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By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Thirty-three years after the bravest act of his life, Alfred V. Rascon might finally get the recognition many feel he deserves.Legislation moving through Congress would allow the Vietnam War veteran, a resident of North Laurel in Howard County, to receive a Medal of Honor later this year for running into enemy fire and saving many of his fellow platoon members from certain death.It is a scene that has replayed in his head almost every day for more than half his life: the dead soldiers, the sound of machine guns, the blood, the pain.
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NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and By Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2000
During a parade and ceremony organized by Laurel's Hunters Creek Homeowners Association, Vietnam War hero Alfred V. Rascon was honored yesterday by some of those closest to him: his neighbors. "Freedom is not free," Rascon told them during brief remarks after a slow procession that carried him up Derby Drive in Hunters Creek to the community pond. Brightly dressed youngsters, holding American flags, listened quietly to his words. Parade participants, including honor guards from the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 451 from Dundalk and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, stood at solemn attention during the ceremony.
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NEWS
By Stephen Singer and Stephen Singer,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | December 6, 1995
Laurel resident Alfred Rascon describes a chance meeting with North Vietnamese snipers north of the Mekong Delta nearly 30 years ago as "10 minutes of pure hell."Now, looking back on that enemy attack in South Vietnam, Mr. Rascon said he believes the nearly mortal wounds he sustained were not life-changing.But several men who credit him with saving their lives have something very different to say. They are telling the U.S. government to give Mr. Rascon, 50, the recognition they say he deserves.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
A plan to name a post office in Savage after a Vietnam War hero was put on hold yesterday by the U.S. Senate, which decided not to act on the measure. After hearing objections from Savage residents, Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski asked that legislation to name the post for Medal of Honor recipient Alfred V. Rascon be pulled from consideration in the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs. The move temporarily halts a debate in which all sides agree that Rascon - awarded the Medal of Honor on Feb. 8 - is worthy of recognition.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It took 34 years, but Alfred V. Rascon has finally received his due. Yesterday, the North Laurel resident received the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award for valor, for his bravery on March 16, 1966 -- the day he jumped into enemy fire not once but several times to rescue fellow platoon members. At least six of Rascon's war comrades attended the afternoon ceremony at the White House. Before they flew in earlier this week, Rascon had not seen them for more than three decades, not since the day he risked his life to save theirs.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
A plan to name a post office in Savage after a Vietnam War hero was put on hold yesterday by the U.S. Senate, which decided not to act on the measure. After hearing objections from Savage residents, Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski asked that legislation to name the post for Medal of Honor recipient Alfred V. Rascon be pulled from consideration in the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs. The move temporarily halts a debate in which all sides agree that Rascon - awarded the Medal of Honor on Feb. 8 - is worthy of recognition.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and By Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2000
During a parade and ceremony organized by Laurel's Hunters Creek Homeowners Association, Vietnam War hero Alfred V. Rascon was honored yesterday by some of those closest to him: his neighbors. "Freedom is not free," Rascon told them during brief remarks after a slow procession that carried him up Derby Drive in Hunters Creek to the community pond. Brightly dressed youngsters, holding American flags, listened quietly to his words. Parade participants, including honor guards from the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 451 from Dundalk and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, stood at solemn attention during the ceremony.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
It was a moment that appeared to have nothing but happy endings attached to it. Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
It was a moment that appeared to have nothing but happy endings attached to it. Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
WHEN OLD MILL High School junior Christopher Osborn read an article on the front page of The Sun about a Vietnam veteran who had just received the congressional Medal of Honor, he knew he'd found the subject for his honors U.S. history class project. The article told the story of Army Spec. 4 Alfred Rascon, who had demonstrated exceptional valor in Southeast Asia in protecting men in his unit under heavy fire from the enemy. Students in Amanda Kirby's honors class study American history from the Civil War to the present; the spring semester is covering the period from 1919 to 2000.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
It was a moment that appeared to have nothing but happy endings attached to it. Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
It was a moment that appeared to have nothing but happy endings attached to it. Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
WHEN OLD MILL High School junior Christopher Osborn read an article on the front page of The Sun about a Vietnam veteran who had just received the congressional Medal of Honor, he knew he'd found the subject for his honors U.S. history class project. The article told the story of Army Spec. 4 Alfred Rascon, who had demonstrated exceptional valor in Southeast Asia in protecting men in his unit under heavy fire from the enemy. Students in Amanda Kirby's honors class study American history from the Civil War to the present; the spring semester is covering the period from 1919 to 2000.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 20, 2000
In this presidential election year, a soldier from North Laurel and a naval officer from Arizona are setting the tone. In their unique ways and on different stages, Alfred V. Rascon and Sen. John McCain, have what Americans crave: courage, humility, determination. In different ways, they started toward the year 2000 from the war in Vietnam and suddenly find themselves headed toward the White House -- to be honored for the sacrifices they made for comrades and for country. Mr. McCain, of course, is a Republican running for president.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It took 34 years, but Alfred V. Rascon has finally received his due. Yesterday, the North Laurel resident received the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award for valor, for his bravery on March 16, 1966 -- the day he jumped into enemy fire not once but several times to rescue fellow platoon members. At least six of Rascon's war comrades attended the afternoon ceremony at the White House. Before they flew in earlier this week, Rascon had not seen them for more than three decades, not since the day he risked his life to save theirs.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 20, 2000
In this presidential election year, a soldier from North Laurel and a naval officer from Arizona are setting the tone. In their unique ways and on different stages, Alfred V. Rascon and Sen. John McCain, have what Americans crave: courage, humility, determination. In different ways, they started toward the year 2000 from the war in Vietnam and suddenly find themselves headed toward the White House -- to be honored for the sacrifices they made for comrades and for country. Mr. McCain, of course, is a Republican running for president.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
Alfred Rascon, American hero, one of fewer than 150 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, sat in the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives with his wife, Carol, on July 17 and listened while elected officials from all corners of the country stood and applauded. They were cheering because a bill to name the Savage post office after Rascon was about to pass the House. It was a proud moment, said Carol Rascon, one she and her husband, a Vietnam veteran, could never have dreamed of. The same could not be said for a number of Savage residents.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Thirty-three years after the bravest act of his life, Alfred V. Rascon might finally get the recognition many feel he deserves.Legislation moving through Congress would allow the Vietnam War veteran, a resident of North Laurel in Howard County, to receive a Medal of Honor later this year for running into enemy fire and saving many of his fellow platoon members from certain death.It is a scene that has replayed in his head almost every day for more than half his life: the dead soldiers, the sound of machine guns, the blood, the pain.
NEWS
By Stephen Singer and Stephen Singer,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | December 6, 1995
Laurel resident Alfred Rascon describes a chance meeting with North Vietnamese snipers north of the Mekong Delta nearly 30 years ago as "10 minutes of pure hell."Now, looking back on that enemy attack in South Vietnam, Mr. Rascon said he believes the nearly mortal wounds he sustained were not life-changing.But several men who credit him with saving their lives have something very different to say. They are telling the U.S. government to give Mr. Rascon, 50, the recognition they say he deserves.
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