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By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2000
The Parkville woman accused of hiring a hit man to kill her daughter-in-law in Elkridge in late 1998 won a victory in court yesterday when a judge ruled that key evidence apparently linking her to the crime could not be used at her trial. Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled that statements implicating Emilia D. Raras, 63, on an informant's tape recording could be "devastating" because her attorneys would not be able to cross-examine the accused hit man, Ardale D. Tickles of Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
As cellist Allen Whear pointed out during his typically droll welcome to the audience Sunday afternoon at Towson University's Center for the Arts, there are two big 40th anniversary seasons this year: "Saturday Night Live" and Pro Musica Rara . The latter's milestone, as Whear also noted, is all the more remarkable considering that the early music movement -- playing period instruments, attempting to follow historic performance practices --...
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
A woman charged with murder in the grisly death of her Elkridge daughter-in-law in 1998 told police she hired a man to seek revenge but never intended to kill her."In fact, I thought he's not going to kill her," Emilia Raras, 63, told police detectives during her interrogation last August. "Because he told me he is just going to stone the house. As a revenge. For me."Her comments are from transcripts of a tape recording of the questioning played this week in Howard County Circuit Court during motions hearings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Pro Musica Rara , one of the unsung heroes of Baltimore's performing arts scene, will celebrate its 40th anniversary next season. That's remarkable on a whole lot of levels, starting with the fact that there weren't a lot people anywhere in the music world paying much attention to original instruments and historical informed performance practice four decades ago. It's still not a field that attracts across-the-board interest among classical...
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
A teary Emilia D. Raras pleaded yesterday for a reduction in the life-without-parole sentence she received for hiring a hit man in November 1998 to kill her Elkridge daughter-in-law - a woman she claimed to "love like a daughter." The 66-year-old grandmother and her lawyers asked a Howard County Circuit Court panel of three judges to suspend all but 10 years of the sentence. The review panel likely will file its decision within 30 days. If the judges reduce her sentence and she is paroled after serving the mandatory minimum of five years, Raras could be free before her 70th birthday.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
A Howard County Circuit Court jury was to resume deliberations today in the case of a 63-year-old woman charged in the slaying of her daughter-in-law in a murder-for-hire plot. The jury deliberated for about 2 1/2 hours yesterday after spending more than six hours listening to closing arguments in the case against Emilia Raras, who police and prosecutors say planned the brutal slaying of her daughter-in-law almost two years ago. Raras, of Parkville, was charged in August with first-degree murder, solicitation to commit first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
More than a year after the brutal killing of an Elkridge woman in her home, the trial of her Baltimore County mother-in-law on murder charges is scheduled to begin tomorrow in what authorities have called a murder-for-hire scheme that arose from a sense of rejection. Emilia D. Raras, 63, of Parkville is accused of paying a co-worker $3,000 to have her daughter-in-law killed -- a charge she denied during a tape-recorded police interrogation after her arrest in August. "In fact, I thought he's not going to kill her," Raras told detectives.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2000
The Parkville woman accused of hiring a hit man to kill her daughter-in-law in Elkridge in late 1998 won a victory in court yesterday when a judge ruled that key evidence apparently linking her to the crime could not be used at her trial. Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled that statements implicating Emilia D. Raras, 63, on an informant's tape recording could be "devastating" because her attorneys would not be able to cross-examine the accused hit man, Ardale D. Tickles of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Ardale D. Tickles will be punished for the murder of an Elkridge woman, but not as severely as the woman who hired him to kill her daughter-in-law. Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney sentenced Tickles yesterday to life in prison, but he did not impose the "without the possibility of parole" clause that prosecutors were seeking. Tickles, 20, will serve that sentence after completing the 25-year sentence he received in Baltimore County on unrelated attempted murder charges. The earliest Tickles could possibly be eligible for parole is 2024.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1998
Sara J. Williamson Raras, the 35-year-old Elkridge mother who was slain a week ago in her home, was remembered yesterday as an earthly angel, someone who would do anything for a friend.About 150 friends and co-workers from the National Security Agency attended a memorial Mass at St. Augustine's Catholic Church in Elkridge.The Rev. Gerard Bowen read their testimonials, eliciting tears and sniffling as he recalled a mother who leaves a 1-year-old son."She was just different, a whole different type of person," Bowen said after the service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
