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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Question: How can I tell if the little furry animal I found in the basement is a baby mouse or a rat? Answer: Mouse ears are very large, relative to the body. Baby rat ears are small, relatively. Baby rat tails are thicker, whereas mouse tails are thinner. For a comparison chart with several more differences, photos, and a treasure trove of information, go to: www.ratbehavior.org/RatsMice.htm.
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By Randy O'Donnell and New Brunswick Telegraph Journal | September 9, 2014
The Saint John Mill Rats have signed play-making guard Aquille Carr to a one-year contract. Carr's agent, Daniel Hazan, confirmed in a phone interview that the contract has been signed and the paperwork sent to the Mill Rats Tuesday afternoon. “Very excited about the program that Aquille is going to be part of and the team as a whole. I think this is going to be great for the city, it's going to be great for the organization and it's going to be amazing for him,” Hazan said.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 30, 1991
Boston. -- When you make a living telling people what you think, you expect that people will write to tell you what they think of what you think. It's a fair enough exchange except that you're often outnumbered. Writer, 1; Readers, 101, that sort of thing.So it happened with a recent column in which I dissented from Judge Jackson Kiser's opinion upholding the all-male Virginia Military Institute. He said the state-supported school could legally ban women from its hallowed, Stonewall Jackson-haunted grounds.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Baltimore Police officer who became a prosecution witness against other officers convicted of misconduct is leaving the department amid an investigation of his own conduct, his attorney confirmed. Det. Joseph Crystal, who said he found a rat on the windshield of his car in November 2012 after he cooperated with prosecutors, is resigning because he continues "to feel uncomfortable and unsafe," according to his attorney, Nick Panteleakis.  The move also comes as he is being investigated for an off-duty car accident in Baltimore County involving a take-home department vehicle.
NEWS
By TRB | February 3, 1994
Washington.--"Most people don't give a rat's patootie'' about the Iran-Contra scandal, says Virginia Senate candidate Oliver North. I'm not sure what a patootie is, but I know a rat when I smell one. Does the Republican party?So far the party leadership has taken no position on the possibility that a proven and unapologetic lawbreaker might be the GOP's Senate nominee. Republican National Committee chairman Haley Barbour has been silent. A spokesman says the committee never expresses a preference in intra-party races.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | August 23, 1994
I GOT OUT of my cab in front of the Omni Hotel on Fayette Street and, without bothering to check in, headed straight for the bell stand. "Hey, fella," I said to the first bellman I saw, "Where's the best place to go rat fishing around here?"Bill Walters, the bellman, pondered for a moment, consulted a co-worker, and said, "Probably down on Redwood Street, after 10 at night when there aren't too many cars around. Lots of big ones there."His co-worker Ezana ("Call me Easy") Mengistad, disagreed.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 25, 1994
HILLSIDE, N.J. -- Frank Balun, the unassuming gardener who gained worldwide attention when he was hit with animal-cruelty charges for killing a rat that menaced his tomatoes, is off the hook.Last night, Hillside Prosecutor Chris Howard begged poetic license as he moved to dismiss the charges against Mr. Balun."For although a rat died and its death (was) unceremonial, we believe that at the end of a trial, Frank's action cannot be said to be criminal."To applause from 150 people in a packed municipal courtroom, Judge Albert Parsonnet agreed.
NEWS
By Susan Peterson and Susan Peterson,Orange County Register | November 9, 1990
IRVINE, Calif. -- Scientists at the University of California in Irvine have successfully transplanted the leg of one rat onto another rat without setting off an internal biological war.The experiment was performed without the use of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation normally required in transplants to prevent tissue rejection.The study has sparked a debate among immunologists, who are unsure whether it means that two immune systems worked simultaneously in the same animal, or what the results might mean for human transplants.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
Baltimore might benefit from a rat census, says a City Council resolution introduced last night by Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake. Three million of the reviled rodents could be burrowing in the city, but nobody knows, in part because no proper count has been done for 50 years, she said. "It never hurts for us to have updated information," she said at yesterday's weekly City Council lunch, held at the Wheelabrator Baltimore waste-to-energy complex near Westport, a plant that receives more than 21,000 tons of garbage daily.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
Ronald Cuffie chuckled at the thought of Baltimoreans lining up this weekend to see Ratatouille, the new animated film about a rat in Paris who's an expert chef. Surely some of the city's moviegoers are responsible for the 25,000 service requests made each year to the city's "Rat Rubout" program, which removes the repulsive vermin from infested neighborhoods. "In the movies, rats are likable characters," said Cuffie, director of the city's vector control initiative. "In real life, people want to drop a brick on them."
NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | July 10, 2014
Living in the city does not mean living without wildlife. We have plenty of it in Roland Park. The hills and green space, as well as the water at Stony Run and the Jones Falls, provide suitable habitat for many critters. On a recent cool evening, my husband and I sat outside eating dinner. Our table is less than 15 feet from the roaring interstate that is Cold Spring Lane. We noticed fireflies for the first time this season, blinking low over the grass. Nothing unusual about that, although they were a welcome sign of summer's arrival.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Newton's Third Law of Motion states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. That theorem can be applied to the misconduct of the Baltimore City police officer convicted of beating a suspect in custody ( "Baltimore officer jailed for assaulting suspect in break-in of girlfriend's home," April 16). A city police officer takes a suspect back inside a dwelling to "shake him down" (action). A Baltimore City police officer finds a symbolic dead rat on his patrol vehicle; the rat was a message from a fellow police officer about snitching on the cop who assaulted the suspect.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
It was a dead rat the detective found on his windshield of his Toyota Corolla on a fall morning, the corpse peeking out from under the windshield wiper — a sign, he thought, that his colleagues in the department saw him as a snitch. Detective Joseph Crystal had been in contact with prosecutors who eventually filed charges against his sergeant and another officer in connection with the beating of a drug suspect. The rat appeared a few weeks later. Mark Cheshire, a spokesman for State's Attorney's Gregg L. Bernstein, said that prosecutors and police investigated the incident as an act of witness intimidation but could not determine who was behind it. Attorneys for the two officers — whom a Baltimore jury convicted last week — said their clients had nothing to do with the rat. Sgt. Marinos Gialamas was found guilty of misconduct, while Officer Anthony Williams was convicted of assault and obstruction of justice, after he asked his girlfriend, Nakishia Epps, to lie to internal affairs investigators.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 13, 2014
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," and as the joke goes, "Poverty won. " Five decades after a blizzard of programs began descending on the American people, the poverty rate remains essentially unchanged. That's a little unfair. What counts as poverty today would not have seemed so impoverished 50 years ago, when many of the poor lived without electricity and were no strangers to hunger. Today, the biggest health problems of the poor are more likely to stem from obesity than anything approaching starvation.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore plans to give more than 9,000 households huge plastic trash cans on wheels - complete with tracking devices to prevent theft - under a pilot program that, if successful, could lead to a $10 million citywide expansion. The plan is aimed at fighting both litter and rats. The city's Board of Estimates is expected to approve the $578,000 test venture Wednesday. "Not having a trash can is actually a very big factor in rat infestation," said Valentina Ukwuoma, head of the Bureau of Solid Waste.
NEWS
By Dick Roraback and Dick Roraback,Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1995
They are loathsome, miasmal things, ranking down there with roaches, asps, journalists. Patricidal, matricidal, fratricidal, even homicidal, they live in sewers, spread disease, glory in slime, revel in raunch. And their teeth keep growing. But they can't help it.Suppose you were born a "Rat"? Andrzej Zaniewski supposes just that. Noting that rats "have found their most congenial living conditions among people," that come the revolution they may well inherit the Earth, Mr. Zaniewski has done nothing less than write a rat's autobiography.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
Shirley Gregory of Dundalk takes pride in her home, but unwelcome visitors have sometimes thwarted efforts to keep her yard tidy. When she and her husband had a brick patio laid, it wasn't long until the bricks were caving into the ground. Rats had burrowed in a nearby yard and dug tunnels into Gregory's property. "I was, like, shocked - that's what a rat did," said Gregory, president of the St. Helena Community Association. "Well, more than one rat. Quite a few rats. " Gregory was one of more than 100 people who turned out Saturday morning for a community cleanup.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Baltimore County's rat eradication program has treated more than 2,100 homes, and more efforts are planned for later this month, county officials said Thursday. Rodent infestations have become a common complaint in many county neighborhoods, and the "Rat Attack" program began in April 2012. Officials said two communities are scheduled to be treated this month: Riverview in Lansdowne, with treatment scheduled to begin the week of Feb. 11; and St. Helena in Dundalk, scheduled to begin the week of Feb. 25. The county has a 5-year, $750,000 contract with an exterminator to treat neighborhoods with rodent infestations.
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