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By John M. Freeman | February 8, 2010
Current medical practice is enormously expensive, often without clear long-term benefits. A few examples: End-of-life care at New York University averaged $105,000 per patient in the last two years of life, without evident improvement in mortality rates. Costs at other centers were nearly as high, also without evident benefits. Studies document that providing intensive care to infants born at 22-23 weeks resulted in more than 1,700 extra days in intensive care, with fewer than 20 percent of the infants surviving -- only 3 percent without profound impairment.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014
I agree with Ned Tillman's commentary ( "Reducing carbon emissions has practical benefits ," June 12) touting the health and economic virtues of replacing coal-fired power with non-fossil sources, which is one likely outcome of the new EPA rules announced this month. But the possibilities are even better if Congress will wake up to their responsibility to help meet the challenge of lowering greenhouse gas emissions. According to a study just released by Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI)
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
The United States will soon be forced to make brutal choices about rationing health care as the costs continue to outpace society's ability to pay for treatments, a Johns Hopkins anesthesiologist told a national conference yesterday.While he did not offer a rationing plan of his own, Dr. Mark C. Rogers said intensive-care physicians may have to curtail "futile attempts at saving lives" and the use of experimental drugs, some of which cost $3,000 per dose, if there is little chance the drugs will work.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
When Navy won the opening faceoff of Saturday's eventual 21-12 thrashing of Patriot League foe Holy Cross, the offense was composed of the usual starters on attack - and the players who make up the second midfield. Seniors Austin Heneveld and Sean Price and sophomore Kevin Wendel took the field with the starting attack of seniors Sam Jones and Tucker Hull and sophomore T.J. Hanzsche. But before any conspiracy theories begin hatching, coach Rick Sowell said the second line took the first possession because Heneveld was already on the field as a wing player on the faceoff unit.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | April 5, 1993
AMERICANS want health care that's affordable. But are we prepared for rationing?If you're used to the highest technological medical advances, which we are, why would you want to forgo expensive treatments simply because government bureaucrats have determined it's not cost-effective to keep you alivefor a measly year or two or five?Or what about having to pass up surgery for a terrible backache because it's not a life-threatening condition?And what about age? Should older people be denied certain costly treatments so that younger people can get them?
NEWS
By Youssef M. Ibrahim and Youssef M. Ibrahim,New York Times News Service | October 28, 1990
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Iraq's recent announcement that it would ration gasoline was a maneuver to persuade Baghdad's enemies to postpone any attack on Iraqi forces occupying Kuwait, several Kuwaiti oil industry executives and European military affairs experts say.The rationing announcement, the experts said, was intended to give the impression that the United Nations economic sanctions against Iraq were working well enough to make an attack by the United...
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | October 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If President Clinton's health reform plan becomes law, millions of Americans may begin to hear a word to which they're unaccustomed at the doctor's office: No.Mr. Clinton would force health plans -- groups of insurers, doctors and hospitals -- to live under tight budgets, with limits on the premiums that people would be charged for health care.Administration officials strongly deny that any kind of rationing would result. But many experts believe that the pressure on health plans to control costs would force them to refuse patients access to some tests and treatments.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 28, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- A quota imposed on the purchase of subsidized gasoline sent Iranians into the streets yesterday, where they torched at least 12 gas stations, damaged government-owned banks and department stores and shouted slogans against the president, Iranian news agencies and witnesses reported. To limit rapidly increasing consumption of gasoline, the government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad began enforcing a rationing program yesterday that limits most motorists to 26.4 gallons a month at the subsidized price of 42 cents per gallon.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 13, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ruling that federal law gives HMOs a clear right to cut costs by providing less expensive treatment, a unanimous Supreme Court yesterday barred federal court lawsuits against managed-care doctors and organizations when they ration medical services. Even if an HMO's doctors get paid a bonus or a share of the savings for lower-cost treatment, the court said, patients have no right under federal health benefits law to sue for damages for what they consider inadequate care. "No HMO organization could survive without some incentive connecting physician reward with treatment rationing," Justice David H. Souter wrote for the court.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | October 16, 1994
50 Years Ago* The Carroll County Rationing Board announces that fourth-quarter gasoline rations for trucks are ready for distribution and may be called for at the Rationing Board in Westminster on and after Friday, Sept. 29. -- Democratic Advocate, Oct. 6, 1944.75 Years Ago* Dr. Richard Lynch Garner announced his intention of establishing a colony of chimpanzees and gorillas in the United States to uplift the entire ape race. The professor said he believes apes, if given the advantage of modern education, would develop into a race that would sow and reap and toil.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
A cliché used to excuse those who break the immigration laws is that violators simply want "to make a better life for themselves. " But this argument is the same argument that applies to all crime. Thieves don't have enough money so they steal to make a better life for themselves. Should we stop enforcing all our criminal statutes simply because the criminals want to make a better life for themselves? We should stop trying to rationalize criminal behavior and start enforcing our immigration laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
In stepping down last week as a speaker at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine commencement, Dr. Ben Carson again took on the role of media/culture critic and martyr to "political correctness. " "Someday in the future, it is my hope and prayer that the emphasis on political correctness will decrease and we will start emphasizing rational discussion of differences so we can actually resolve problems and chart a course that is inclusive of everyone," he wrote to Hopkins Medicine Dean and CEO Dr. Paul B. Rothman.
