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NEWS
November 10, 2011
Many thanks to Jay Hancock for his interesting article about the Justice Department accusing Kernan Hospital of fraud in presenting a diagnosis of kwashiorkor in the billing for a number of patients ("Feds charge fraud in Kernan diagnoses," Nov. 8). I find it hard to believe that any medical personnel would be so stupid as to bill for patients with a wildly unlikely diagnosis of kwashiorkor. It seems more likely that a billing clerk entered an erroneous ICD (international classification of disease)
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The baseball consequences of Orioles first baseman Chris Davis' 25-game suspension for a second positive test for a banned amphetamine have been much discussed, but his suspension also prevented a Make-A-Wish Foundation participant from meeting Davis on Friday afternoon. According to the Virginian-Pilot , 5-year-old Kaden Abshire lives with a rare disease that can cause heart problems and skeletal abnormalities in the upper body. The disease is known as Holt-Oram syndrome. The Make-A-Wish Foundation gave Abshire's family six tickets to Friday's Orioles-Yankees game, and it was arranged for Kaden to meet Davis, according to the story.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
It's a dream Ida Heck never really expected to come true. Her family has raised about $1 million since 2005 for research into the rare disorder that afflicts her 8-year-old daughter, Jenna, resulting in cognitive deficits, seizures, long-lasting migraines, glaucoma in one eye and a red birthmark on the right side of her face. She's been driven by a fervent hope that the money would help finance a breakthrough. Yet she had her doubts: "So often you give and give and give and never hear of any findings.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Al DeCesaris turned his bicycle off Central Avenue and into the parking lot of Davidsonville Elementary School and pedaled about 100 yards before he was greeted by a band of loud, cheering fourth-graders carrying homemade signs and posters. DeCesaris, 40, an attorney who recently moved from Maryland to California, had spent the previous night with his parents in Riva, so he had had to ride just a few miles to the school for the rally Monday morning. That's far below his average ride of about 70 miles a day since Sept.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Al DeCesaris turned his bicycle off Central Avenue and into the parking lot of Davidsonville Elementary School and pedaled about 100 yards before he was greeted by a band of loud, cheering fourth-graders carrying homemade signs and posters. DeCesaris, 40, an attorney who recently moved from Maryland to California, had spent the previous night with his parents in Riva, so he had had to ride just a few miles to the school for the rally Monday morning. That's far below his average ride of about 70 miles a day since Sept.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND -- Five soldiers from an intelligence unit here were among an unknown number of Persian Gulf war veterans who contracted a rare disease and whom military doctors are still trying to track down 18 months after the desert conflict.The five soldiers in the Foreign Materiel Intelligence Battalion at the proving ground all have been successfully treated for the disease at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, a doctor there said yesterday.About 100 soldiers from the unit were deployed to the gulf region starting in the fall of 1990.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 4, 2012
Lindsey Duquette and her father, former Orioles executive Jim Duquette, have come through their transplant surgeries and are recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital, a spokesperson for the hospital said Monday. The father gave his daughter a kidney after her organs were destroyed by a rare disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis . Both are listed in fair condition, the hospital said.  There is no cure for the disease that is diagnosed in only 5,400 people a year.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 11, 2012
Four more Marylanders have developed fungal meningitis after receiving a steriod injection for back pain as a national outbreak has grown to 170 victims in several states. In Maryland, 13 people have been diagnosed with the rare disease and 1,500 could have been exposed to it. One person in the state has died, but health officials have released no specifics about the case. The outbreak has been linked to the steroid methylprednisolone acetate that was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The baseball consequences of Orioles first baseman Chris Davis' 25-game suspension for a second positive test for a banned amphetamine have been much discussed, but his suspension also prevented a Make-A-Wish Foundation participant from meeting Davis on Friday afternoon. According to the Virginian-Pilot , 5-year-old Kaden Abshire lives with a rare disease that can cause heart problems and skeletal abnormalities in the upper body. The disease is known as Holt-Oram syndrome. The Make-A-Wish Foundation gave Abshire's family six tickets to Friday's Orioles-Yankees game, and it was arranged for Kaden to meet Davis, according to the story.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 12, 2012
Two years ago, the Student Government Association at Francis Scott Key High School came up with a fundraising idea that has bumped and spiked its way into an annual tradition. The third annual charity volleyball tournament, "Spike Out Sarcoma" will be held on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the school. The tournament features two divisions, A and B, to allow players with all different skill levels - from beginner to pro - to participate and take on the challenge of raising awareness of sarcoma.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
