Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRat
IN THE NEWS

Rat

FEATURES
September 22, 1999
"I liked 'Fourth Grade Rats' by Jerry Spinelli a lot. The book is about a boy named Suds who wished he was still in the third grade, but his friend Joey wanted to be a fourth grade rat. This was the next step to becoming a man. Being a rat meant not being afraid of spiders, pushing little kids around and not crying anymore. By the end of the story the boys learned that just being themselves was more like being a man."-- Cassandra BurtonClear Spring Elementary"If you like adventure, read the 'Magic Treehouse' series by Mary Pope Osborne.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 3, 1993
At the risk of whipping the reader into a jealous rage, this is about a recent visit to the Maryland State Fair where I saw -- here's the good part -- Tiny Tim, billed as the "World's Smallest Horse!"Oh, he was something to see, all right, a tiny palomino that stood just . . . well, there was one problem.The problem was that after paying your buck to see him, you found out that instead of being 10 inches tall as advertised, the stupid horse was about three feet tall -- only he was standing in a pit to make him look shorter.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 13, 1997
Joey Amalfitano reports: "Baltimore yet lives, Danny boy! I saw a man sitting on his white marble stoop on Fleet Street in Highlandtown the other day, and he was actually drinking a National Boh. And then a few minutes later, I heard a guy on the No. 10 bus talking about Davey Johnson's strategy in the 'World Serious.' I swear ta gaahd!" . . . Jackie Watts, editor of the East Baltimore Guide, passed along a news release from the Maryland Army National Guard that refers to Oldham Street as "Oldhon" Street.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1999
"WHATEVER YOU do, choose wisely and have the best intentions in mind. Be considerate of others and live life to the fullest" is the advice Joann Wheatley offered to her fellow graduates during Liberty High School's commencement exercises Sunday afternoon at Western Maryland College, where she was one of two student speakers.A series of books popular with middle school students was the inspiration for her address. "Choose Your Own Adventure" was her advice as she reflected on the choices one makes in life and the paths where those choices lead.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
The tenants' council and residents of two high-rises at the Lexington Terrace public housing complex voted to withhold their rents from the city Housing Authority beginning Feb. 1 to protest unsafe and unsanitary living conditions.The residents also invited City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Housing Authority Executive Director Robert W. Hearn to spend a night in the crime-plagued and rat-infested West Baltimore development and "wake up the same way we do."Ms.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 24, 2006
It was the sighting of heirloom hydrangeas that knocked me into the realization that an old-fashioned Baltimore summer has arrived. Their hot blueberry and purple blossoms, which resemble the shades of snowball flavorings, remind me of canvas awnings and summer hotels. These hydrangeas are tough city survivors. They are tucked into the areaway of some old apartment houses near my home. They seem to thrive on utter inattention and soil conditions only a little removed from a clay pit. I can never recall their not being there; there is something comforting about the annual return of these June veterans.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 4, 1993
WITHIN a few days, the United States has become the first nation to orbit a veterinarian, to dissect a rat in space and to spend $2 billion on a hole in the ground that is now useless.If a scientist arrived from Mars and was told these feats were part of two of the most expensive research projects ever undertaken by humans, he'd imagine Earth was inhabited by idiots. Either that or, having met with human leaders, he'd politely ask to see the planet's more intelligent species.There were, of course, intelligent arguments why the United States should not have committed $11 billion to build a superconducting supercollider, most of them having to do with the amount of socially useful science that could have been purchased by a similar expenditure in other research where such a huge portion of the investment wouldn't be eaten up by the earth-moving budget, using technologies not all that far removed from the excavating methods of ancient Rome.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 24, 1992
Johns Hopkins Hospital is assembling a team of scientists that will work to perfect a kind of biological alchemy that has already succeeded in turning muscle tissue into bone.Experiments with manipulation of the body's own repair mechanisms suggest human beings may soon be able to generate their own skeletal replacement parts right inside their own bodies.Hip joints worn down by age or disease, facial bones damaged by accident or congenital deformity, and slow-healing fractures might all be repaired or replaced with the patient's own bone tissue, manufactured to precise specifications inside his own body.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | March 7, 1992
To most dogs, there's little difference between a feral rat, a squirrel and a guinea pig.A rat is Prey, pure and simple. A squirrel is Prey With Fuzzy Tail. A guinea pig is Prey, No Tail, Extra Plump (mmmmm!).It doesn't matter much that we think of the same animals a little differently -- as Disgusting Vermin, Cute Little Wild Creature and Fuzzy Pet With Shoebutton Eyes and Twitching Nose. Every fiber of a dog's being tells him that these are all pretty much the same thing -- lunch.Knowing this, I wasn't really surprised at my younger dog Andy's reaction to the temporary addition of Geepers, a black-and-white guinea pig, to the household menagerie.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | August 12, 2000
A friend took a deep breath the other day and remarked, "It smells like August." I'd never thought the eighth month of the year had its own perfume, but he was so right. Anything green that grows is now peaking. Weeds are in ecstasy. The corn is toppling over. There's a lush bushiness that translates into the musty, damp odor of a ripe compost heap. Ah, August. Another friend, who walked through my backyard flower garden, complained it was too full - that it had too many black-eyed Susans, too many zinnias.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.