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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 18, 1990
RYE, N.Y. -- A wood sandpiper in the marshes here coaxed Bill Tucker from bed at 5:30 a.m. one Saturday earlier this month to drive all the way from Washington. Keep in mind that this is someone who has already seen 2,500 birds, including the wood sandpiper."I've seen it before, but I haven't seen it this week," explained Mr. Tucker, his eyes trained on the long grasses where the sandpiper was probably hiding at high tide. "This is a very, very rare bird," he said.Rare, indeed. The wood sandpiper, which breeds in Scandinavia and northern Russia and winters in southern Africa and Australia, has not been seen in North America outside Alaska since 1907.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
DETROIT -- Delmon Young, whose pinch-hit double pushed the Orioles to victory in Game 2, received the start in left field in Game 3 against left-hander David Price. Young was expected in the lineup, but the fact he was playing left and Nelson Cruz was the designated hitter was a bit of a surprise. Young had started just 17 games in left this year, and only three in September. Manager Buck Showalter said Young's familiarity with left field at Comerica Park - he was a Tiger in 2011 and 2012 - played a part into the decision.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1997
IMAGINE if you had only eaten oatmeal and stumbled upon a four-star restaurant; if you thought people could only talk and then chanced to hear a great choir.Would you even be able fully to appreciate such a meal or a concert? Would you perhaps think such things abnormal, unnatural?Something like this happened last month when I found the magic forest during a kayak trip with friends along the upper, wooded reaches of an Eastern Shore river.It was purest chance we stopped for a break where we did, a tiny natural landing next to a huge bald cypress, one of many lining the stream.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
UPDATE -- Oct. 1 Jack McGlone wrote on his blog Monday that his brother Bill has been diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis , a rare condition causing inflammation in the brain, spinal cord and other areas of the nervous system. No exact cause is known for sarcoidosis, including the neurological variety that Bill McGlone has. Generally, doctors think neurosarcoidosis might have a genetic link, according to MedLine Plus , and they also suspect that bacterial or viral infections, or contact with certain types of chemicals or dust, could trigger it. In an update over the weekend, Jack said doctors at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia had "pretty much ruled out" cancer after a biopsy of a mass found on his brain during a CT scan.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | November 30, 1990
Maryland's Department of Natural Resources has completed a statewide review of the state's rare species and is proposing to revise the Threatened and Endangered Species list.Several years ago, in concert with the Chesapeake Bay protection effort, DNR reviewed the rare plants, animals and habitats of Maryland's tidewater counties. As a result of that review, in 1987 the Threatened and Endangered Species list was expanded from 33 species to a total of 342 species.Now, the rare species of Central and Western Maryland have been reviewed, and the department is proposing to add an 281 species, including the northern goshawk, the barking treefrog and the early coralroot orchid, to the list.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 15, 1991
The multiple-pitcher no-hitter certainly is a strange creature. The Orioles barely celebrated after their four-pitcher job Saturday at the Oakland Coliseum. A number of fans left before the final inning, bored. Yet what occurred was a baseball version of finding a million dollars lying in the street. A total freak.It was only the sixth time in major-league history that two or more pitchers had combined on a no-hitter. Six times in more than a century -- baseball happenstance just doesn't get much rarer than that.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1997
Their words emerge as slurred whispers. They often lose their balance and fall backward, grabbing for towel fixtures and smashing into walls. Their faces freeze in anguished expressions. Their eye muscles are so weak that they can't look down. One patient, Bill Scruggs, can't even see his grandchildren playing near his feet. They, in turn, shy away from him.The collective symptoms are so distinctive that diagnosis would seem easy. But this neurodegenerative disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, or PSP, is rare.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
An anxious woman was wandering near my house looking for her cat."It's a Somali cat," she said. "Very rare. Long ears."Never found the cat, but maybe I found something else: a new snobbery. Rare Somali cats.Somalia? I've been there, but don't recall ever seeing one of those fine cats. But those were difficult times, and maybe all the cats were eaten. That could be why they're so rare.Some people collect snobberies, make lists of them the way bird-watchers do with birds. Aldous Huxley, the late English writer, was one such.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
Michaela Odone, 61, whose efforts to develop a treatment for her son's rare disease inspired the movie "Lorenzo's Oil," died of lung cancer Saturday at her home in Fairfax, Va. She and her husband, Augusto, had no medical training but helped develop a combination of olive and rapeseed oils that they used to treat their son Lorenzo's rare degenerative brain disease, adrenoleukodystrophy.