It's a dream Ida Heck never really expected to come true. Her family has raised about $1 million since 2005 for research into the rare disorder that afflicts her 8-year-old daughter, Jenna, resulting in cognitive deficits, seizures, long-lasting migraines, glaucoma in one eye and a red birthmark on the right side of her face. She's been driven by a fervent hope that the money would help finance a breakthrough. Yet she had her doubts: "So often you give and give and give and never hear of any findings.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 11, 2012
Four more Marylanders have developed fungal meningitis after receiving a steriod injection for back pain as a national outbreak has grown to 170 victims in several states. In Maryland, 13 people have been diagnosed with the rare disease and 1,500 could have been exposed to it. One person in the state has died, but health officials have released no specifics about the case. The outbreak has been linked to the steroid methylprednisolone acetate that was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | June 11, 2012
Good Morning America host Robin Roberts told viewers in an emotional announcement this morning that she has the rare disorder myelodysplastic syndromes. She will soon get a bone marrow transplant from her older sister. It's probably fair to say that many people probably haven't heard of the disease that also goes by MDS. MDS is actually a group of disorders that cause the bone marrow to produce an inadequate number of healthy red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, according to the Mayo Clinic.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 4, 2012
Lindsey Duquette and her father, former Orioles executive Jim Duquette, have come through their transplant surgeries and are recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital, a spokesperson for the hospital said Monday. The father gave his daughter a kidney after her organs were destroyed by a rare disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis . Both are listed in fair condition, the hospital said.  There is no cure for the disease that is diagnosed in only 5,400 people a year.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 12, 2012
Two years ago, the Student Government Association at Francis Scott Key High School came up with a fundraising idea that has bumped and spiked its way into an annual tradition. The third annual charity volleyball tournament, "Spike Out Sarcoma" will be held on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the school. The tournament features two divisions, A and B, to allow players with all different skill levels - from beginner to pro - to participate and take on the challenge of raising awareness of sarcoma.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
Many thanks to Jay Hancock for his interesting article about the Justice Department accusing Kernan Hospital of fraud in presenting a diagnosis of kwashiorkor in the billing for a number of patients ("Feds charge fraud in Kernan diagnoses," Nov. 8). I find it hard to believe that any medical personnel would be so stupid as to bill for patients with a wildly unlikely diagnosis of kwashiorkor. It seems more likely that a billing clerk entered an erroneous ICD (international classification of disease)
NEWS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
Like many family reunions, yesterday's Mattingly family gathering in Solomons in Calvert County was a time for distant relatives to catch up with one another, to eat, drink and gab.But they also took out time for neurological exams and blood tests.For more than 300 years, the Mattinglys have been passing a debilitating muscular disorder from generation to generation, and a team of doctors took advantage of the reunion to try to learn more about their ailment and possibly to locate the gene that causes it.The rare disease has no formal name, although its symptoms and effects sometimes resemble those of other muscle diseases.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
On Saturday, 11-year-old Brantice Spencer was taken to Sinai Hospital with a bruised and swollen ankle. The next day, she was dead, the victim of a rare flesh-eating bacterial disease that infects up to 20 people a year in Maryland and kills one out of five. Medical officials said the case does not present a public danger but does illustrate how lethal this rare and toxic strain of streptococcus bacteria can be. Brantice Spencer died of complications from necrotizing fasciitis Sunday at Sinai Hospital, a spokeswoman for the state medical examiner's office said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A Baltimore County man won an $814,500 judgment in Baltimore County Circuit Court after claiming he contracted a rare lung disease known as "popcorn lung" from breathing a chemical used to make food taste buttery. A jury awarded Brian Hallock $5.4 million last month from Polarome International Inc., a New Jersey-based chemical manufacturer and distributor. But a judge said Friday she would reduce the amount because Maryland has a cap on non-economic damages, Hallock's attorney confirmed Tuesday.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
On Saturday, 11-year-old Brantice Spencer was taken to Sinai Hospital with a bruised and swollen ankle. The next day, she was dead, the victim of a rare flesh-eating bacterial disease that infects up to 20 people a year in Maryland and kills one out of five. Medical officials said the case does not present a public danger but does illustrate how lethal this rare and toxic strain of streptococcus bacteria can be. Brantice Spencer died of complications from necrotizing fasciitis Sunday at Sinai Hospital, a spokeswoman for the state medical examiner's office said.
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