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By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 25, 1991
By now, there have been more versions of "Rashomon" than there are folds in a piece of origami.The account of a rape and murder retold four different ways by four different sources, it originated as Japanese stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa. These were adapted into an Academy Award-winning movie by Akira Kurosawa in 1951. Eight years later "Rashomon" showed up on Broadway, scripted by Fay and Michael Kanin. And, hoping to cash in on a good thing, MGM remade it as a Western -- retitled "The Outrage" -- in 1964.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
A samurai's wife dazzles a bandit as she and her husband make their way through a deep wood. The brigand rapes her. Someone kills the samurai. (Maybe it was himself.) That's all we know for sure about the action in Rashomon, even after the director, Akira Kurosawa, stages it from four different perspectives. No director has matched his ability to develop a story by leaps and bounds while revealing irresolvable discrepancies. Is the bandit a bold combatant and ladies' man or a feral pig?
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 11, 1998
The Orpheum, Baltimore's premiere revival cinema in Fells Point, will pay tribute to the late, great Akira Kurosawa starting Monday with a weeklong double feature of two of the director's classic films: "Ikiru" (1952), about a dying man's last splendid gesture, and "Rashomon" (1951), the film Kurosawa is best-known for, about a murder in 12th-century Japan and the differing perceptions of its witnesses.He loves 'true crime'Director Joe Berlinger, who with Bruce Sinofsky created the award-winning documentaries "Brother's Keeper" and "Paradise Lost," was in Baltimore this week observing the production of "Homicide" in anticipation of landing a directing gig on the series later in the season.
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By Michael Sragow | July 10, 2009
Cheri *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) In this exquisite adaptation, Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend play two voluptuaries - an aging courtesan and the son of one of her friends. They don't realize how deeply they have fallen in love, and they break up without realizing what it will do to them. Pfeiffer provides a rare sensual depiction of maturity; director Stephen Frears conjures a world where anything goes as long as the environment stays stylish. Although it's been shockingly slighted by national media, Cheri is one of the best films of the year.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
A samurai's wife dazzles a bandit as she and her husband make their way through a deep wood. The brigand rapes her. Someone kills the samurai. (Maybe it was himself.) That's all we know for sure about the action in Rashomon, even after the director, Akira Kurosawa, stages it from four different perspectives. No director has matched his ability to develop a story by leaps and bounds while revealing irresolvable discrepancies. Is the bandit a bold combatant and ladies' man or a feral pig?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 22, 2008
Witnessing the same event from different points of view is at least as old as Akira Kurosawa's 1950 Rashomon. But it's a concept that gets beaten into the ground in Vantage Point, an overly gimmicky and fatally repetitive terrorist thriller that quickly wears out its welcome. Think of it as Rashomon for the video age, as audiences get to watch the same political assassination from what seems like a hundred different vantage points (the actual number is closer to a half-dozen) around the Spanish piazza where the shooting takes place.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | July 10, 2009
Cheri *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) In this exquisite adaptation, Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend play two voluptuaries - an aging courtesan and the son of one of her friends. They don't realize how deeply they have fallen in love, and they break up without realizing what it will do to them. Pfeiffer provides a rare sensual depiction of maturity; director Stephen Frears conjures a world where anything goes as long as the environment stays stylish. Although it's been shockingly slighted by national media, Cheri is one of the best films of the year.
