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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
NEW YORK -- Baseball's latest labor dispute moved into the late innings yesterday, when a contentious, three-hour bargaining session did nothing to dissuade the Major League Baseball Players Association from setting a strike deadline when its executive board meets by conference call this afternoon.Ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch formally -- and forcefully -- rejected a union contract proposal that he said would raise the players' share of revenue as much as $700 million during the next four years.
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By Kalman R. Hettleman | October 20, 2013
Diane Ravitch is all the rage in education circles these days, but rage, unfortunately, is what's she's selling. There are many reasons why, despite decades of efforts, U.S. public schools continue to fail, especially for low-income and minority children. Perhaps the most destructive one is the polarization of the debate over school reform and the refusal of opposing factions to look for middle ground. Sad to say, Ms. Ravitch's new best-selling book, "Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools," fits this pattern.
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SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- When Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos took the unusual step last spring of disclosing the team's most sensitive financial records -- documents showing hefty but declining profits -- he urged his fellow owners to do the same.No one did.Now, as they court public support for a plan that would bring radical change to baseball's economic system, owners still aren't allowing Joe Fan to see their records, even though their chief labor negotiator believes they should.Richard Ravitch, the owners' negotiator, said yesterday that he has encouraged the 28 clubs to go public with information that Ravitch says would show as many as 19 teams projecting operating losses this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 22, 2003
If Diane Ravitch's The Language Police (Knopf, 255 pages, $24) gets the attention it deserves, it could do for the failures of education in the United States what Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin did for slavery. Subtitled "How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn," it is a brilliant revelation of an insidious national disease of public policy. This book may be the most important document about the future of the American mind in a generation or more. It should be obligatory reading for every citizen concerned with the intellectual, moral, and imaginative life of U.S. children and society as a whole.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this article | August 14, 1993
KOHLER, Wis. -- The hour was late, and Richard Ravitch was tired to the bone, working on just an hour of sleep during a two-day period.But in the midst of his grogginess and his inability to get owners and representatives of the 28 major-league teams to agree to a revenue-sharing plan, Ravitch had the presence to pull a little sleight of hand early yesterday morning.Ravitch, president of the Player Relations Committee, the owners' bargaining arm with the players association, said the owners would not lock the players out of spring training in 1994, even if the sides haven't finished negotiations for a collective bargaining agreement.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 28, 1993
Richard Ravitch is on a mission. He spent last week in Florida talking to reporters, talking to players and trying to convince the world that baseball ownership is not crying wolf again.Ravitch, who heads Major League Baseball's Player Relations Committee, has the task of negotiating a collective-bargaining agreement with the players union. And the emphasis is on the word "new." The owners have made it obvious that come next year, they will not start a new season with the old economic problems.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | June 13, 1993
Interleague play and three-division realignment are out unti 1995, at the earliest."Too many clubs feel there are too many bugs in it to vote until later this summer," said Bud Selig, owner of the Milwaukee Brewers and chairman of the governing executive council.However, the major-league owners, meeting in Denver on Wednesday and Thursday, are expected to approve an expanded playoff concept that would have both the American and National Leagues remaining in two divisions, with either the second-place finishers in each division qualifying for the playoffs or the four teams with the best percentages after the winners.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
KOHLER, Wis. -- After meeting for nearly 31 hours, presumably to begin to put baseball's financial house in order with revenue sharing and a cap on players' salaries, representatives of the 28 major-league teams left here early today without settling anything.The owners left the posh American Club resort hotel just before midnight without having taken a vote on the packaged concepts of distributing their individual wealth among all of the teams and placing a cap on player salaries, a notion that was sure to bring a player walkout.
SPORTS
August 4, 1994
Fans of ESPN's Chris Berman know him as the all-sports network's colorful anchorman and as the preening play-by- play announcer on the annual "Bud Bowl" commercials. Now, Berman has joined the ranks of book authors with the publication of "Chris Names," a compilation of his funny and outrageous sports nicknames. A portion of the proceeds from the book benefit the "V Foundation for Cancer Research," established in memory of Berman's late colleague Jim Valvano. Berman spoke recently with Sun staff writer Mark Hyman.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
NEW YORK -- There they were again, ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch and players union chief Donald Fehr telling the world for the umpteenth time that there was little reason for hope that the baseball strike might end in the foreseeable future.Federal mediators met with each side separately yesterday to talk about resuming negotiations, but there was -- again -- nothing to talk about. No formal talks were scheduled and any hope of resuming the 1994 season could be extinguished in the next few days.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2002
IT TOOK education historian Diane Ravitch to put the latest U.S. history test results, released this month, in perspective. Fourth- and eighth-graders nationally showed some competence in the 2001 test, Ravitch noted. But what about high school seniors, the students closest to voting age? They "registered truly abysmal scores, and showed no improvement since the [National Assessment of Educational Progress] history assessment was last given in 1994," Ravitch said. "One can only feel alarm that they know so little about their nation's history and express so little capacity to reflect on its meaning."
