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By ANTERO PIETILA | September 26, 1992
Parkton -- -- At the age of 48, after more than two decades living and working in Baltimore's inner city, artist James W. Voshell is starting over again.''I have relocated my entire studio and moved out of the city of Baltimore,'' he says in letters his patrons and friends are receiving these days. ''I am now living on a farm in Parkton, Maryland, with a special lady, Lynne, and her daughter Julie. I will no longer be painting the inner-city subject matter.''I now plan to explore and focus on our natural environment and man's relationship with such.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 12, 2004
IF THIS IS Thursday, Philadelphia Eagles receiver Terrell Owens is probably making an ass of himself somewhere. The past couple of days, he's been trying to wriggle out of the controversy he created when he hinted in a soon-to-be published Playboy magazine interview that former teammate and current Cleveland Browns quarterback Jeff Garcia is gay. I'm guessing it will be easier for T.O. (which also is NFL shorthand for timeout, turnover and totally obnoxious)...
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | August 10, 1997
25 years agoThe Taneytown Council took no action Monday on complaints about "nickel meters." Mayor Powell read off a sample of adverse public comment, most of them from businessmen: "They're destroying the impulse business." Prospective buyers are "driving through and won't stop." It is "driving people out of town." Commenting on these complaints, one city father commented, "People give me a pain where a pill won't reach." The council generally agreed that "this always happens when there's a change."
NEWS
By David Grimes | November 18, 1997
TIRED OF turkey? Looking for something a little different to serve up this Thanksgiving?How about a 12-pound water rat that culinary experts say tastes somewhat like a beaver, is less greasy than a 'coon but is not quite as good as possum?Hold the green bean casserole, ma, I'm comin' home!America's latest taste treat is called nutria and comes to us courtesy of the good citizens of Louisiana, who, apparently, will eat almost anything.The decision to market nutria as a food source is not due to its wonderful taste (the smell of cooking nutria has been compared to that of Sarin gas)
FEATURES
September 22, 1999
"I liked 'Fourth Grade Rats' by Jerry Spinelli a lot. The book is about a boy named Suds who wished he was still in the third grade, but his friend Joey wanted to be a fourth grade rat. This was the next step to becoming a man. Being a rat meant not being afraid of spiders, pushing little kids around and not crying anymore. By the end of the story the boys learned that just being themselves was more like being a man."-- Cassandra BurtonClear Spring Elementary"If you like adventure, read the 'Magic Treehouse' series by Mary Pope Osborne.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 13, 1997
Joey Amalfitano reports: "Baltimore yet lives, Danny boy! I saw a man sitting on his white marble stoop on Fleet Street in Highlandtown the other day, and he was actually drinking a National Boh. And then a few minutes later, I heard a guy on the No. 10 bus talking about Davey Johnson's strategy in the 'World Serious.' I swear ta gaahd!" . . . Jackie Watts, editor of the East Baltimore Guide, passed along a news release from the Maryland Army National Guard that refers to Oldham Street as "Oldhon" Street.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1999
"WHATEVER YOU do, choose wisely and have the best intentions in mind. Be considerate of others and live life to the fullest" is the advice Joann Wheatley offered to her fellow graduates during Liberty High School's commencement exercises Sunday afternoon at Western Maryland College, where she was one of two student speakers.A series of books popular with middle school students was the inspiration for her address. "Choose Your Own Adventure" was her advice as she reflected on the choices one makes in life and the paths where those choices lead.
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Who will survive? Should we care? Outdoors experts and show fans alike talk about what makes "Survivor" a study of human nature or why we shouldn't try the participants' wilderness tricks at home. "Mountain" Mel Deweese, survivalist. On choosing "Survivor" participants: "They're like the seven dwarfs, Sleepy, Dopey and Grumpy put under stress without food, fire, water or shelter. They don't want 16 of us [survivalists]. We would've whacked the monkeys the first day there and eaten them."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 24, 2006
It was the sighting of heirloom hydrangeas that knocked me into the realization that an old-fashioned Baltimore summer has arrived. Their hot blueberry and purple blossoms, which resemble the shades of snowball flavorings, remind me of canvas awnings and summer hotels. These hydrangeas are tough city survivors. They are tucked into the areaway of some old apartment houses near my home. They seem to thrive on utter inattention and soil conditions only a little removed from a clay pit. I can never recall their not being there; there is something comforting about the annual return of these June veterans.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 4, 1993
WITHIN a few days, the United States has become the first nation to orbit a veterinarian, to dissect a rat in space and to spend $2 billion on a hole in the ground that is now useless.If a scientist arrived from Mars and was told these feats were part of two of the most expensive research projects ever undertaken by humans, he'd imagine Earth was inhabited by idiots. Either that or, having met with human leaders, he'd politely ask to see the planet's more intelligent species.There were, of course, intelligent arguments why the United States should not have committed $11 billion to build a superconducting supercollider, most of them having to do with the amount of socially useful science that could have been purchased by a similar expenditure in other research where such a huge portion of the investment wouldn't be eaten up by the earth-moving budget, using technologies not all that far removed from the excavating methods of ancient Rome.
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