NEWS
January 30, 2013
Robert Yentzer has made a common but fundamental error in his commentary, "The deficit control policy Democrats and Republicans can both love" (Jan. 29). Regarding Social Security, seniors must spend a considerably larger proportion of their income on health care than the general population. And health care costs are rising much faster than the general cost of living. Any policy that cuts the very meager Social Security distribution to seniors, such as the "chained CPI," would be a devastating blow to seniors' quality of life.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
The announcement this week that the U.S. Department of Education will grant Maryland a waiver from some of the more onerous requirements of the decade-old federal No Child Left Behind Act is welcome news for the state's school reform effort. It means Maryland will be free to set more reasonable goals for student achievement levels and adopt reforms that are necessary to close the gap between its lowest- and highest-performing schools and school districts. Maryland needs a more rational and balanced approach to measuring educational progress, and now it can create one without having to wait for lawmakers in Washington to act. The decade-old NCLB law, passed by Congress with broad bipartisan support, was the signature education initiative of the Bush administrationt.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 11, 2012
Sometimes, it is worth our time to step back, to take the long view about seemingly intractable issues affecting our country. My long view begins with the gas line days of 1973-74, when a recently minted owner of a 1966 Ford Falcon began the daily commute between his home in Arbutus and Gilman School in Roland Park. Domestically, huge price hikes at the pump and draconian gas rationing (remember the "even-odd" license plate system?) nearly destroyed new automobile sales, a crushing burden for a father employed as a "commission only" car salesman.
NEWS
By Jerome Miller | September 15, 2011
A plethora of contemporary political phenomena that may otherwise seem only bizarre — the various "pledges" not to compromise, the rejection of Social Security as a Ponzi scheme, the denial of evolution and climate change — begin to make sense once one recognizes that the historical analogy used to describe the movement responsible for them is inaccurate. Don't think 1774, 1776 and the Boston Tea Party. Think 1832, 1860 and nullification. Historically, nullification meant the sheer refusal of a state government to accept and abide by national legislation — specifically, in 1832, a tariff law with which South Carolina was unwilling to comply.
NEWS
June 20, 1993
25 Years Ago (Week of June 9-15, 1968):* Nathaniel J. Gibson was named principal of Waterloo Middle School. Mr. Gibson would be the first black principal appointed in the county since the desegregation of the public schools.50 Years Ago (week of June 13-19, 1943):* Penalties were levied against a number of county residents for violation of wartime rationing restrictions. Several drivers were fined (in rationing coupons) for driving at excessive speeds and thereby making unwise use of rationed gasoline and tires.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
There's always a great temptation after a political tussle like last week's federal budget showdown to immediately declare a winner and a loser. House Republicans can claim victory by setting the budget-trimming agenda in Washington, while Senate Democrats can claim they successfully defended against an ideological assault on women's health, Head Start, public broadcasting and other popular programs. The reality is that both won, but only in the sense that they were saved from themselves.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
It probably came as no surprise to Chef Bryan Voltaggio that when Robert M. Parker Jr., the country's leading wine critic and a Baltimore County resident, came to dine at his VOLT restaurant in Frederick last November, he brought wine from his own cellar. Selections like a 1982 Cheval Blanc St.-Emilion (which retails for about $1,000, if you can find it) aren't usually available on restaurant wine lists. But when the influential Mr. Parker gushed over the quality of the 21-course meal that ranged from goat cheese ravioli to squab with Brussels sprouts in his newsletter, "Hedonist's Gazette," this spring, it was Mr. Voltaggio who almost got stuck with the bill.
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