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By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
A TEEN-AGED Bill Ratchford was in the Senate gallery in 1947 when the General Assembly adopted Gov. William Preston Lane's controversial 2-cent sales tax proposal -- Maryland's first sales tax."That has stayed with me all these years," Ratchford said.Pub Date: 5/07/96
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NEWS
June 22, 2000
In Baltimore City Brother found guilty of murder in three killings Two Baltimore brothers have been convicted of murdering three Park Heights residents after a fight about a girlfriend of one of the defendants, city prosecutors said yesterday. Donnell and Tony Ratchford, both of the 3500 block of Derby Manor Drive, were found guilty in the stabbing deaths in the 4600 block of Park Heights Ave., according to the office of Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy. Their first trial ended with a hung jury in May last year.
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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
A 36-year-old Baltimore man was charged yesterday in connection with a triple slaying last month in a Park Heights Avenue rowhouse, police said.Donnell Ratchford was arrested about 7: 30 a.m. at his home in the 4500 block of Derby Manor Drive, said Detective Darryl Massey of the Baltimore police homicide unit.Ratchford was charged with three counts of first-degree murder, Massey said, and was being held last night at the Central Booking and Intake Center.Massey would not say what led investigators to Ratchford and would not comment on whether police have other suspects in the case.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 9, 1997
The World Trade Center will remain closed to all but essential personnel today because elevator service is limited and it lacks heat , Maryland Port Administration officials said.A small electrical fire Friday on the 28th floor of the 30-story Inner Harbor building prompted the evacuation of about 70 tenants, their employees and visitors, MPA officials said.Anyone with questions can call 410-633-1066, a 24-hour hot line established by MPA. Agency officials will decide today whether the building will reopen tommorow.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
After sending 60,000 state workers into a panic last week, Gov. William Donald Schaefer finally heeded the calming advice of legislative leaders and reversed his earlier decision to fire 1,800 state workers to help close a $423 million budget gap. The governor accepted a long list of alternatives that the legislature's top fiscal analyst came up with that would avoid layoffs and allow for a gradual downsizing of government through attrition.Why didn't Mr. Schaefer take that route earlier?
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly's chief budget adviser warned yesterday that the revenue estimates on which Gov. William Donald Schaefer is basing next year's state budget may now be too high by $75 million to $100 million or more.William S. Ratchford II, director of the Department of Fiscal Services, said the economic effect of war abroad combined with a deepeningrecession at home were not anticipated when the state's Board of Revenue Estimates delivered its official revenue projections in December.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 21, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- A dispute between Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the legislature's auditing staff has apparently been resolved by the state attorney general.A 12-page opinion handed down by J. Joseph Curran Jr. states that the auditors should not have to submit written questions in advance, as suggested by Governor Schaefer. The proposal was vehemently opposed by auditors and legislators.The attorney general did outline some general restrictions under which audits should be conducted. They included giving agencies advance notice of what records auditors wanted to review.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
Baltimore police arrested a second suspect yesterday in the triple slaying last month at a Park Heights Avenue rowhouse -- the brother of a man in custody in the stabbings.Tony Ratchford, 35, of the 4500 block of Derby Manor Drive was charged with three counts of first-degree murder. He was questioned yesterday afternoon by homicide detectives before he was taken to the Central Booking and Intake Center.The Sept. 27 slayings at the two-story rowhouse were particularly brutal, police said.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly's chief financial adviser put the highest-yet estimate yesterday on the budget deficit Maryland should expect at the end of this fiscal year -- predicting a shortfall almost $70 million greater than the Schaefer administration's last forecast.William S. Ratchford II, director of the legislature's Department of Fiscal Services, said the budget deficit next summer will be at least $69 million higher than the $180 million last forecast by the administration.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Over the past three weeks, Maryland's projected budget deficit grew from $249 million to $322 million, the General Assembly's chief budget adviser told a special legislative panel yesterday.William S. Ratchford II, director of the Department of Fiscal Services, attributed the bad news to higher oil prices and the flagging national economy.His revised estimate for fiscal year 1991, the current budget year, is $142 million higher than the $180 million figure Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget advisers say they are using in preparing their fiscal year 1992 budget.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