After less than a month, Pro Musica Rara is halfway through its 2013-14 season. So you'd better be paying attention or you might miss the other half, which would be a pity, since the early music group is in fine fettle these days. (The remaining concerts are in February and April.) Three weeks ago in Towson University's intimate recital hall, Pro Musica artistic director and cellist Allen Whear was joined by fine violinist Cynthia Roberts, elegant harpsichordist and brilliant recorder player Paul Lennhouts.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
During a 10-minute statement Tuesday in Howard County Circuit Court, Emilia D. Raras talked about how nearly a decade in jail has made her more religious and less angry. The 73-year-old Baltimore County grandmother, who was sentenced in 2000 to life without parole for enlisting a co-worker to kill her daughter-in-law in November 1998, said she didn't want to die in prison. "No person should die in prison," Raras said. In a hearing to ask retired Judge Dennis Sweeney to reconsider the sentence he had given her, Raras apologized for the act she committed and said she hoped others would forgive her. "Through the years in my solitude, I always think of Sara," Raras said of the woman she had had killed, Sara Williamson Raras.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | September 29, 2005
Way up near the top of the most inspired and profound works of classical music you'll find the suites for solo cello by Bach. With one instrument, he created whole worlds of sonic poetry. To kick off its 31st season of presenting early music on original instruments, Pro Musica Rara presents its artistic director, cellist Allen Whear, in a program containing two of Bach's cello suites, along with works by Gabrielli and Telemann. The program is 3:30 p.m. Sunday at Marikle Chapel, College of Notre Dame, 4701 N. Charles St. Tickets are $25, $20 for seniors and $10 for students.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 18, 2005
For 25 or so of its 30 years, Pro Musica Rara has presented an annual program dubbed SuperBach Sunday, originally offered as a counterpoint to the Super Bowl. It's no longer specifically timed to that event, but the name stuck. The 2005 concert, held Sunday at the ensemble's cozy home base, Towson Presbyterian Church, and devoted to works by Bach and Handel, scored one touchdown after another. Since cellist Allen Whear, a longtime performer with Pro Musica Rara, became the organization's artistic director last season, the overall quality has strengthened considerably.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 14, 2003
Just as familiar old paintings take on new life when centuries of grime are carefully removed from them, familiar old musical scores have a way of becoming fresher when centuries of performing traditions are erased. This process isn't easy. Players have to rethink just about everything, to learn their way around time-trapped instruments and historic concepts of music-making; listeners have to cope with different sounds and different manners of expression. Music long taken for granted is suddenly not so safe, comfortable and predictable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 9, 2003
The impulse to recapture the past is a strong one. It drives such things as re-creations of Civil War battles, which give participants a sense of how the real thing must have looked, felt, sounded. And it explains a musical phenomenon known, for better or worse, as the "authenticity movement" -- an attempt to replicate the way music of earlier times was first played. Like those modern-day Yankees and Rebels, the followers of this movement dig deep into the subject and re-learn how to do many things in order to make the time travel valid.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
In a surprise move and against his defense attorney's advice, a Baltimore man accused of killing an Elkridge woman in 1998 pleaded guilty yesterday to her murder in Howard County Circuit Court. Ardale D. Tickles, 20, said he was sure he wanted to plead guilty to first-degree murder in the slaying of Sara J. Williamson Raras, a 35-year-old mother, in November 1998. The trial was scheduled to begin yesterday with jury selection. "I'm entering a plea of guilty because I'm remorseful for what I did," Tickles said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
A Baltimore County woman accused of hiring a hit man to kill her daughter-in-law withdrew $2,500 in cash from her checking account a few days after the slaying, according to banking records disclosed during her trial yesterday. Howard County prosecutors then tried to link the withdrawal to the man accused of killing the 35-year-old Elkridge mother, contending the cash was deposited into his bank account within weeks of the killing on Nov. 14, 1998. The defense attorney for Emilia D. Raras, 63, of Parkville attacked the alleged connection, and an investigator with the state's attorneys office acknowledged that he could not say whether Raras gave cash to Ardale D. Tickles, the man accused in the killing of Sara J. Williamson Raras of Meadowfield Court.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 13, 2002
A panel of three Howard County Circuit Court judges has rejected a Baltimore County woman's request for a reduction in the life-without-parole sentence she received for her role in the 1998 death of her Elkridge daughter-in-law. In a brief written opinion issued Monday, Judges Raymond J. Kane Jr., Diane O. Leasure and Lenore R. Gelfman said the arguments offered by Emilia D. Raras and her lawyers - that all levels of the judicial process involved in her case "got it wrong" - "are not within the scope of our review."
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