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By New York Times | December 5, 1991
It's "Dallas." It's "Perry Mason." It's "Rashomon." With the Palm Beach partyland ambience, the Kennedy name and faces, the opening testimony of the woman known to television audiences as "the alleged victim," the trial of William K. Smith is proving to be a television spectacular.The most powerful hours came yesterday afternoon, with the appearance of the woman -- her face obscured by a big gray dot on Cable News Network and a blur by the Courtroom Television Network -- who gave in a direct, detailed and emotional way her account of what happened to her on the night of March 29. "The man was raping me," she said.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 10, 1995
The first of the big "foreign" movies to clue blinkered Western audiences into the idea that there was more to filmmaking than the Warner Brothers and that some of the world's best was going on in a defeated enemy's backyard was Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon," which blasted its way to a world audience in 1951.The second is not nearly so well-remembered, though in many ways it became more of a font for Japanese culture in America than "Rashomon." Among other things, it helped invent John Belushi.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 7, 2007
The Uses of Enchantment Heidi Julavits Doubleday / 368 pages / $24.95 Memory is a Rashomon experience - five people experiencing the same event will remember five different things, all of them true for that particular person at that particular time. Memory is one of the most elusive complements to who we are, implacably defining. Yet what we remember - how and for what reason - is inextricably dependent on who we are as individuals. A trauma victim might block memory altogether as a self-protective mechanism, incurring amnesia about the traumatic event.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 22, 2008
Witnessing the same event from different points of view is at least as old as Akira Kurosawa's 1950 Rashomon. But it's a concept that gets beaten into the ground in Vantage Point, an overly gimmicky and fatally repetitive terrorist thriller that quickly wears out its welcome. Think of it as Rashomon for the video age, as audiences get to watch the same political assassination from what seems like a hundred different vantage points (the actual number is closer to a half-dozen) around the Spanish piazza where the shooting takes place.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 7, 2007
The Uses of Enchantment Heidi Julavits Doubleday / 368 pages / $24.95 Memory is a Rashomon experience - five people experiencing the same event will remember five different things, all of them true for that particular person at that particular time. Memory is one of the most elusive complements to who we are, implacably defining. Yet what we remember - how and for what reason - is inextricably dependent on who we are as individuals. A trauma victim might block memory altogether as a self-protective mechanism, incurring amnesia about the traumatic event.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 11, 1998
The Orpheum, Baltimore's premiere revival cinema in Fells Point, will pay tribute to the late, great Akira Kurosawa starting Monday with a weeklong double feature of two of the director's classic films: "Ikiru" (1952), about a dying man's last splendid gesture, and "Rashomon" (1951), the film Kurosawa is best-known for, about a murder in 12th-century Japan and the differing perceptions of its witnesses.He loves 'true crime'Director Joe Berlinger, who with Bruce Sinofsky created the award-winning documentaries "Brother's Keeper" and "Paradise Lost," was in Baltimore this week observing the production of "Homicide" in anticipation of landing a directing gig on the series later in the season.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 10, 1995
The first of the big "foreign" movies to clue blinkered Western audiences into the idea that there was more to filmmaking than the Warner Brothers and that some of the world's best was going on in a defeated enemy's backyard was Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon," which blasted its way to a world audience in 1951.The second is not nearly so well-remembered, though in many ways it became more of a font for Japanese culture in America than "Rashomon." Among other things, it helped invent John Belushi.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 5, 1991
It's "Dallas." It's "Perry Mason." It's "Rashomon." With the Palm Beach partyland ambience, the Kennedy name and faces, the opening testimony of the woman known to television audiences as "the alleged victim," the trial of William K. Smith is proving to be a television spectacular.The most powerful hours came yesterday afternoon, with the appearance of the woman -- her face obscured by a big gray dot on Cable News Network and a blur by the Courtroom Television Network -- who gave in a direct, detailed and emotional way her account of what happened to her on the night of March 29. "The man was raping me," she said.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 25, 1991
By now, there have been more versions of "Rashomon" than there are folds in a piece of origami.The account of a rape and murder retold four different ways by four different sources, it originated as Japanese stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa. These were adapted into an Academy Award-winning movie by Akira Kurosawa in 1951. Eight years later "Rashomon" showed up on Broadway, scripted by Fay and Michael Kanin. And, hoping to cash in on a good thing, MGM remade it as a Western -- retitled "The Outrage" -- in 1964.
FEATURES
By Elaine Dutka and Elaine Dutka,Los Angeles Times | June 27, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Aubrey Rike is a former funeral parlor worker, the man who, in November 1963, put President Kennedy's slain body into the casket at Parkland Hospital. Today, he is a Dallas policeman who was recently hired as a consultant on Oliver Stone's latest project "JFK" -- a dramatic exploration of the assassination, which the director calls "the seminal event of our generation."At one point, Rike recalls, he pointed out a couple of minor factual errors in the way Stone was setting up a scene: Mrs. Kennedy had not been in the emergency room at a given time; her clothes were less blood-stained.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
A masterpiece of avant-garde filmmaking becomes a masterpiece of restoration with Manhatta. Film historian Bruce Posner spent almost four years on this inspired salvage job, using some of the same cutting-edge digital tools developed to restore better-known pictures such as Kurosawa's Rashomon. The labor paid off: This print renews the sharp, gritty luminosity of the 1921 collaboration between photographer Paul Strand and painter Charles Sheeler. It plays Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the National Gallery of Art, a perfect setting for a quintessential art film.
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