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October 18, 1995
Annapolis District Court Judge Martha F. Rasin has been named administrative judge for District 7, which includes the Annapolis and Glen Burnie courts, effective Oct. 30.Robert F. Sweeney, chief judge of the District Court system, announced the appointment yesterday. Judge Rasin succeeds Judge Clayton Greene Jr., who was appointed Thursday to the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Judge Rasin has been a District Court judge for six years. She was chairman of the District Court Judicial Education Committee and a member of an ad hoc committee to implement changes in Maryland's domestic laws.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A 29-year-old man in custody on a charge of attempted robbery died in a nearby hospital after suffering a medical problem in a Baltimore courtroom Wednesday, the state corrections department confirmed. Medics took Ronnie A. Adams Jr. to Mercy Medical Center, where he died. An autopsy has been performed, according to the medical examiner's office, but investigators have not determined a cause of death. Footage captured by courtroom cameras shows Adams sitting on the courtroom's front bench shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday, awaiting a hearing as another case played out. He appeared to be talking to a woman sitting next to him. Adams suddenly listed to his right, heaving and snorting for breath, the tape shows.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
Gale E. Rasin, a Baltimore District Court judge for the past eight years, was appointed yesterday to the city's Circuit Court bench. Rasin, 52, will succeed Judge Thomas J. S. Waxter, Jr., who retired last month. In appointing Rasin, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said she will "further the best interests of the citizens of Baltimore City." Rasin, who was born in Baltimore, is familiar with the city's Circuit Court. She was a visiting judge handling misdemeanor trials this year from March until last month.
NEWS
By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Months before he allegedly killed a family friend in Harford County, eating his heart and parts of his brain, Alexander Kinyua was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and believed reptilian aliens were coming to destroy Earth, a judge said Wednesday. The revelations about the slow but steady deterioration of Kinyua's mind came as Baltimore Circuit Judge Gale E. Rasin accepted his plea of guilty but not criminally responsible on separate allegations that he attacked a fellow Morgan State University student with a baseball bat wrapped in barbed wire.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | February 17, 1992
If there's one thing Bacharach Rasin has learned over nearly 90 years in the sporting goods business, it's that survival means adapting to changing times.The hunting guns the store sold in the 1960s aregone. So are the fishing poles. Now, the Severna Park store, part ofthe Baltimore business established in 1904, has taken the last of the tennis rackets and badminton nets off the shelves.It seems that in the recession-plagued 1990s, fewer sports enthusiasts are shelling out money for luxuries like golf, tennis, squash, croquet and racquetball.
NEWS
September 18, 1996
MARTHA F. RASIN, named yesterday as chief of Maryland's District Courts, has run Anne Arundel's lower courts for less than a year. In that brief time, her talents as an administrator and judicial leader have been evident.Chief Judge Robert F. Sweeney, who reached the mandatory retirement age this week and stepped down as head of the District Court system, tells of visiting courthouses in recent months to say goodbye to judges and workers. In Anne Arundel County, when he noted that Judge Rasin was being mentioned as a potential successor, the response was unanimous: "Oh no, don't take her away from us!"
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
Rejecting a proposal that could save taxpayers as much as $7 million a year, Maryland's District Court chief said in a report to the General Assembly that she will not provide a judge for the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center courtroom.Instead, Judge Martha F. Rasin is recommending that the state use more video technology, place more pretrial inmates in home detention and get cases in court faster to save court and pretrial detention costs. "There's no need for the judge to go to the jail in order to achieve the objectives," Rasin said yesterday.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
Maryland's top District Court judge and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley exchanged harsh words yesterday, with the judge firing off an angry letter to him and the mayor calling her "obstructionist" on court reform. The comments deepened the divide between O'Malley and Chief Judge Martha F. Rasin over how to fix the city's beleaguered justice system. Rasin sent the letter to O'Malley after his remarks Feb. 11 before state legislators when he implored them to withhold $9 million from the state judiciary until they cooperate more on reform efforts.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
For more than a year, she had been considered a favorite to become chief judge of Maryland's District Court. And for 24 hours, she had known privately that the job was hers.But when the appointment was made public yesterday, Judge Martha F. Rasin acknowledged she was a little overwhelmed."I'm still reeling," she told reporters. "I know I've been handed something precious today."What Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy of the Court of Appeals handed her was control of the state's District Court -- the fast-moving, 100-judge system that gives most residents their only first-hand glimpse of local justice.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2005
Inside Martha F. Rasin's desk sits a worn manila folder marked "humor," filled with extraordinary examples of human behavior she's witnessed in the courtroom. After 16 years as a District Court judge - mostly on the bench in Annapolis, but including five years as the chief of the state District Court system - Rasin is slated to retire today. "Everything in here is the human side, not the legal side," she says of the folder, adding that as she cleans out files, this is one she'll keep.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
