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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
Seattle does it. Miami's on board. Pittsburgh, too. So why not consider "bus rapid transit" in Baltimore, asks state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan. He wants to take a serious look at running rapid buses along some of the region's proposed rail routes. Buses are cheaper than rail cars, and they could get rolling a lot faster. "It's a rail car with rubber wheels," Flanagan said, who is so enamored of the idea that he has begun calling the region's rail plan a transit plan.
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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
The Traffic Group, a White Marsh-based transportation planning firm, has been chosen by Montgomery County officials to prepare a conceptual blueprint and cost estimate for a bus rapid transit system to serve the state's most populous jurisdiction and the home of Maryland's worst traffic congestion. The system would consist of a 150-mile network of express lanes stretching from Gaithersburg to Silver Spring that would be capable of handling 207,000 passengers daily - which would make it one of the largest bus rapid transit systems in the nation.
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NEWS
June 18, 2010
I was disappointed to read in The Baltimore Sun that former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has come out in strong opposition to the proposed Red Line and Purple Line light rail projects ("Ehrlich's stance opposing light rail could backfire," June 17). I was a public transportation official for more than 40 years and directly involved in mass transit projects in Baltimore, Boston, Stockholm and Washington. I believe that the Red Line, which I am more familiar with, is an urgently needed transportation improvement for the Baltimore Metropolitan Area.
NEWS
June 18, 2010
I was disappointed to read in The Baltimore Sun that former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has come out in strong opposition to the proposed Red Line and Purple Line light rail projects ("Ehrlich's stance opposing light rail could backfire," June 17). I was a public transportation official for more than 40 years and directly involved in mass transit projects in Baltimore, Boston, Stockholm and Washington. I believe that the Red Line, which I am more familiar with, is an urgently needed transportation improvement for the Baltimore Metropolitan Area.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 14, 1994
"There are two seasons in Chicago," the person is saying. "Winter and Construction."I don't respond."That's a joke," the person says.I remain silent. I know what is coming.The person wants me to fly to Chicago and give a speech. Giving speeches has become controversial ever since it was revealed that some reporters have been getting big bucks from groups that have their own political agendas.[I would like to take this opportunity to say that my recent speech to the Poison Gas Council titled "Mustard Gas: What's All the Fuss About?"
NEWS
August 19, 2007
It turns out, the infamous "pants suit" has legs - which is to say, it isn't going away anytime soon. The whole thing began in 2005 when a Washington, D.C., dry cleaners lost the pants to a suit that had been brought in for alteration. The customer, Roy L. Pearson, said the owners of Custom Cleaners had not lived up to their posted sign promising "Satisfaction Guaranteed," and he sued them - for $65 million, later dropped to $54 million plus about $400 an hour in attorney's fees for defending himself.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | April 4, 1993
From The Sun April 4-10, 1843April 4: There are now three trains a day from Baltimore to Washington City. One at 2 o'clock a.m., one at 9 a.m., and one at 4 p.m.April 5: A subscriber wishes us to call the attention of the proper authorities to a collection of bad boys who are nightly in the habit of gathering at and near the corner of Mulberry and Pearl streets, and amuse themselves by making mud balls and throwing them at passers by.April 8: Several articles...
NEWS
September 4, 2008
Curbing carbon boosts economy, public health Maryland can only win by promptly implementing the recommendations of the state Commission on Climate Change ("State climate panel urges action," Aug 27). When labor unions and manufacturers raise objections to such suggestions, they fail to understand their own best interests. Far from driving industry out of the state and costing us jobs, moves to make our state more green are an essential economic survival strategy. Failing to enact the measures proposed by the commission is what could drive industry and jobs away, as doing so could enable other states to beat Maryland to the new markets for clean energy and efficient technology.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
Recent news that a Baltimore Red Line with all the proverbial bells and whistles may not be eligible for federal funding should come as no surprise. The Federal Transit Administration funding formula is notoriously stingy, and an east-west light rail line with much tunneling would be pricey. But that should in no way diminish community support for the Red Line. Indeed, it only underscores the need to be realistic about its design and, in the long term, to change federal policy to reflect 21st-century needs.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
The need for an improved regional transportation network --including a significant expansion of rapid transit -- looms as perhaps the biggest challenge to the growth expected in Maryland's economy from realignment of the nation's military bases, state and county officials said yesterday. Two issues stand in the way of improving the transportation system, officials at a regional conference in Ellicott City said: a cost that could run into the billions of dollars and public resistance to mass transit projects.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Long meetings filled with debates over policy. Redistricting battles. Student and employee grievances. Oh, and the budget process. The three people elected to the Howard County school board Tuesday will need to hit the ground running, Chairman Frank Aquino said. Fortunately for newcomers, there is an orientation that can help them be ready for their first official meeting Dec. 1. There is a "laundry list" of steps to take, aimed at helping new members make a seamless transition, Aquino said.
