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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 17, 2001
It's apt that the opening credits for Rat Race present pictures of the cast as a cross between marionettes and cardboard cut-outs, since the movie features slapstick on the Punch-and-Judy level. You lose count of the bonked heads and not-so-funny faces, even, in one scene, of the number of times a body gets slammed against cows. The funniest bit comes with the final credit announcing that only humans, not animals, were harmed in making this film. I hope that doesn't refer to the actors' reputations.
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BUSINESS
By JANET STEWART KIDD | February 8, 2004
WALL Streeters call it their "walk-away" money. Well, they actually call it something you can't print in a newspaper, but it means the same: How much money would it take for you to leave the rat race? Not that you would necessarily quit. But imagine hitting the magic number that makes you bolder and more at peace - maybe even better at your job. For Robert Safro, the number is $2 million in addition to his retirement accounts. "That's the figure that I want in liquid assets that would allow me to turn over some clients and reduce my workload," said the 48-year-old Bethesda entrepreneur who sells promotional products for fund-raising events.
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BUSINESS
By JANET STEWART KIDD | February 8, 2004
WALL Streeters call it their "walk-away" money. Well, they actually call it something you can't print in a newspaper, but it means the same: How much money would it take for you to leave the rat race? Not that you would necessarily quit. But imagine hitting the magic number that makes you bolder and more at peace - maybe even better at your job. For Robert Safro, the number is $2 million in addition to his retirement accounts. "That's the figure that I want in liquid assets that would allow me to turn over some clients and reduce my workload," said the 48-year-old Bethesda entrepreneur who sells promotional products for fund-raising events.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A big year for lacrosse in Baltimore begins to snowball this weekend, as more than 3,000 coaches are in town for the US Lacrosse National Convention. The men's college season will conclude Memorial Day weekend at Ravens Stadium, where crowds approaching 40,000 will highlight the game's expanding popularity. Its growth has been accompanied by some of the same excesses that led the NCAA to clamp down on major sports, however, and the lacrosse rat race is becoming just as frantic as football and basketball.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1999
If you want to know if Mount Airy is growing, just go to church.On one Sunday in September, The Rev. Arthur Lillicropp said he welcomed 22 new people to his parish, St. James Episcopal Church on Main Street.Lillicropp also tells about the four baptisms he presided over on that September day and the five that he did the following Sunday.St. James is a good indicators of what's happening in Mount Airy. Of those 22 new church members who have moved to this little town at the junction of Carroll, Frederick, Howard and Montgomery counties, some were from out of state, but most came from the Baltimore-Washington corridor, according to Lillicropp.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 7, 2001
The drive to Onancock, Va., feels interminable -- mile after mile of highway along the pancake-flat lower Eastern Shore. I begin to wonder if it's worth the trip. But I stop wondering as I roll into town. Unlike some of the down-at-the-heels villages on the lower shore, Onancock looks prosperous. Market Street, the town's main drag, is lined with upscale cafes and restaurants, galleries and B&Bs. Perennial borders, herb gardens and overflowing planters grace homes and shops. I wander down the streets, aware that a stranger in this small, close-knit town of about 1,000 people stands out. But instead of curious stares, I get smiles of greeting from the natives and the non-natives, known as "come-here's."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A big year for lacrosse in Baltimore begins to snowball this weekend, as more than 3,000 coaches are in town for the US Lacrosse National Convention. The men's college season will conclude Memorial Day weekend at Ravens Stadium, where crowds approaching 40,000 will highlight the game's expanding popularity. Its growth has been accompanied by some of the same excesses that led the NCAA to clamp down on major sports, however, and the lacrosse rat race is becoming just as frantic as football and basketball.
FEATURES
By ERIKA D. PETERMAN and ERIKA D. PETERMAN,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
On a quiet Tuesday morning around 8, Lisa Dean grabs the "Chicken Little" storybook and settles onto the floor of the bathroom. Her audience is 2-year-old Elizabeth, who has voluntarily perched on the potty in her pink nightgown."
