirmed the news Thursday. Craven is still nursing his wounds from a March Liquor Board hearing that denied his plans to build a seafood restaurant and raw bar barge right next to the existing Tiki. At the time, the board concluded that the foot traffic to the combined barges would be too heavy for Harborview Marina.  When the old Tiki Barge re-opens next Friday, it'll be back to what fans have gotten accustomed to for the past two years, Craven said.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Bucking Columbia's trend toward chain restaurants, two independently owned eating places -- Sonoma's Bar and Grille and Columbia Crab House and Raw Bar -- have opened in Owen Brown village in the past few months.Sonoma's, which serves seafood, salads and Southwestern-style dishes, opened in the village center about three weeks ago and had its grand opening Friday, said Steve Heintzelman, owner and operator.The 15-employee restaurant is in the space formerly occupied by Cover to Cover bookstore and cafe that was renovated during the past several months, Heintzelman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 16, 1994
Although there's nothing you love as much as a fat, briny oyster on the half shell straight from the sea, you've gotten a little nervous about raw shellfish lately. Oysters Rockefeller are good, but sometimes the oysters get lost among the spinach and Pernod. What to do?Well, you might try the baked oysters casino at Michael's Cafe, Raw Bar and Grill. It's an unorthodox treatment, but the kitchen resists loading down these plump beauties with bread crumbs. Each has a bit of crisp bacon and seasoned butter and is baked just long enough.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
As the hosts of one of the most coveted annual Super Bowl parties in Maryland, Steve and Zivah Ring have obligations to uphold. So what if they had planned on spending much of the winter in sunny Florida? After the Ravens secured the AFC championship two weeks ago, the Rings hopped a plane back to frigid Baltimore. "We came into town just to throw this party," said Zivah Ring of Stevenson. "And we're leaving again right afterwards. " Over the past 47 years, Super Bowl Sunday has morphed from just another blah winter weekend day into an unofficial national holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
J. Paul's has embraced its location. The Harborplace restaurant, which originally opened in 1997, reopened last June after an eight-month renovation. With six months under its belt, the revamped restaurant's food is mostly on point, but the staff still seems to be working out a few kinks. The space is smaller than it was before, but open, airy and noticeably nautical. With ropes here and shiny metal ship fixtures there, the room is welcoming, if a bit too bright. Right now, the restaurant's white walls and floors seem stark, but in the summer months, when floor-to-ceiling windows facing the water open out to the harbor, those touches will likely feel fresh.
EXPLORE
By Chris Korman and Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | November 6, 2012
Twenty-two patrons waited outside the door to the rebuilt Mount Washington Tavern Tuesday, ready to pull up to the bar as soon as the doors were flung open at 4 p.m. for the first time in more than a year. Many of them lived or worked nearby and had wept when they saw the charred stone standing among smoldering remains after a fire destroyed the restaurant last Halloween. They'd spent the intervening year watching Dave Lichty and Rob Frisch, the longtime employees who bought the establishment in 2008 with promises to preserve it as it was, assist contractors in the rebuilding.
TRAVEL
May 25, 2012
Whether you want to relax at its Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spa or want to dance all night at the massive nightclub, The Pool, Harrah's offers many different options for an Atlantic City trip. Casino hours: 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Games to play: There are 170 table games of craps, roulette, big six and more. There are also 2,722 slot machines. Entertainment: Concerts and shows range from stand-up comedian Ron White (June 16) to Irish folk band Celtic Thunder (June 27)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Mark your calendars. The Tiki Barge has set April 13 as its opening date for the season. Tiki's manager Bud Craven confirmed the news Thursday. Craven is still nursing his wounds from a March Liquor Board hearing that denied his plans to build a seafood restaurant and raw bar barge right next to the existing Tiki. At the time, the board concluded that the foot traffic to the combined barges would be too heavy for Harborview Marina.  When the old Tiki Barge re-opens next Friday, it'll be back to what fans have gotten accustomed to for the past two years, Craven said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Ryleigh's Oyster in Federal Hill now has its own oyster -- Avery's Pearls, named after Avery McComas, the younger daughter of the restaurant's owners, Jennifer and Brian McComas. Ryleigh's itself was named after their elder daughter, Ryleigh. Avery's Pearls are a collaboration between Ryleigh's and the Shooting Point Oyster Co., a family-owned oyster farm located in a remote stretch of Virginia's Eastern Shore. All aspects of their cultivation, from size, salinity levels, shape and overall appearance were jointly developed in what is being called a first of its kind restaurant-farm partnership.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
Hours after the black-tie New Year's Eve party at McGarvey's Saloon in Annapolis, a three-alarm fire struck the downtown landmark. Only one section of the business was damaged, and there were no injuries."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
Hours after the black-tie New Year's Eve bash at McGarvey's Saloon in Annapolis, a three-alarm fire struck the downtown landmark. One section of the business was damaged by fire, and no one was injured."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Heavy Seas Alehouse is open. The new restaurant, the first to carry the name of the popular Baltimore-based brewery, opened its doors very quietly on Tuesday night, a week ahead of its announced official opening. Heavy Seas Alehouse, which has described itself as a neighborhood tavern, takes over the Tack Factory space formerly occupied by Tsunami and Diablita. Technically, the location is Little Italy, but most people think of it as Harbor East. Construction on the restaurant began last November, just around the time that the first announcement of the project was made.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
On the morning a fire devasted the Mt. Washington Tavern, its two owners, Rob Frisch and Dave Lichty, rushed to the scene convinced the incident would be minor. "While we were driving down, my wife said, 'I still have to get a Halloween costume because I'm bartending tonight,'" Lichty said. "We didn't know what were walking into. " The two owners had been working at the restaurant since their early 20s, each doing his best to keep together a bar and restaurant that was famous for its consistency and that had become a mainstay in the city, and especially during the annual Preakness Stakes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.