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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 22, 1998
"The Rat Pack" starts out all a-ring-a-ding-ding lingo and martini-retro chic of Las Vegas circa 1960. But once it sheds the superficial trappings of pop memory, this HBO film has some powerful stories to tell. The problem is, it picks the wrong one to feature.The tale director Rob Cohen wants most to tell is that of Frank Sinatra. After the 10 million overblown appreciations of Sinatra in May when he died, why go on about who he really was or wasn't?In this film, he is depicted as King Arthur of the Blackjack Table.
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The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
About 18 years ago, a group of guys began working out together every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Owings Mills Jewish Community Center. As the years have proceeded, the group has grown some and also lost some members, but the reasons its members meet remain constant: They do it to stay healthy, but also because The Rat Pack, as they're known, is about friendship and sharing life's good times and tough moments. Who they are: Bernie Cohen, whom other members say is the "CEO" of the group, is also the unofficial historian.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Eddie Griffin's near good riddance to television happened suddenly. Which could not have been soon enough, except for the searing pain in his chest and shortness of breath. At age 28, Griffin was having a heart attack. Make that had a heart attack. He was dead. Griffin would have done anything to leave Malcolm & Eddie, a by-the-numbers sitcom about two guys and a bar. Anything. Except dying. He was smoking three packs a day and inhaling fried chicken and pork-sauteed collard greens.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 15, 2009
Ordinary Joes trapped in upside-down mortgages, take heart: even a real smarty-pants like the ex-Hopkins president is taking a bath in the real estate market. Dr. William Brody bought a Federal Hill rowhouse two years ago as an off-campus get-away. His family trust paid $1.5 million. Now that Brody has retired from Hopkins and taken a job as president of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies out in California, the place is for sale. List price: $1.3 million. Brody has a doctorate in engineering and a medical degree.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Buddy Lester, 86, a comedian who appeared in 1960s "Rat Pack" movies and Jerry Lewis' The Nutty Professor, died of cancer Friday in Los Angeles. The Chicago-born stand-up became Frank Sinatra's opening act in Las Vegas and appeared with the Rat Pack -- Mr. Sinatra, Dean Martin, Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford -- in Ocean's 11 and Sergeants 3. The Rev. Paul M. Washington, 81, an Episcopal pastor and social crusader who fought for the acceptance of women...
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | November 12, 2006
Hollywood Station Joseph Wambaugh Everybody Kills Somebody Sometime Robert J. Randisi Thomas Dunne-St. Martin's Press / 272 pages / $23.95 What is it about the Rat Pack that still fascinates so many, more than 40 years after their heyday? Though the answer is still far from definitive, longtime mystery veteran Randisi does a bang-up job capturing Sinatra, Martin, Davis Jr. and their fellow Kings of Cool in all their Vegas glory. When Joey Bishop pays a visit to the Sands one night, it's not to ask about a potential gig, but to recruit pit boss Eddie Gianelli for a little side job. After twelve years, "Eddie G" may be jaded about what happens in his adopted hometown, but getting orders from Sinatra to find out who's been sending Dino anonymous threats nearly brings out the fanboy in him. But when Eddie's investigation, helped by PI pal Danny Bardini and other assorted Vegas lifers, leads him to mobster Lou Terazzo's door, the bodies start piling up - and being starstruck ends up the least of Eddie's worries.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 15, 2009
Ordinary Joes trapped in upside-down mortgages, take heart: even a real smarty-pants like the ex-Hopkins president is taking a bath in the real estate market. Dr. William Brody bought a Federal Hill rowhouse two years ago as an off-campus get-away. His family trust paid $1.5 million. Now that Brody has retired from Hopkins and taken a job as president of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies out in California, the place is for sale. List price: $1.3 million. Brody has a doctorate in engineering and a medical degree.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 16, 1998
He embodied our most wholesome ideals and our darkest impulses in one single, stylish glissando. Frank Sinatra, who started as what he off-handedly called a "saloon singer," surprised them all when he began a serious acting career: Like everything in show business to which he turned his prodigious talents, he succeeded at movies, too, at least some of the time.After making his feature film debut in 1941 with the Tommy Dorsey band in "Las Vegas Nights," Sinatra went on to make nearly 60 movies, which described an arc as paradoxical as the man himself.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
They're like a rat pack -- gnawing, swarming, unshakable. They make opposing offensive players want to scream in frustration.That's Mount Hebron's defense, the dominant reason the Vikings won their third straight regional championship yesterday.No. 4-ranked Mount Hebron (17-1) chewed up visiting Centennial, 14-4, in the Class 3A-4A West Region championship game, and will play Dulaney of Baltimore County in a state semifinal at 6 p.m. tomorrow at UMBC."We're aggressive," said Vikings defenseman Mike Machiran.
FEATURES
By Kirk S. Nevin and Kirk S. Nevin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
Home to a holy rat pack; A memorable placeRats - the four-legged, whiskery, gray kind - don't normally play a big part in our travel plans.The exception came on a hot, dusty day last winter when my wife, Susan, and I spent an afternoon at the Holy Rat Temple in Deshnok, Rajasthan, India.The guidebook description intrigued us. The Karni Mata temple is home to thousands of holy rats, which are believed to be reincarnations of people hiding from the wrath of Yama, the god of death. The rats live very well: three meals a day plus an evening dessert of sweetmeats and warm milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Power Plant Live's bars and clubs seem to have fairly short life spans. In the past several years, the downtown entertainment district has gone through a couple of comedy clubs and a handful of bars. The newest addition is Luckie's Tavern, which replaced the Lodge Bar, which replaced McFadden's, an Irish pub. Luckie's, which opened last month, is a far cry from the Lodge Bar. True to its name, the Lodge Bar had lots of wood and deer heads on the walls. It was an inviting spot but cluttered.
