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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - Professor Mike Raupp is close to his subject of scholarly study. Very close. When a fiercely buzzing bee lands on a flower beside him, he leans over to pet it. "A sweet bumblebee," he says, stretching out a finger to stroke its fuzzy yellow back. The bee, fortunately, doesn't seem to mind. Then again, Raupp doesn't have an ordinary mortal's fear of getting stung. He's a fan of spiders. He collects strange beetles. He lets mosquitoes bite him. He considers bumblebees "docile" and likes to play with a scary-looking "assassin bug" on his office desk.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
A brown marmorated stink bug caught Michael Raupp's attention as it wandered around the spindly trunk of a zelkova tree. Lately, the entomologist has been noticing the pests everywhere - even on the small species of elm growing in front of a Columbia coffee shop. Raupp, a University of Maryland professor and "Bug of the Week" blogger who lives in Columbia, says stink bugs "are going to be big" in a couple of weeks. The half-inch, shield-shaped critters will be making their presence known in Howard County and elsewhere from mid-September through the end of October, when the first frost of autumn blankets the ground.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says: "I can't remember a year that the annual, aka dog-day, cicadas have been as abundant and active." I've noticed them, too. Unlike their "periodical" cousins, which emerge from the ground every 13 or 17 years in messy and noisy springtime invasions (most recently in 2004), these annual cicadas appear in late July, almost unnoticed except for their chattering love songs in the trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | October 8, 2009
My daughter, Jessie, returned home after a summer of living with friends, but the stink that arrived with her wasn't from dirty laundry. It was from the brown marmorated stink bugs that were trying to return home for the winter, too. They had clustered around her bedroom window on the sunny side of the house and were working their way into her room, probably through the louvers in the air conditioner in her window. As you might guess, there were howls of protest from Jessie, who was also hassled by bats this summer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
So who's that tap, tap, tapping on your window pane? If it's a warm day in this autumn season, the visitor could be the multicolored Asian lady beetle. The pesky import gobbles scads of garden pests every year, but expects free winter housing in return. "I was working at home and noticed these things crashing into my front window," said University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp. "They were quite numerous on the southern exposure of the house, where it was warm." Later, walking on campus at College Park, Raupp spotted scores of them sunning themselves on the columns of south-facing buildings.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
Something is making Baltimore-area trees let loose so much moisture that people, thinking the skies have opened, are reaching for umbrellas and running for cover. What in the name of Arbor Day is the deal? Not an actual weather disturbance or copious amounts of morning dew. The water mains are fine and air-conditioners blameless. A coming apocalypse seems about as likely as extra-terrestrials or sad tree tears. Dozens of such hypotheses - more creative than credible - have surfaced to explain the weeping tree phenomenon, where typically unassuming maples and poplars drop buckets of mysterious liquid, so much that it's being mistaken for a misty rain.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
As if the mosquitoes weren't bad enough, the rainy weather in recent weeks has also brought out another insect pest - swarming termites, streaming up out of the ground, or the woodwork. Michael Short, an inspector for J.C. Ehrlich Pest Control in Baltimore, was called recently to a home in Owings Mills. The winged critters were "all over the floor in the foyer, literally covering the foyer," he said. "The customer was obviously very concerned." The bugs weren't out to eat the house, just to mate and establish new colonies.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
For Steve Watkins, the questions about cankerworms have become a rite of spring. How should he go about eradicating the pests infesting his tree nursery in Pasadena? How much time and effort should go into it? And, what should he tell his customers, who visit Himmel's Farm & Garden Center looking for solutions to the problem? "There's only so much you can do with a 12-ounce bottle of insecticide," said Watkins, who has watched the insects at his two-acre nursery eat the leaves on everything from dogwood to hickory trees.
NEWS
By DORCAS TAYLOR and DORCAS TAYLOR,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2005
A sudden resurgence of gypsy moth egg clusters in Garrett County, combined with this year's drought, could mean trouble for the state's forests next spring. Bob Tichenor, the chief of forest pest management at the Maryland Department of Agriculture, said forest entomologists tell him the tan groupings are "some of the largest egg masses we've ever seen." Some areas of Garrett County are seeing more than 500 clusters per acre, with the masses measuring up to 1.5 inches and holding 1,200 eggs, Tichenor said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 14, 2004
I smell death in the air. Where once the trees were alive with noise, now there's only the labored wheezing of a few desperate holdouts. Where once there was the haunting beauty of pale-green bodies and translucent wings and beady red eyes, now the sidewalks are littered with tiny brown carcasses. It's all over. The Grim Insect Reaper is at the door. Oh, god, this isn't another stupid cicada column, is it? Man, are you milking this thing, or what? What's this, your fifth or sixth column on cicadas?