Baltimore police arrested a second suspect yesterday in the triple slaying last month at a Park Heights Avenue rowhouse -- the brother of a man in custody in the stabbings.Tony Ratchford, 35, of the 4500 block of Derby Manor Drive was charged with three counts of first-degree murder. He was questioned yesterday afternoon by homicide detectives before he was taken to the Central Booking and Intake Center.The Sept. 27 slayings at the two-story rowhouse were particularly brutal, police said.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
A 36-year-old Baltimore man was charged yesterday in connection with a triple slaying last month in a Park Heights Avenue rowhouse, police said.Donnell Ratchford was arrested about 7: 30 a.m. at his home in the 4500 block of Derby Manor Drive, said Detective Darryl Massey of the Baltimore police homicide unit.Ratchford was charged with three counts of first-degree murder, Massey said, and was being held last night at the Central Booking and Intake Center.Massey would not say what led investigators to Ratchford and would not comment on whether police have other suspects in the case.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
A TEEN-AGED Bill Ratchford was in the Senate gallery in 1947 when the General Assembly adopted Gov. William Preston Lane's controversial 2-cent sales tax proposal -- Maryland's first sales tax."That has stayed with me all these years," Ratchford said.Pub Date: 5/07/96
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | May 5, 1996
JANET AND RATCH are retiring -- and political Annapolis will never be the same. When it comes to crunching numbers and explaining what they mean, they have no peers.Janet L. Hoffman established herself as the Einstein of government lobbyists, the fiscal wizard for Baltimore, whose political and financial savvy was the envy of the State House. Her influence was immense. Governors plotted strategy with her help, legislators far removed from Baltimore turned to her for guidance.William S. Ratchford II held sway as the legislature's Information Man, the repository of all knowledge on complex fiscal formulas and the analyst best positioned to offer guidance on tax and spending bills.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
The lottery serves now as the biggest and most precariously balanced fig leaf in Maryland political life.What it tries to cover is the unwillingness of politicians to pay for government in a straightforward way. What it shows is politicians at work, trying to have it both ways. They swear they dislike gambling. But not as much as they despise taxes or cutting government programs.Now, though, declining lottery revenue could make this contradictory position even more difficult to defend.Clever politicians should have known it would come to this.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 21, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- A dispute between Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the legislature's auditing staff has apparently been resolved by the state attorney general.A 12-page opinion handed down by J. Joseph Curran Jr. states that the auditors should not have to submit written questions in advance, as suggested by Governor Schaefer. The proposal was vehemently opposed by auditors and legislators.The attorney general did outline some general restrictions under which audits should be conducted. They included giving agencies advance notice of what records auditors wanted to review.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
William S. Ratchford II, the General Assembly's budget adviser, has estimated the state's projected budget deficit at $322 million, an increase of $72 million above his projection earlier this month.Although Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget experts have called his earlier estimates too pessimistic, Ratchford, director of the Department of Fiscal Services, said yesterday the numbers may not have been gloomy enough."It strikes me that the risk of being pessimistic is somewhat less than being optimistic," Ratchford told the Spending Affordability Committee, a joint panel of House and Senate lawmakers.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | May 5, 1996
JANET AND RATCH are retiring -- and political Annapolis will never be the same. When it comes to crunching numbers and explaining what they mean, they have no peers.Janet L. Hoffman established herself as the Einstein of government lobbyists, the fiscal wizard for Baltimore, whose political and financial savvy was the envy of the State House. Her influence was immense. Governors plotted strategy with her help, legislators far removed from Baltimore turned to her for guidance.William S. Ratchford II held sway as the legislature's Information Man, the repository of all knowledge on complex fiscal formulas and the analyst best positioned to offer guidance on tax and spending bills.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly's chief budget adviser warned yesterday that the revenue estimates on which Gov. William Donald Schaefer is basing next year's state budget may now be too high by $75 million to $100 million or more.William S. Ratchford II, director of the Department of Fiscal Services, said the economic effect of war abroad combined with a deepeningrecession at home were not anticipated when the state's Board of Revenue Estimates delivered its official revenue projections in December.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
After sending 60,000 state workers into a panic last week, Gov. William Donald Schaefer finally heeded the calming advice of legislative leaders and reversed his earlier decision to fire 1,800 state workers to help close a $423 million budget gap. The governor accepted a long list of alternatives that the legislature's top fiscal analyst came up with that would avoid layoffs and allow for a gradual downsizing of government through attrition.Why didn't Mr. Schaefer take that route earlier?
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