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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 6, 1994
Moscow -- Valentin Rasputin lives deep in Russia, on the edge of Siberia, pressing a thousand years of conquering czars and toiling peasants close to his soul.Mr. Rasputin, a writer who is nearly as famous inside Russia as Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn is outside the country, holds dear the vision of an intensely spiritual nation, cleansed by centuries of suffering.As he writes and speaks about the kind of Russia he wants to emerge from the chill grasp of the Soviet years, he watches unhappily as Snickers candy bar wrappers flutter across the streets of Irkutsk, where he lives.
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By David Horsey | May 6, 2014
Monica Lewinsky is back in the news, a clear harbinger of the country's imminent return to a political world dominated by the Clintons.   Writing in the upcoming issue of "Vanity Fair," Ms. Lewinsky declares that she wants to take control of her own narrative. "It's time to burn the beret and bury the blue dress," she says. "I, myself, deeply regret what happened between me and President Clinton. Let me say it again: I. Myself. Deeply. Regret. What. Happened. "   Ms. Lewinsky affirms that the affair that led to Bill Clinton's impeachment was consensual.
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By Rose Dosti and Rose Dosti,Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1993
Patte Barham's "Peasant to Palace" (Romar Books) will make you want to sing "Ochi Chernye," kick up your legs in a kazatska and cook blini, kasha, stuffed cabbage and borscht dolloped with sour cream.It's not that these recipes are wonderfully different or exciting; it's the stories behind the recipes. They come from the daughter of Grigori Efimovich Rasputin, the Siberian visionary and healer who rose from humble farmer to adviser to the czar until his assassination during the Russian Revolution.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Sometime this winter, the world may know if the last of the Romanov bones have been found. The skeletal remains of two young people were unearthed last summer near the Ural Mountain city of Yekaterinburg, just a short distance from the site where most of the Russian royal family was discovered nearly 30 years ago, and genetic testing now under way should prove conclusive. If these are indeed the bones of Alexis and his sister Maria, they will be laid to rest, finally, in the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in St. Petersburg, alongside those of their parents, Nicholas and Alexandra, and their sisters Olga, Tatiana and Anastasia.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 2000
Putin. Rhymes with rootin' -- tootin' and Rasputin. Yeltsin went out on his timing and his terms, naming his successor, a feat attained by none of his predecessors. They must be reforming the Police Department by abolishing the rank of colonel. If this is winter, summer is going to be unbearable. Cheer up. It's 2000. How often does that happen?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
Finally, here's proof an animated film doesn't have to be Disney to be good."Anastasia," the new feature-length animation from 20th Century Fox about a princess whose destiny finds her, is every bit as good as most of its Disney predecessors and better than many. Filled with sparkling animation and appealing characters, it's a film that should keep the kids happy and their parents entertained -- even as it leaves historians with their mouths agape.The story opens in the waning days of Czarist Russia, as young Anastasia (voiced by Kirsten Dunst)
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 8, 1993
IRKUTSK, Russia -- There are 45 members in the Writers Union in this city of 600,000, which sounds like a pretty high novelist-per-capita ratio, but only one of them has a serious reputation that extends beyond this corner of eastern Siberia.And even he isn't doing much writing these days, afflicted as he is with a discouragement, a post-Soviet letdown, that borders on despair.He is Valentin Grigorievich Rasputin, a novelist and short-story writer whose world has been torn asunder by the collapse of the very system that once persecuted him.Mr.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Sometime this winter, the world may know if the last of the Romanov bones have been found. The skeletal remains of two young people were unearthed last summer near the Ural Mountain city of Yekaterinburg, just a short distance from the site where most of the Russian royal family was discovered nearly 30 years ago, and genetic testing now under way should prove conclusive. If these are indeed the bones of Alexis and his sister Maria, they will be laid to rest, finally, in the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in St. Petersburg, alongside those of their parents, Nicholas and Alexandra, and their sisters Olga, Tatiana and Anastasia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,BOSTON GLOBE | September 11, 2000
About 4 million of you purchased Microsoft Corp.'s Windows 98 operating system, and I'm still not sure why. That rather skimpy upgrade to Windows 95 was absurdly overpriced at $89. But lots of you paid it, so it's no surprise that Microsoft would try again, Thursday, with Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me. But this time it's different. There's a lower price - $59 for Windows 98 users, $89 for all others - and, this time, value for the money. Some rubbish, too. For a glimpse of Microsoft at its worst, there's the built-in Movie Maker software, Microsoft's response to Apple's marvelous iMovie video editing software, available free with all new Macintosh computers.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2001