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says: "I can't remember a year that the annual, aka dog-day, cicadas have been as abundant and active." I've noticed them, too. Unlike their "periodical" cousins, which emerge from the ground every 13 or 17 years in messy and noisy springtime invasions (most recently in 2004), these annual cicadas appear in late July, almost unnoticed except for their chattering love songs in the trees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
As if the mosquitoes weren't bad enough, the rainy weather in recent weeks has also brought out another insect pest - swarming termites, streaming up out of the ground, or the woodwork. Michael Short, an inspector for J.C. Ehrlich Pest Control in Baltimore, was called recently to a home in Owings Mills. The winged critters were "all over the floor in the foyer, literally covering the foyer," he said. "The customer was obviously very concerned." The bugs weren't out to eat the house, just to mate and establish new colonies.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
For Steve Watkins, the questions about cankerworms have become a rite of spring. How should he go about eradicating the pests infesting his tree nursery in Pasadena? How much time and effort should go into it? And, what should he tell his customers, who visit Himmel's Farm & Garden Center looking for solutions to the problem? "There's only so much you can do with a 12-ounce bottle of insecticide," said Watkins, who has watched the insects at his two-acre nursery eat the leaves on everything from dogwood to hickory trees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
So who's that tap, tap, tapping on your window pane? If it's a warm day in this autumn season, the visitor could be the multicolored Asian lady beetle. The pesky import gobbles scads of garden pests every year, but expects free winter housing in return. "I was working at home and noticed these things crashing into my front window," said University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp. "They were quite numerous on the southern exposure of the house, where it was warm." Later, walking on campus at College Park, Raupp spotted scores of them sunning themselves on the columns of south-facing buildings.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
Something is making Baltimore-area trees let loose so much moisture that people, thinking the skies have opened, are reaching for umbrellas and running for cover. What in the name of Arbor Day is the deal? Not an actual weather disturbance or copious amounts of morning dew. The water mains are fine and air-conditioners blameless. A coming apocalypse seems about as likely as extra-terrestrials or sad tree tears. Dozens of such hypotheses - more creative than credible - have surfaced to explain the weeping tree phenomenon, where typically unassuming maples and poplars drop buckets of mysterious liquid, so much that it's being mistaken for a misty rain.
NEWS
By DORCAS TAYLOR and DORCAS TAYLOR,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2005
A sudden resurgence of gypsy moth egg clusters in Garrett County, combined with this year's drought, could mean trouble for the state's forests next spring. Bob Tichenor, the chief of forest pest management at the Maryland Department of Agriculture, said forest entomologists tell him the tan groupings are "some of the largest egg masses we've ever seen." Some areas of Garrett County are seeing more than 500 clusters per acre, with the masses measuring up to 1.5 inches and holding 1,200 eggs, Tichenor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | October 8, 2009
My daughter, Jessie, returned home after a summer of living with friends, but the stink that arrived with her wasn't from dirty laundry. It was from the brown marmorated stink bugs that were trying to return home for the winter, too. They had clustered around her bedroom window on the sunny side of the house and were working their way into her room, probably through the louvers in the air conditioner in her window. As you might guess, there were howls of protest from Jessie, who was also hassled by bats this summer.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - Professor Mike Raupp is close to his subject of scholarly study. Very close. When a fiercely buzzing bee lands on a flower beside him, he leans over to pet it. "A sweet bumblebee," he says, stretching out a finger to stroke its fuzzy yellow back. The bee, fortunately, doesn't seem to mind. Then again, Raupp doesn't have an ordinary mortal's fear of getting stung. He's a fan of spiders. He collects strange beetles. He lets mosquitoes bite him. He considers bumblebees "docile" and likes to play with a scary-looking "assassin bug" on his office desk.
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