FEATURES
October 19, 2007
Michael Sragow rates Michael Clayton an A, calling it a "scintillating and rare pop-culture creation, a thriller about character." What's your take on George Clooney's star turn as an attorney handling dirty work for a corporate firm? Join the discussion this weekend at baltimoresun.com/criticalmass.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
TORONTO - Much bigger goals lie ahead for the Orioles, and their final regular-season series here is less about winning games than about fine-tuning for the postseason. Still, the Orioles don't want to trudge to the postseason. Following their 4-2 loss to the Blue Jays at the Rogers Centre on Saturday, the Orioles have lost three consecutive games for the first time since being swept at Wrigley Field five weeks ago, and for just the second time since the All-Star break. The loss also ensured that the Orioles will finish the regular season with just their third road series loss since the break.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been showing a lot of love for the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the poem Francis Scott Key was inspired to write after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry. The BSO celebrated that anniversary on Sept. 13 during the nationally televised Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six, then kept the theme going for its annual gala, an all-American concert held Saturday night at Meyerhoff Hall. There was a good deal of novelty on the short program (in between dinner and dessert offered for premium gala-goers in a tent set up outside)
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent report by Election Integrity Maryland that there may be as many as 164 individuals who voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the 2012 election hasn't exactly caused the Maryland Board of Elections to press the panic button. There's a reason for that: The numbers don't prove fraud and more likely point to clerical error. That's not to suggest the Fairfax County Electoral Board should not seek criminal investigation, as officials announced last week, into 17 possible cases of duplicate voting in that Northern Virginia county - such due diligence is entirely appropriate - but the chances that such incidents will result in fraud convictions are slim.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
For only the second time since Rob Ambrose became Towson's coach, the Tigers will open the season with a game at home, welcoming Central Connecticut State to Johnny Unitas Stadium on Saturday at 6 p.m. The only other time in that span the Tigers played host to a season opener was in 2011, when they routed Morgan State, 42-3. Although Towson is just two games above .500 at home (15-13) under Ambrose, the program is 13-5 at Johnny Unitas Stadium in the past three years, and Ambrose said the team's recent success has had a noticeable impact in the stands.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
Nothing can justify the looting and violence by those who used the shooting of Michael Brown by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer as an opportunity to destroy the businesses and property of residents who had no hand in what happened and we should condemn the actions that have overshadowed the rights of citizens to peacefully protest. Yet the presence of military-style equipment in response to such demonstrations of civil disobedience should also be scrutinized. I spent more than 30 years in law enforcement, first as a Maryland state trooper, then as the public safety director in Prince George's County.
FEATURES
November 10, 2005
Tonight at 7:30, the Maryland Film Festival offers a rare movie going experience at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. San Francisco's Beth Custer Ensemble performs its new score for My Grandmother, a rarely seen, an archic 65-minute Russian movie that makes fun of the Soviet bureaucracy. Tickets are $8 to $10. Call the Maryland Film Festival office at 410-752-8083 for more details.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
Man, 53, accused of illegal logging A man accused of cutting down trees near a protected wetlands in Easton has been charged with illegal logging, a misdemeanor. Charles Peterson is accused of violating the state's nontidal wetlands and sediment control laws last summer. It was not immediately clear whether the 53-year-old owned the land where he cut the trees. The charge was announced yesterday by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who campaigned on a pledge to prosecute more environmental cases.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In its farcical "reinvention," Gannett's  Cincinnati Enquirer  is cutting loose Paul Clark.  Paul is a writer and editor of uncommon ability whom I have had the good fortune to number among my colleagues and whom I can recommend to you without reservation. He is one of the best.   If an employer with more perspicacity than The Enquirer 's management (you must number in the multitudes), would like to engage his services, he can be reached at pclark500@gmail.com.  If I were you, I would not delay.   
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Oliver Wendell Holmes the younger famously said in The Common Law , "The life of the law has not been logic; it has been experience. " What Mr. Justice Holmes said of the law is true a fortiori for language.  I was reminded afresh of this today when I came across a post at Jan Freeman's Throw Grammar From the Train  on one of the only . She points out that James Harbeck posted on the idiom at Sesquiotica  in 2011...
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