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By Thomas V. DiBacco | August 25, 1995
TOMORROW IS the 75th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment providing for woman suffrage. It's certainly a time for celebration. But the story of the drive to obtain this basic right is scarcely ennobling -- including the final act, the antics of the state legislature that put the amendment into effect.In fact, the amendment, first introduced in December 1868, witnessed so many setbacks that prudent observers would have given little likelihood of its ultimate ratification.The initial congressional effort died quickly.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The union representing 14,500 East Coast and Gulf longshoremen and the representative of 43 port operators and shipping companies completed negotiations on a six-year deal, a federal mediator announced Wednesday afternoon. The terms of the Master Agreement will now go to the respective memberships of the International Longshoremen's Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance for ratification, said George Cohen, director of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The Port of Baltimore has about 1,200 dockworkers represented by four locals.
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FEATURES
September 25, 2006
Sept. 25 1789 Congress adopted 12 amendments to the Con- stitution and sent them to the states for ratification. (Ten became the Bill of Rights.)
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Dock workers and the management of 15 East Coast and Gulf ports reached a tentative agreement on a new master contract late Friday night, averting a threatened walkout on Wednesday. The six-year deal between the International Longshoremen's Association, which represents 14,500 workers, and the U.S. Maritime Alliance, which negotiates for ports and shipping companies, is still subject to ratification by both sides and to agreements between local unions and port managers. Details were not released.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 8, 1992
George went to inspect L.A. It must have been serious.Is a constitutional state ratification from 1789 still valid? The Supreme Court justices who will eventually decide that one probably are not born yet.This Ross Perot fellow is getting to be more fun than a barrel of Democrats.Wuxtry! Wuxtry! Ollie supports Alan, denounces jackals of press! Wead all about it!
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Equal Rights Amendment lingers on, its pulse faint but its supporters determined. Their slender hopes arise from recent disrespect for the amending process.First introduced in Congress in 1923, the ERA says: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex."In 1971, the year before Title IX prohibited sexual discrimination in education, the Supreme Court for the first time cited the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment to invalidate a law on the grounds that it involved discrimination on the basis of sex.Despite this evidence that the ERA might be a legal redundancy (ERA supporters said it was needed to "put women into the Constitution")
NEWS
May 23, 1993
Ratification of the Treaty of Maastricht by Danish voters on their second attempt insures only that they are not the reason the rest of Europe may fail to attain a single currency by century's end.Denmark and Britain, where the House of Commons also approved the treaty last week, won the right to opt out of the central feature of the Maastricht pact, monetary union. So the principal issue before them was whether they would be spoilsports in preventing the rest of Europe from going forward, where unanimous ratification was required.
NEWS
May 18, 1993
Democracy is not, usually, a system where the leaders tell the people to vote and after the people vote wrong, give them a second choice with instructions to get it right this time. But Denmark's referendum today on ratification of the Treaty of Maastricht, after the paper-thin rejection a year ago, amounts to just that.The treaty, creating a European Community currency by century's end, requires unanimous ratification by the 12 EC members. So when the 4 million Danish voters couldn't quite ratify, such great powers as Germany, France, Italy and Britain were denied what they had negotiated.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 1992
PARIS -- Clearly chastened by the closeness of France's vote Sunday to approve a treaty on European Community union, Western Europe's leading governments tried yesterday to revive the region's flagging unity drive by pledging to pay greater attention to the concerns of ordinary citizens.Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany and President Francois Mitterrand of France agreed to meet in Paris today to discuss ways of making the European Community more answerable to public opinion. Prime Minister John Major of Britain said the French vote reflected widely held fears of loss of national identity.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 17, 1999
MOSCOW -- Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov, hoping to smooth U.S.-Russian relations in advance of a critical trip to Washington next week, intensified efforts yesterday to win ratification of the stalled START II missile treaty.The Communist-dominated Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, opened the way Monday to renewed debate on the treaty but set no timetable. In a prime-time television interview, Primakov said ratification of the pact is essential to Russia's long-range security and relations with other countries.
NEWS
By Daniel Erchick | July 31, 2012
On July 26, 1990, when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on the lawn of the White House, I was too young be in attendance, or even understand the impact that this monumental law would have on the United States by protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. People like me. About two weeks ago, an email popped into my inbox explaining that the Senate had scheduled a hearing to discuss U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
NEWS
November 17, 2010
By a nearly 2 to 1 margin, Baltimore teachers ratified a landmark union contract Wednesday that thrusts the city to the forefront of nationwide school reform efforts. After rejecting a similar proposal last month, teachers came out for a second vote to accept the agreement after union leaders and the city revised the document to reflect educators' concerns about evaluations and pay-for-performance provisions they said hadn't been clearly spelled out in the previous version. The contract will replace the longtime system linking teacher pay to years of employment and advanced degrees with one that rewards classroom effectiveness and growth in student achievement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
Baltimore teachers began voting Wednesday on what is being hailed as one of the most progressive union contracts to emerge in the nation, which, if ratified, would give teachers unprecedented pay and autonomy and tie raises to proven effectiveness in the classroom. Hundreds of the union's approximately 6,500 teachers participated in early voting at the Baltimore Teachers Union headquarters Wednesday evening, shaping up for what union officials anticipate will be a near-record turnout for the ratification vote.
FEATURES
September 25, 2006
Sept. 25 1789 Congress adopted 12 amendments to the Con- stitution and sent them to the states for ratification. (Ten became the Bill of Rights.)
NEWS
By RICHARD BOUDREAUX, LOUISE ROUG, DOUG SMITH AND P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, LOUISE ROUG, DOUG SMITH AND P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 26, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Fatalities among Americans serving in the Iraq war have reached 2,000, the U.S. military reported yesterday as it announced the death of a soldier who had been wounded days ago by a roadside bomb north of Baghdad. Staff Sgt. George T. Alexander Jr., 34, of Killeen, Texas, was injured Oct. 17 when a bomb planted by insurgents exploded near his Bradley Fighting Vehicle in the town of Samarra, the Pentagon said. He died Saturday at Brooke Army Hospital in San Antonio. His death reflected two threats to the 140,000 U.S. soldiers stationed in Iraq - the growing number of fatalities caused by hidden bombs and the capacity of insurgents to re-enter areas swept by U.S. offensives.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
Characterizing the months-long negotiations as "long and laborious" as well as "collaborative," the Howard County Board of Education and the Howard County Education Association have reached a tentative two-year contract agreement that would increase teacher salaries. Teachers would receive raises of 3 percent the first year and 3.5 percent the next. Many teachers also would be eligible for step increases - raises based on experience. School and union officials said yesterday at a news conference at the Board of Education building that salary increases were necessary to keep the state's top-performing school system competitive in the job market.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | February 14, 1994
Washington. -- Were Madison alive he would die o embarrassment about what his state is considering doing to his Constitution.In Richmond and some other state capitals, women's groups are attempting to resuscitate the Equal Rights Amendment. A Virginia legislative committee has refused summarily to dismiss, with the derision it deserves, the pretense that the ERA is still alive and can be ratified. The committee will consider the matter next year. By then perhaps the legislators will have refreshed their memories regarding the ERA and constitutional values.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 1, 2004
MOSCOW - The Russian Cabinet approved ratification of the Kyoto Protocol yesterday, a decisive step that effectively sets the stage for worldwide enactment of the landmark accord on global warming after years of diplomatic wrangling. The accord, reached in 1997 after two years of talks, calls for industrialized nations to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases linked to global warming. Proponents still need backing from Russia's parliament, both chambers of which are controlled by loyalists to President Vladimir V. Putin, who are expected to fall in line with yesterday's decision.
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