FEATURES
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2007
Joey Bishop, the deadpan comedian who was ABC's answer to NBC's late-night talk-show king Johnny Carson in the late 1960s and was the last surviving member of Frank Sinatra's legendary Rat Pack, has died. He was 89. Mr. Bishop, who had been in failing health for some time, died Wednesday night at his home in Newport Beach, Calif., according to his longtime friend, publicist Warren Cowan. An adept ad-libber with a dry, underplayed sense of humor, Mr. Bishop achieved his greatest fame in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | November 12, 2006
Hollywood Station Joseph Wambaugh Everybody Kills Somebody Sometime Robert J. Randisi Thomas Dunne-St. Martin's Press / 272 pages / $23.95 What is it about the Rat Pack that still fascinates so many, more than 40 years after their heyday? Though the answer is still far from definitive, longtime mystery veteran Randisi does a bang-up job capturing Sinatra, Martin, Davis Jr. and their fellow Kings of Cool in all their Vegas glory. When Joey Bishop pays a visit to the Sands one night, it's not to ask about a potential gig, but to recruit pit boss Eddie Gianelli for a little side job. After twelve years, "Eddie G" may be jaded about what happens in his adopted hometown, but getting orders from Sinatra to find out who's been sending Dino anonymous threats nearly brings out the fanboy in him. But when Eddie's investigation, helped by PI pal Danny Bardini and other assorted Vegas lifers, leads him to mobster Lou Terazzo's door, the bodies start piling up - and being starstruck ends up the least of Eddie's worries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Eddie Griffin's near good riddance to television happened suddenly. Which could not have been soon enough, except for the searing pain in his chest and shortness of breath. At age 28, Griffin was having a heart attack. Make that had a heart attack. He was dead. Griffin would have done anything to leave Malcolm & Eddie, a by-the-numbers sitcom about two guys and a bar. Anything. Except dying. He was smoking three packs a day and inhaling fried chicken and pork-sauteed collard greens.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Buddy Lester, 86, a comedian who appeared in 1960s "Rat Pack" movies and Jerry Lewis' The Nutty Professor, died of cancer Friday in Los Angeles. The Chicago-born stand-up became Frank Sinatra's opening act in Las Vegas and appeared with the Rat Pack -- Mr. Sinatra, Dean Martin, Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford -- in Ocean's 11 and Sergeants 3. The Rev. Paul M. Washington, 81, an Episcopal pastor and social crusader who fought for the acceptance of women...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 22, 1998
"The Rat Pack" starts out all a-ring-a-ding-ding lingo and martini-retro chic of Las Vegas circa 1960. But once it sheds the superficial trappings of pop memory, this HBO film has some powerful stories to tell. The problem is, it picks the wrong one to feature.The tale director Rob Cohen wants most to tell is that of Frank Sinatra. After the 10 million overblown appreciations of Sinatra in May when he died, why go on about who he really was or wasn't?In this film, he is depicted as King Arthur of the Blackjack Table.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
About 18 years ago, a group of guys began working out together every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Owings Mills Jewish Community Center. As the years have proceeded, the group has grown some and also lost some members, but the reasons its members meet remain constant: They do it to stay healthy, but also because The Rat Pack, as they're known, is about friendship and sharing life's good times and tough moments. Who they are: Bernie Cohen, whom other members say is the "CEO" of the group, is also the unofficial historian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Power Plant Live's bars and clubs seem to have fairly short life spans. In the past several years, the downtown entertainment district has gone through a couple of comedy clubs and a handful of bars. The newest addition is Luckie's Tavern, which replaced the Lodge Bar, which replaced McFadden's, an Irish pub. Luckie's, which opened last month, is a far cry from the Lodge Bar. True to its name, the Lodge Bar had lots of wood and deer heads on the walls. It was an inviting spot but cluttered.
FEATURES
By Kirk S. Nevin and Kirk S. Nevin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
Home to a holy rat pack; A memorable placeRats - the four-legged, whiskery, gray kind - don't normally play a big part in our travel plans.The exception came on a hot, dusty day last winter when my wife, Susan, and I spent an afternoon at the Holy Rat Temple in Deshnok, Rajasthan, India.The guidebook description intrigued us. The Karni Mata temple is home to thousands of holy rats, which are believed to be reincarnations of people hiding from the wrath of Yama, the god of death. The rats live very well: three meals a day plus an evening dessert of sweetmeats and warm milk.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 16, 1998
He embodied our most wholesome ideals and our darkest impulses in one single, stylish glissando. Frank Sinatra, who started as what he off-handedly called a "saloon singer," surprised them all when he began a serious acting career: Like everything in show business to which he turned his prodigious talents, he succeeded at movies, too, at least some of the time.After making his feature film debut in 1941 with the Tommy Dorsey band in "Las Vegas Nights," Sinatra went on to make nearly 60 movies, which described an arc as paradoxical as the man himself.
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