PALAGINO, Russia - As the days turn warmer, the meadows here in central Russia are green and busy, full of people and cows, each person holding his cow by a rope as if walking a much-beloved pet. Nearly every villager has a cow, kept all winter in a shed attached to the house, and when the cows go outside for the first time in spring, they are easily frightened and likely to run off in panic. They need a steady, comforting hand until they grow accustomed once more to the long days of sunshine and freedom.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE *** It's not easy being Hellboy, what with the pointy tail, the horns that constantly need to be filed down and the comic books that try to make you look good, but never get the eyes right. But it's easy to like Hellboy the movie, especially if you're willing to accept the very comic book-ness of the whole endeavor - the oversized heroes, the chronic need to crack wise, the monstrous villains, the world that plays by its own rules. For in its outlandishness is this movie's very real charm, as writer-director Guillermo del Toro (Blade II)
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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Natalya, the owner of our very informal bed and breakfast in St. Petersburg, is apologetic. We've just arrived in the Russian city for a few days, and decided to stay as guests in her family's rambling apartment on the Moika Canal. The apartment is in one of the most fashionable parts of town -- a second-floor flat not far from St. Isaac's Cathedral and just down the block from the birthplace of novelist Vladimir Nabokov. More luridly, it's across the canal from the Yusupov Palace, where about a century ago the sinister mystic Rasputin -- who bewitched a czarina -- survived being stabbed, shot and beaten.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2001
PALAGINO, Russia - As the days turn warmer, the meadows here in central Russia are green and busy, full of people and cows, each person holding his cow by a rope as if walking a much-beloved pet. Nearly every villager has a cow, kept all winter in a shed attached to the house, and when the cows go outside for the first time in spring, they are easily frightened and likely to run off in panic. They need a steady, comforting hand until they grow accustomed once more to the long days of sunshine and freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,BOSTON GLOBE | September 11, 2000
About 4 million of you purchased Microsoft Corp.'s Windows 98 operating system, and I'm still not sure why. That rather skimpy upgrade to Windows 95 was absurdly overpriced at $89. But lots of you paid it, so it's no surprise that Microsoft would try again, Thursday, with Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me. But this time it's different. There's a lower price - $59 for Windows 98 users, $89 for all others - and, this time, value for the money. Some rubbish, too. For a glimpse of Microsoft at its worst, there's the built-in Movie Maker software, Microsoft's response to Apple's marvelous iMovie video editing software, available free with all new Macintosh computers.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 2000
Putin. Rhymes with rootin' -- tootin' and Rasputin. Yeltsin went out on his timing and his terms, naming his successor, a feat attained by none of his predecessors. They must be reforming the Police Department by abolishing the rank of colonel. If this is winter, summer is going to be unbearable. Cheer up. It's 2000. How often does that happen?
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 28, 1997
MOSCOW -- Boris A. Berezovsky's emergence as one of the power brokers of the new Russia was confirmed spectacularly in 1994. Splashy assassinations were just coming into vogue as the favored way to settle business disputes. Someone attached a bomb to Berezovsky's car and blew it up on a busy Moscow street. His driver was killed, but Berezovsky was unharmed.He was caught up in another explosion last week. This one was political. His hand reportedly lighted the fuse on the bombshell that blasted Anatoly B. Chubais' reputation to smithereens.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE *** It's not easy being Hellboy, what with the pointy tail, the horns that constantly need to be filed down and the comic books that try to make you look good, but never get the eyes right. But it's easy to like Hellboy the movie, especially if you're willing to accept the very comic book-ness of the whole endeavor - the oversized heroes, the chronic need to crack wise, the monstrous villains, the world that plays by its own rules. For in its outlandishness is this movie's very real charm, as writer-director Guillermo del Toro (Blade II)
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | September 10, 1996
NEW YORK -- The affair, or affairs, of the president's main man, Dick Morris, is the kind of thing that gives cynicism a good name. By name or ''Anonymous,'' you can't make this stuff up, which is why Random House, the publisher of ''Primary Colors,'' is apparently willing to hand over $2.5 million to Mr. Morris for his dirty little secrets.Therein lies a tale with Freudian undertones. Normally, my idea of psychiatry in American politics owes less to Austrian scholarship than to George Washington Plunkitt, the Tammany Hall philosopher best known for saying, ''I seen my opportunities and I took them.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
Finally, here's proof an animated film doesn't have to be Disney to be good."Anastasia," the new feature-length animation from 20th Century Fox about a princess whose destiny finds her, is every bit as good as most of its Disney predecessors and better than many. Filled with sparkling animation and appealing characters, it's a film that should keep the kids happy and their parents entertained -- even as it leaves historians with their mouths agape.The story opens in the waning days of Czarist Russia, as young Anastasia (voiced by Kirsten Dunst)
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | September 10, 1996
NEW YORK -- The affair, or affairs, of the president's main man, Dick Morris, is the kind of thing that gives cynicism a good name. By name or ''Anonymous,'' you can't make this stuff up, which is why Random House, the publisher of ''Primary Colors,'' is apparently willing to hand over $2.5 million to Mr. Morris for his dirty little secrets.Therein lies a tale with Freudian undertones. Normally, my idea of psychiatry in American politics owes less to Austrian scholarship than to George Washington Plunkitt, the Tammany Hall philosopher best known for saying, ''I seen my opportunities and I took them.
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