NEWS
September 4, 2008
Curbing carbon boosts economy, public health Maryland can only win by promptly implementing the recommendations of the state Commission on Climate Change ("State climate panel urges action," Aug 27). When labor unions and manufacturers raise objections to such suggestions, they fail to understand their own best interests. Far from driving industry out of the state and costing us jobs, moves to make our state more green are an essential economic survival strategy. Failing to enact the measures proposed by the commission is what could drive industry and jobs away, as doing so could enable other states to beat Maryland to the new markets for clean energy and efficient technology.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
Recent news that a Baltimore Red Line with all the proverbial bells and whistles may not be eligible for federal funding should come as no surprise. The Federal Transit Administration funding formula is notoriously stingy, and an east-west light rail line with much tunneling would be pricey. But that should in no way diminish community support for the Red Line. Indeed, it only underscores the need to be realistic about its design and, in the long term, to change federal policy to reflect 21st-century needs.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
It turns out, the infamous "pants suit" has legs - which is to say, it isn't going away anytime soon. The whole thing began in 2005 when a Washington, D.C., dry cleaners lost the pants to a suit that had been brought in for alteration. The customer, Roy L. Pearson, said the owners of Custom Cleaners had not lived up to their posted sign promising "Satisfaction Guaranteed," and he sued them - for $65 million, later dropped to $54 million plus about $400 an hour in attorney's fees for defending himself.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter Rail or bus. Bridge or ferries. Tolls or taxes. These and other issues affecting how Marylanders get around could be at stake in this year's contest between Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Mayor Martin O'Malley | November 3, 2006
In a governor's race dominated by the issues of education, crime and the economy, transportation so far has taken a back seat. But in a state that slogs through some of the worst traffic congestion in the country, moving people and goods remains one of the most important functions of state government. "A lot of key decisions are scheduled to be made in the next four years, and the outcome of those decisions could influence jobs and neighborhood investments and growth patterns for generations to come," said Dan Pontious, policy director for Baltimore's Citizens Planning and Housing Association.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
The need for an improved regional transportation network --including a significant expansion of rapid transit -- looms as perhaps the biggest challenge to the growth expected in Maryland's economy from realignment of the nation's military bases, state and county officials said yesterday. Two issues stand in the way of improving the transportation system, officials at a regional conference in Ellicott City said: a cost that could run into the billions of dollars and public resistance to mass transit projects.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter Rail or bus. Bridge or ferries. Tolls or taxes. These and other issues affecting how Marylanders get around could be at stake in this year's contest between Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Mayor Martin O'Malley | November 3, 2006
In a governor's race dominated by the issues of education, crime and the economy, transportation so far has taken a back seat. But in a state that slogs through some of the worst traffic congestion in the country, moving people and goods remains one of the most important functions of state government. "A lot of key decisions are scheduled to be made in the next four years, and the outcome of those decisions could influence jobs and neighborhood investments and growth patterns for generations to come," said Dan Pontious, policy director for Baltimore's Citizens Planning and Housing Association.
NEWS
By Robert L. Flanagan | July 7, 2003
TRANSIT ADVOCATES in the Baltimore region say they have a "visionary plan" for Charm City's transportation future: a subway system just like Washington's. It's an attractive vision, to be sure, one bound to elicit oohs and aahs from the public and the press. They'll show you a map with subway lines in five colors and photo illustrations of sleek, graffiti-free rail cars, whooshing soundlessly through tunnels under the city. What they don't show you is the invoice. It's for tens of billions of dollars.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
PORTLAND, ORE. -- From what she'd seen in Maryland, Wanda Wallace didn't have a high opinion of light rail. But the community leader from West Baltimore loved the transit line she found here. "They're leaps and bound ahead of us in terms of technology, in terms of signage, in terms of having a system that's user-friendly," she said. Wallace, representing the Allendale Community Association, was part of a delegation of Baltimore leaders who traveled to Oregon's largest city to learn how it developed its highly regarded MAX Light Rail service.
NEWS
By Robert L. Flanagan | July 7, 2003
TRANSIT ADVOCATES in the Baltimore region say they have a "visionary plan" for Charm City's transportation future: a subway system just like Washington's. It's an attractive vision, to be sure, one bound to elicit oohs and aahs from the public and the press. They'll show you a map with subway lines in five colors and photo illustrations of sleek, graffiti-free rail cars, whooshing soundlessly through tunnels under the city. What they don't show you is the invoice. It's for tens of billions of dollars.
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