SPORTS
April 3, 1995
A chronology of the current baseball labor dispute:Dec. 7, 1992: Player Relations Committee chairman Richard Ravitch announces that the owners will reopen collectivebargaining, pursue revenue sharing and a salary cap.Aug. 10-12, 1993: Owners meet in Kohler, Wis., to try to devise a revenue-sharing plan, but are unable to agree on a way to help small-market clubs.Aug. 17, 1993: Owners give the union a written pledge that they will not lock out players during 1994 season and will not institute new working conditions during the winter.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | December 6, 1994
ATLANTA -- It is both a briefing and a brainstorming session, but the three-day executive board meeting convened by the Major League Baseball Players Association yesterday is not likely to change the chemistry of baseball's long-running labor dispute.The players union is expected to come away with a counterproposal to the taxation plan that management put on the bargaining table Nov. 17, but even that is not a certainty. It will be up to the 75 players in attendance to decide whether one last attempt at compromise is worth the effort.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
RYE BROOK, N.Y. -- Negotiating teams in the Major League Baseball strike finally returned to the bargaining table yesterday, and both sides expressed hope that their six-hour discussion will be a prelude to more serious talks.Special mediator William J. Usery brought the bargaining units together at the Doral Arrowwood Conference Center outside New York for a series of meetings that could last through the weekend. No progress was reported but -- unlike previous attempts at negotiation -- both sides appeared eager to meet again today.
SPORTS
September 15, 1994
Baseball's labor dispute dates to the December 1992 decision by the owners to reopen collective bargaining with the players one year before the expiration of the last labor contract.CHRONOLOGYDec. 7, 1992: Player Relations Committee chairman Richard Ravitch announces that the owners will reopen collectivebargaining and pursue revenue sharing and a salary cap.Aug. 10-12, 1993: Owners meet in Kohler, Wis., to try to devise a revenue-sharing plan, but are unable to agree on a way to help small-market clubs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
NEW YORK -- There they were again, ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch and players union chief Donald Fehr telling the world for the umpteenth time that there was little reason for hope that the baseball strike might end in the foreseeable future.Federal mediators met with each side separately yesterday to talk about resuming negotiations, but there was -- again -- nothing to talk about. No formal talks were scheduled and any hope of resuming the 1994 season could be extinguished in the next few days.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
The latest round of baseball's muddled labor negotiations is scheduled to begin today in New York with the two sides, as usual, seeking very different outcomes.For the Major League Baseball Players Association, the goal is to maintain the status quo. Keep intact the salary system that has sent the average player's pay soaring over $1 million. Leave a generous benefits package undisturbed. Give back nothing.The owners will come from the opposite direction. They will paint a picture of baseball on the edge, of franchises awash in red ink and of a sport doomed unless the players agree to major changes in their salary structure.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
NEW YORK -- There is one thing that you should know about Donald Fehr and Richard Ravitch. No matter the salary, and it would be quite substantial, you do not want to trade places with either of them right now.Fehr is the executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association. Ravitch is the chief negotiator for the 28 owners who make up the entity known as Major League Baseball. But you already know that.They have become two of the most recognizable personalities on the planet, and that is a mixed blessing when there are millions of people out there who think of them as the grinches who stole baseball.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
If there is any hope of saving the rest of the 1994 baseball season, it lies in the ability of federal mediators to persuade the players and owners to tone down their angry rhetoric and make a serious attempt to reach a settlement.That may be easier said than done, but mediation chief John Calhoun Wells will bring the sides together today to lay the ground rules for the next phase of negotiations and map out a schedule for the resumption of collective bargaining.The mediation team will meet with Major League Baseball Players Association director Donald Fehr and ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch today, then meet separately with the two bargaining units tomorrow before full-scale negotiations resume -- probably on Wednesday.
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