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Ratings System

NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 1994
The SAT score of the average U.S. high school student will soon be going up 100 points. But that doesn't mean that anyone is getting smarter.Beginning in April 1995, the College Board, based in Manhattan, will be recalibrating its scoring of the SAT. The bottom score will still be 200 and the top 800, but it will be easier for everyone to get higher scores.A 430 score on the verbal section of the SAT will suddenly become a 510 under the new scoring method. A 730 verbal score will become an 800.lTCCollege Board officials know they are opening themselves up to criticism.
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NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
Nursing homes will get a "star rating" from the federal government to help consumers pick the best facilities, a sweeping initiative that a Maryland regulator predicted will create "peer pressure" among owners to improve care. The ratings, from a low of one star to a high of five, will be posted starting in December on the Nursing Home Compare Web site of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said the federal agency's acting administrator, Kerry Weems. "I don't think we'll see very many people who are going to be anxious to put a loved one into a one-star home," Weems told reporters yesterday during a conference call.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Trying to provide a more accurate picture of school capacity to the decision-makers who manage residential development, Carroll school board members met yesterday with county and municipal leaders to unveil a proposed policy to provide more timely and more analyzed information on whether a school can accommodate additional children. "Our view is that the Board of Education is not the one responsible for managing growth," school board member Thomas G. Hiltz said. "You are the ones principally responsible for managing growth.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
For years, parents at older schools in poorer areas hav complained that the Harford school system ignores their pleas for long-overdue repairs and renovations.Now, stung by intense criticism, the school system has made public a 30-point rating system used to decide which schools are renovated when.The rating system evaluates older schools, using a point system to measure the need for repairs of everything from plumbing to the school's parking lot. Necessary repairs to some major parts of a school, like the heating and cooling system, receive more points than others, such as windows or floor tiles.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Most people probably wouldn't pay almost $9,000 more for a product than they had to. But that is, in effect, what 138 patients did last year when they went to Prince George's Hospital Center for an angioplasty.2Hospital ... ... ... Cases ... ... Avg. billUM ... ... ... .. ... ... 248 .. .. ... $14,197Adventist ... ... ... ... 186 ... .. .. 11,502Bayview ... ... .. .. ... 203 ... .. .. 10,502P.G. ... ... ... .. .. .. 218 ... .. .. 10,197Md. General ... ... .. .. 134 ... .. .. 9,708Bon Secours ... ... .. .. 191 ... .. .. 9,641Liberty ... ... ... .. .. 162 ... .. .. 9,452Hopkins ... ... ... .. .. 213 ... .. .. 9,315Harbor ... ... ... ... .. 181 ... .. .. 9,097Mercy ... ... ... ... ... 164 ... .. .. 8,891Holy Cross .. ... ... ... 320 ... .. .. 8,874N.
NEWS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 25, 1993
REDWOOD CITY, Calif. -- An inner-city gang, rampaging through the streets, comes upon some unsuspecting bystanders and proceeds to crush some heads.The scene isn't from urban America. It's from "Streets of Rage," a video game made by Sega of America, the Japanese company's U.S. unit.Amid concern about this type of video-game violence, Sega said yesterday it would initiate a rating system for its video games similar to the one used by Hollywood."We are particularly concerned that parents buy games appropriate for their children's age," said Tom Kalinske, Sega of America's chief executive.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the state's largest health insurer, is pressing hospitals to accept a new payment system in which they would be paid a flat rate for each type of case.CareFirst says the system will save money for its subscribers and promote efficient care, but the Maryland Hospital Association complains that CareFirst is simply using its muscle to force a rate cut.The insurer wrote to hospitals last week, briefly explaining the new system, and began meeting with hospitals this week to provide fuller explanation and to propose new rates.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | June 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to stave off a federally imposed system of ratings for violence on television, the nation's four broadcast networks have agreed to provide a warning to parents just before shows laden with mayhem are shown.The warning would also be made available to newspapers and magazines that publish television listings, allowing them to establish what would amount to a special coding for violent shows.The agreement, which will be announced by top officials of ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox in Washington today and could take effect during the next programming season, comes amid a growing outcry in Congress about the depiction of violence in entertainment programming and its possible harmful effects on some viewers.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 7, 1999
How nice, exactly, is that hotel you're considering for your summer splurge?You can ask your travel agent, tour operator or even the hotel reservations agents -- it can't hurt -- and you can consult a guidebook from AAA or Mobil. But whether the answer comes back in stars, diamonds or authoritative-sounding adjectives, many hotel rating systems can leave your curiosity unsatisfied. Or, even worse, some make a place sound better than it is.Here's a quick guide to some of this country's most widely used hotel rating systems.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
There is little doubt that an informed consumer makes better choices. That's why pharmaceuticals should include information about side effects and drug interactions, why food should carry nutrition labels and why potentially dangerous products carry warnings. Public education has gotten much better about informing taxpayers about its product, too. At the touch of a few buttons, Maryland parents can find out how their child's school performed in standardized tests this year and other years, how much their school system is spending on a per-pupil basis and how many are dropping out or graduating in any given year.
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