A 21-year-old man will spend 45 years in prison after a jury convicted him of second-degree murder for shooting his lifelong friend during an argument in August 2010, according to the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office. Isaiah Crowder, of the 1100 block of Brentwood Ave., was identified by a witness who picked his picture from a photo array, according to prosecutors. Police said Crowder shot 20-year-old Isaiah Gordon several times in the chest and lower body on Aug. 15, 2010, in the 400 block of East Chase St. Prosecutors did not say what the argument, which occurred about 4:15 a.m., was about.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
George Bacon Rasin Jr., a former Kent County circuit judge who led a movement to modernize juvenile justice in Maryland, died of congestive heart failure Friday at the Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson. He was 94. "Judge Rasin was widely known and respected for his integrity, knowledge of the law and absolute fairness," said retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Fader, who was a friend. "He was a man who ran a very tight ship. " Born in Worton in Kent County, he was a 1937 graduate of Washington College and earned his law degree from the University of Maryland School of Law. After enlisting in the Army in September 1941, he was assigned as a special agent to the Counter-Intelligence Corps in the Division of Military Intelligence.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Lavelva Merritt, who helped rob a Johns Hopkins researcher last year as her boyfriend murdered him, was sentenced to 30 years in prison Monday under a plea deal struck in May, though half the time was suspended, making her eligible for parole in roughly six years. The term is short compared with the life sentence her accomplice, John Wagner, received last month after an emotional trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, but it reflects her cooperation in the case, prosecutors said. "Without Ms. Merritt's testimony, I'm not sure whether we would have been successful" in convicting Wagner, Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein said Monday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Su | April 12, 2011
The woman sat handcuffed in front of Baltimore Circuit Judge Gale Rasin, freshly convicted of second-degree child abuse for beating her 8-year-old grandchild with a belt. She was 44, depressed, diagnosed with bipolar disorder and likely dealing with post-traumatic stress from being raped twice, according to a court medical report, yet she had received little treatment. Her father physically abused her growing up, and she, in turn, abused her own family, Rasin concluded during the hearing.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
D'Lana Simmons was found "not criminally responsible" on Tuesday for the beating death of her 66-year-old aunt last year, using the steering wheel locking device known as "The Club" as a murder weapon. "This was a clear case of somebody who was psychotic," Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Gale E. Rasin said, reading from a doctor's report on Simmons' mental status. Simmons struck her aunt, Cecelia Mitchell, approximately 56 times on the evening of Sept. 17, then called 911 for help "stating that she had hurt her aunt and that [the woman]
NEWS
By Peter Hermann peter.hermann@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
A few weeks ago, 80-year-old Daisy Dawson challenged Baltimore's top cop to a fight for calling her grandson an "idiot." It didn't matter that authorities say her grandson had shot two police officers, who then returned fire and killed him. "If I could meet the commissioner, I'd punch him in the mouth," she told me while sitting on a couch in her rowhouse, grabbing my arm for emphasis. Two years earlier, the commissioner spoke out against a man as a dangerous leader of a gang responsible for 10 killings in East Baltimore's Barclay neighborhood.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
The chief judge of Maryland's District Court defended her role in efforts to reform Baltimore's court system, labeling recent criticism by Mayor Martin O'Malley as "offensive." "The implication is that judges don't care about Baltimore City," a clearly piqued Judge Martha F. Rasin told a Senate subcommittee yesterday in Annapolis. "I take offense at that. We care about the city as much, if not more than other people." Rasin was responding to comments O'Malley has made in Annapolis and Baltimore in recent weeks questioning the judges' commitment to major reform.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Martha F. Rasin, an Anne Arundel County judge with a reputation for a strong legal mind and a patient manner, was named yesterday to head Maryland's District Court.In announcing his selection to one of the top three judicial jobs in the state, Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy of the Court of Appeals praised Rasin's energy and the skill she has shown administering Anne Arundel's District Court the past 11 months."I tell her I don't know when she can sleep with all the things she does," Murphy said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 30, 2010
Two teenage girls who told police that Lamont Davis mistakenly shot 5-year-old Raven Wyatt during a Baltimore street fight last summer were reluctant to repeat those statements in court Tuesday while the defendant and his supporters looked on. One of the girls changed her story completely, claiming police had pressured her into making a false identification, while the other had to be ordered to answer questions. The judge determined the former teen was lying and threatened the latter with contempt charges if she didn't comply, which she finally did after a long pause, describing Davis, 17, as the person she identified months ago. The judge ruled that the girls' identifications of Davis as the suspect can be admitted at trial.
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