NEWS
September 10, 1993
Whenever the "breakdown" of American society comes up for discussion, the causes and effects often cited include drug abuse, crime, the dissolution of the family, violence and homelessness.For many citizens, these are problems they experience only indirectly, through reports they read in the newspapers or see on television. But if there is one troubling social trend of which most people can claim personal knowledge, it's the rude behavior of others -- from disdainful retail clerks to impatient, horn-blaring drivers to foul-mouthed teen-agers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2002
An American Rhapsody (Paramount, 2001) stars Tony Goldwyn and Nastassja Kinski as cultured Budapest parents who leave their infant daughter behind when they flee Stalinist Hungary in 1951 and aren't reunited with her until she is 6. By then, she has bonded indelibly with her Hungarian peasant guardians. Writer-director Eva Gardos is telling an autobiographical story, so you hope for the equivalent of a successful hypnosis - one that brings back, all at once, tactile details, psychological insights and the aura of a just-past era. Disappointingly, this picture provides little of that.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2002
He counts and carefully touches parking meters - each and every one - as he's running for his life. He interrupts his analysis of a murder scene with a room full of police officials listening because he's suddenly certain he forgot to turn off the stove back at his house. And he never leaves home without a fresh supply of sealed, anti-bacterial towelettes. This is Adrian Monk - American television's first obsessive-compulsive detective. Or, as one character in Monk, a new crime series premiering tonight on the USA cable channel, calls him, "the defective detective."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2002
An American Rhapsody (Paramount, 2001) stars Tony Goldwyn and Nastassja Kinski as cultured Budapest parents who leave their infant daughter behind when they flee Stalinist Hungary in 1951 and aren't reunited with her until she is 6. By then, she has bonded indelibly with her Hungarian peasant guardians. Writer-director Eva Gardos is telling an autobiographical story, so you hope for the equivalent of a successful hypnosis - one that brings back, all at once, tactile details, psychological insights and the aura of a just-past era. Disappointingly, this picture provides little of that.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 7, 2001
The drive to Onancock, Va., feels interminable -- mile after mile of highway along the pancake-flat lower Eastern Shore. I begin to wonder if it's worth the trip. But I stop wondering as I roll into town. Unlike some of the down-at-the-heels villages on the lower shore, Onancock looks prosperous. Market Street, the town's main drag, is lined with upscale cafes and restaurants, galleries and B&Bs. Perennial borders, herb gardens and overflowing planters grace homes and shops. I wander down the streets, aware that a stranger in this small, close-knit town of about 1,000 people stands out. But instead of curious stares, I get smiles of greeting from the natives and the non-natives, known as "come-here's."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 17, 2001
It's apt that the opening credits for Rat Race present pictures of the cast as a cross between marionettes and cardboard cut-outs, since the movie features slapstick on the Punch-and-Judy level. You lose count of the bonked heads and not-so-funny faces, even, in one scene, of the number of times a body gets slammed against cows. The funniest bit comes with the final credit announcing that only humans, not animals, were harmed in making this film. I hope that doesn't refer to the actors' reputations.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
Rivals in the sometimes acrimonious race to sequence the human genome are working together to unravel the genomic software powering the rat, an animal often used as a model to help understand disease in people, the National Institutes of Health announced yesterday. Celera Genomics Group, which recently published its human genome sequence in the journal Science, and the Baylor College of Medicine, a key sequencing center for the rival publicly funded project that published in Nature, have been awarded two new grants totaling $58.5 million to help sequence the rat. The awards, $21 million of which will go to Celera over the next two fiscal years, are meant to speed up a publicly funded rat DNA-sequencing project begun at the end of the 1999 fiscal year.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1999
If you want to know if Mount Airy is growing, just go to church.On one Sunday in September, The Rev. Arthur Lillicropp said he welcomed 22 new people to his parish, St. James Episcopal Church on Main Street.Lillicropp also tells about the four baptisms he presided over on that September day and the five that he did the following Sunday.St. James is a good indicators of what's happening in Mount Airy. Of those 22 new church members who have moved to this little town at the junction of Carroll, Frederick, Howard and Montgomery counties, some were from out of state, but most came from the Baltimore-Washington corridor, according to Lillicropp.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2002
He counts and carefully touches parking meters - each and every one - as he's running for his life. He interrupts his analysis of a murder scene with a room full of police officials listening because he's suddenly certain he forgot to turn off the stove back at his house. And he never leaves home without a fresh supply of sealed, anti-bacterial towelettes. This is Adrian Monk - American television's first obsessive-compulsive detective. Or, as one character in Monk, a new crime series premiering tonight on the USA cable channel, calls him, "the defective detective."
NEWS
June 19, 1998
Educational expenses drove stay-home mom back to the work forceI am writing in response to the recent letters to the editor concerning mothers who choose to work outside of the home. I am one of the many mothers who have chosen to return to a full-time career. The reasons that I have made such a choice are many, but none have anything to do with greed or the acquisition of material items, as has been implied.Many families with two working parents would be able to make sacrifices and survive if one parent were to stay at home; however, the one sacrifice we dare not make is that of our children's futures.
BUSINESS
By Joan Kasura and Joan Kasura,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1999
When you reach the yellow flashing traffic lights at the intersection of Route 20 and Rock Hall's Main Street, you have the choice of three directions to take. But, regardless of choice, the roads will lead to soothing water views.It is this end-of-the-road kind of solitude that is increasingly attracting larger numbers of both "weekenders" and permanent residents to Rock Hall, at the southernmost tip of Kent County -- Maryland's smallest county."If you have an income, it's a good place to drop out of the rat race," said Terry Smith, a local businessman, retired Army officer and 14-year resident of Rock Hall.
NEWS
June 19, 1998
Educational expenses drove stay-home mom back to the work forceI am writing in response to the recent letters to the editor concerning mothers who choose to work outside of the home. I am one of the many mothers who have chosen to return to a full-time career. The reasons that I have made such a choice are many, but none have anything to do with greed or the acquisition of material items, as has been implied.Many families with two working parents would be able to make sacrifices and survive if one parent were to stay at home; however, the one sacrifice we dare not make is that of our children's futures.
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