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NEWS
May 8, 2006
Suddenly, On May 6, 2006, WILLIAM N. "Rat" MENDENHALL; dearest son of Bill and Marge Barlage and William Mendenhall; beloved brother of Buddy and Mike Barlage, Cathy Neslein, and Lee Greenborn; loving god-father of Tiffany Mc Kee and best friend of Frank Hunt. Also survived by many other nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Family invite friends to call at the Charles S. Stevens Funeral Home, Inc., 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD, on Monday 2 to 4 P.M. and 6 to 8 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at the conclusion of the visitation on Monday evening at 8 P.M. Interment will be private.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 27, 1994
It was the long tail sticking out of the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. cookbook that triggered my mental alarm bell.I didn't really want to believe that a live rat had moved into my kitchen. It was easier not to admit it.The first signs of upheaval in the kitchen appeared Friday morning. I brushed it off as something that would just go away and went to work.Couldn't it have been a frolicsome squirrel that knocked over the stack of Tupperware bowls and messed up the cereal boxes. Of course.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | November 13, 1992
All right, "Sinatra," the CBS miniseries about Frank Sinatra, was awful. But even at its worst, it never had anything that could compare with scenes featuring Michael Jackson as a small child talking to a rat in "The Jacksons: An American Dream," an ABC miniseries about the Jackson family that begins Sunday."
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Newton's Third Law of Motion states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. That theorem can be applied to the misconduct of the Baltimore City police officer convicted of beating a suspect in custody ( "Baltimore officer jailed for assaulting suspect in break-in of girlfriend's home," April 16). A city police officer takes a suspect back inside a dwelling to "shake him down" (action). A Baltimore City police officer finds a symbolic dead rat on his patrol vehicle; the rat was a message from a fellow police officer about snitching on the cop who assaulted the suspect.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 12, 2004
IF THIS IS Thursday, Philadelphia Eagles receiver Terrell Owens is probably making an ass of himself somewhere. The past couple of days, he's been trying to wriggle out of the controversy he created when he hinted in a soon-to-be published Playboy magazine interview that former teammate and current Cleveland Browns quarterback Jeff Garcia is gay. I'm guessing it will be easier for T.O. (which also is NFL shorthand for timeout, turnover and totally obnoxious)...
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | August 10, 1997
25 years agoThe Taneytown Council took no action Monday on complaints about "nickel meters." Mayor Powell read off a sample of adverse public comment, most of them from businessmen: "They're destroying the impulse business." Prospective buyers are "driving through and won't stop." It is "driving people out of town." Commenting on these complaints, one city father commented, "People give me a pain where a pill won't reach." The council generally agreed that "this always happens when there's a change."
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1999
"WHATEVER YOU do, choose wisely and have the best intentions in mind. Be considerate of others and live life to the fullest" is the advice Joann Wheatley offered to her fellow graduates during Liberty High School's commencement exercises Sunday afternoon at Western Maryland College, where she was one of two student speakers.A series of books popular with middle school students was the inspiration for her address. "Choose Your Own Adventure" was her advice as she reflected on the choices one makes in life and the paths where those choices lead.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 24, 2006
It was the sighting of heirloom hydrangeas that knocked me into the realization that an old-fashioned Baltimore summer has arrived. Their hot blueberry and purple blossoms, which resemble the shades of snowball flavorings, remind me of canvas awnings and summer hotels. These hydrangeas are tough city survivors. They are tucked into the areaway of some old apartment houses near my home. They seem to thrive on utter inattention and soil conditions only a little removed from a clay pit. I can never recall their not being there; there is something comforting about the annual return of these June veterans.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 4, 1993
WITHIN a few days, the United States has become the first nation to orbit a veterinarian, to dissect a rat in space and to spend $2 billion on a hole in the ground that is now useless.If a scientist arrived from Mars and was told these feats were part of two of the most expensive research projects ever undertaken by humans, he'd imagine Earth was inhabited by idiots. Either that or, having met with human leaders, he'd politely ask to see the planet's more intelligent species.There were, of course, intelligent arguments why the United States should not have committed $11 billion to build a superconducting supercollider, most of them having to do with the amount of socially useful science that could have been purchased by a similar expenditure in other research where such a huge portion of the investment wouldn't be eaten up by the earth-moving budget, using technologies not all that far removed from the excavating methods of ancient Rome.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 24, 1992
Johns Hopkins Hospital is assembling a team of scientists that will work to perfect a kind of biological alchemy that has already succeeded in turning muscle tissue into bone.Experiments with manipulation of the body's own repair mechanisms suggest human beings may soon be able to generate their own skeletal replacement parts right inside their own bodies.Hip joints worn down by age or disease, facial bones damaged by accident or congenital deformity, and slow-healing fractures might all be repaired or replaced with the patient's own bone tissue, manufactured to precise specifications inside his own body.
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