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NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 18, 2005
WHEN IT COMES TO THE HOLLY BALL, decking the halls is only the beginning. The fundraiser for the Hospice of Baltimore and Gilchrest Center for Hospice Care is known for its "only the best" atmosphere. "Pat Modell [the honorary co-chair with husband Art] makes sure this is over the top. The best band. The best food. Mink coats for the auction, for crying out loud!" exclaimed IBM vice president P.J. Mitchell. Unfortunately, Pat was feeling under the weather. So, son David Modell and wife Michel stood in for his parents, greeting guests alongside gala chairs Connie and Bill Pitcher.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 2005
Peggy Taliaferro from Cockeysville was hoping to find a recipe for the wonderful-tasting raspberry tart that her neighbor shared with her. The tart had been given to her neighbor by a friend from Germany and had a distinctly European look and flavor. Steffi Neumann of Baltimore sent in a recipe for a raspberry tart that she had brought with her when she moved to this country from Germany several years ago. The tart was one that her mother originally had made that she modified some. The crust is rich, buttery and cookielike and the filling is creamy and not too sweet, somewhat like a cheesecake.
NEWS
By Nichole Wright and Nichole Wright,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Trying to avoid the heat by not cooking this summer? Icebox Desserts (Harvard Common Press, 2005, $17.95) gives you recipes that require little time over the stove and absolutely no baking. Written by Lauren Chattman, with photography by Duane Winfield, Icebox Desserts features 100 recipes for cakes, pies, parfaits, mousses, puddings and other homemade desserts that can be made in minutes and set to chill while you complete the rest of your day's to-do list. Not only can these desserts be prepared in advance, they are fairly easy to whip up and require simple ingredients such as chocolate, cookies and cookie crumbs, eggs, fruit, ice cream and heavy cream.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 6, 2005
It's easy to think of raspberries as the brazen redheads of the berry family. Vividly colored, loudly flavored, raspberries can literally overwhelm - especially if pureed, reduced and sweetened into the sort of sauce that likes hanging around too many bad desserts on restaurant menus. But Miss Raspberry has a virtuous side. The fresh-picked fruit, still warmed by the sun, has a pure intensity of flavor that needs no adulteration. Raspberries come in three main varieties - red, golden and black - according to The New Food Lover's Companion, but their flavors are not appreciably different.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 22, 2005
Sheer, unadulterated luxury: That's raspberries and blackberries.asudfd Sweet, jewel-like globules bursting with flavor warm off the cane, they make fabulous jams, tarts, cobblers, muffins, salads and sauces. They're also rich in antioxidants. But they cost the moon. Usually sold by the half pint or even the gill (quarter pint), they often fetch as much as $5 for a handful. Yet they are relatively easy to grow here. "Everbearing raspberries, especially, are tailor-made for Maryland," says Susan Lynn, owner of Sand Hill Berries, a large berry producer in Mount Pleasant, Pa. "You can get two fruitings in a season."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
STATE DAIRY farmers, tobacco growers and others struggling to pay their bills might want to switch to the production of raspberries or something even more exotic, ginseng, to boost the viability of their farms. That's the suggestion from two recent University of Maryland studies that conclude that the two high-value crops could take the place of other, less-profitable products and significantly boost farm sales. They may also help young people move into farming by offsetting the high cost of land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
Some 550 B-more folks arrived at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel last weekend and immediately saw red. Maybe that's because they had come to the American Heart Association's Heart Ball, and red was the theme of the night. The color draped over tables, backdrops and even took the shape of big heart balloons scattered around the dance floor, but it also decorated many of the guests, starting with the evening's co-chairs. Greg Jarosinski sported a spiffy textured claret silk vest and tie with his tux, while wife Charlotte was a standout in ruby red. She wore a dishy layered chiffon strapless gown by Gilar.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 9, 2005
Bonny Doon "Loves Me" kit with Framboise ($26). OK, this might be better called Shameless Marketing Gimmick of the Week. For Valentine's Day, Bonny Doon has packaged its delicious Framboise along with certain other tryst-worthy paraphernalia (massage oil, candle, milk chocolate) in a gift box. The Framboise is like an electric jolt of pure Washington state raspberry -- sweet but balanced by bracing acidity. It would make lovely kir royale, but it seems a shame to dilute it -- even with champagne.
NEWS
June 23, 2004
Summer's fruit, raspberries and blackberries, are a healthful food choice. Not only are they low in fat and cholesterol and high in vitamin C, but a half-cup serving of raw berries has about the same fiber content as 3/4 cup of brown rice. Each raspberry or blackberry is a delicate cluster of 75 to 125 juicy drupelets, the individual fleshy lobes holding each seed of the berry. The color of raspberries should be medium to bright red; blackberries should be shiny and black. - Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2004
A Valentine's toast calls for something more than your everyday drink. Here's a suggestion: Invest in a bottle of Chambord, a black-raspberry liqueur known as the "liqueur royale" of France. Chambord is made from hand-picked black raspberries infused with cognac. Spices and other fruit - blackberry, currant and red raspberry - are added after the primary infusion. The result is a sweet, deep-purple liqueur that can be sipped alone with dessert, especially with a Valentine's Day favorite like dark chocolate.
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