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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | November 16, 1994
Wow again! The Lot 13 released last year was a longsho winner with its ripe, full-bodied flavors. This year's non-vintage version is just a little finer -- not more bulky but more tightly focused. Marietta remains one of the best values in the marketplace, from anywhere or at any price. You have to taste it to believe it. Scoop it up fast, because most stores who carry Marietta are rationing it to their best customers.
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NEWS
By New York Times | January 2, 1991
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Basic food items are such as eggs and fresh milk have either disappeared or are priced beyond the reach of most Iraqi families after four months of a total trade embargo."
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 13, 1992
ORDINARILY, I am not enamored of the Bush administration's health policies. But the administration did a good deed when it vetoed Oregon's proposed system of rationed care under that state's Medicaid program.The Oregon plan sought simultaneously to expand coverage to some 120,000 Oregonians who are currently uninsured, while holding down costs through aggressive case management and a novel system of automatic rationing. The system thus appealed to liberals who wanted to broaden medical coverage, and to conservatives who hoped to hold down costs.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly | January 8, 1992
50 Years Ago (week of Jan. 4-10, 1942):* Howard County's tire-rationing board was formed this week. Under the tire-rationing system, automobile owners wishing to purchase tires were required to visit a designated inspection station where they were given application forms. The applications were filled out and presented to the tire rationing board for approval. If an application was approved, the car owner would be given a purchase slip allowing him or her to purchase tires.* A Civilian Defense medical emergency room was set up this week in the Post Office building on Main Street in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | October 18, 1992
From The Sun Oct. 18-24, 1842Oct. 18: We have before us the facts connected with a gross insult offered to a highly respectable lady, on Friday evening last, by an individual professing to be a gentleman. The circumstance took place in Pitt near Front street.Oct. 24: About six o'clock on Saturday morning, we've learned, a duel was fought at Burlington, N.J., between two midshipmen of the U.S. Navy.From The Sun Oct. 18-24, 1892Oct. 18: The summer social festivities of the several hundred fashionable folk who live in and around Catonsville came to an end last night with a german in Library Hall.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | March 12, 1995
"TC 25 Years Ago* The Computer Problem Solving Project in which Frederick County is participating jointly with Allegany, Carroll, Howard, Montgomery and Washington counties is now in operation. Tele-typewriter computer terminals are installed in two local schools, North Frederick Elementary School and Gov. Thomas Johnson High School. Computer-assisted instruction, as demonstrated by the local project, provides an experience unique among mass communication instructional media. Other media such as television, motion pictures or radio require only passive behavior on the part of the learner; the computer demands active behavior.
NEWS
By Patrick E. Tyler and Patrick E. Tyler,New York Times News Service | January 2, 1991
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- After four months of total trade embargo, the government of President Saddam Hussein is encountering increasingly serious shortages in the government food-rationing program that has helped Iraq sustain its defiance of the United Nations demand that it end its occupation of Kuwait.Since September, Iraqi families have suffered declines of 25 percent to 50 percent in the amount of basic food items they are able to get in government stores by redeeming the rationing coupons issued to each family, Iraqi residents and foreign diplomats monitoring the program say.A food coupon that allotted 17.6 pounds of wheat flour for each person per month in September can be redeemed today for only 11 pounds of flour.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | December 14, 1990
WE NEED universal health insurance because 37 million Americans have no health insurance to pay the doctor, right?Wrong. Our present system does leave a lot of people out -- but that's not the worst thing that ails it. Worse still is how it squanders scarce resources and increasingly denies freedom of choice to consumers.Conservative critics will tell you that universal health systems like the Canadian one are guilty of the sin of "rationing." The Wall Street Journal recently RobertKuttnerran an editorial column titled, "Canadians Cross Border to Save Their Lives."
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 24, 1994
WHATEVER bill is passed eventually, Bill Clinton will get credit for it." So says a leading political analyst regarding proposed health care reform. He reflects the conventional wisdom that President Clinton is due acclaim for bringing health care to the table.I disagree. The Hillary plan, if enacted, would be a farrago of bureaucratic inefficiencies, economic dislocations, rationing, declining quality and corruption. And even if the chances of such a bill passing are remote, the Clintons deserve censure for forcing sensible people to marshal forces in opposition to it.Bill and Hillary Clinton think they can play with the American economy the way children play Monopoly.
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