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December 3, 2009
MERRY MART: If you don't make it to Holiday Heap on Saturday, you have another chance this weekend to shop for clever crafties and great gifties at The Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. You'll find everything from wall decor to soap. Admission is free. Go to creativealliance.org. CANTICLE SINGERS: The women's choir known as the Canticle Singers of Baltimore has been a welcome addition to the cultural scene for more than two decades. The ensemble's holiday concert, featuring Benjamin Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," will be performed at 5:30 p.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St. Tickets are $12 and $15. Call 410-374-9312.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2009
MERRY MART: If you don't make it to Holiday Heap on Saturday, you have another chance this weekend to shop for clever crafties and great gifties at The Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. You'll find everything from wall decor to soap. Admission is free. Go to creativealliance.org. CANTICLE SINGERS: The women's choir known as the Canticle Singers of Baltimore has been a welcome addition to the cultural scene for more than two decades. The ensemble's holiday concert, featuring Benjamin Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," will be performed at 5:30 p.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St. Tickets are $12 and $15. Call 410-374-9312.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Musical time travel seems to thrill Raphael Saadiq. On his last album, 2004's overlooked Ray Ray, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer went back to the blaxploitation era. The loose concept album positioned him as a funky fly guy whose songs seduced the ladies and enlightened everybody. But for the sound of The Way I See It, his new CD due out next month, Saadiq goes way back to soul's golden era, circa 1967. Everything - the eschewal of modern instruments, the high-pitched, reverberating mix of the music - recalls the urban sounds floating from transistor radios during the LBJ era. "With this record, I was going to the movies, you know," says the artist, who headlines Black Cat in Washington on Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Throughout 2008, as America was transfixed by a historical and climactic presidential election and a scary economic meltdown, pop music became blurry. Styles morphed more than they did the year before as mainstream acts dissolved sonic barriers. Easy signifiers of certain genres all but disappeared. So-called indie rock, which generally prided itself on a ragged, warts-and-all style musicianship, was suffused with inventive textures (a layering of strings, for instance) and compelling melodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 4, 2004
When he's creating music, Raphael Saadiq often escapes to another time for inspiration -- that era of randy Pam Grier movies, tacky velvet paintings and marigold shag carpet. But the singer-songwriter-producer brings a modern, hip-hop-informed sensibility to his '70s-inspired formula: the rich brew of deep bass lines, layered guitars, syncopated strings. And there's always a quirky sense of humor in the lyrics. Raphael Saadiq as Ray Ray, the follow-up to the singer's 2002 Grammy-nominated solo debut Instant Vintage, extends the artist's obsession with the funk era. On the album, which hit stores this month, Saadiq reveals another character.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 4, 2008
Q-Tip [Universal Motown] **** cds Within six years, Jonathan Davis, better known as celebrated rapper Q-Tip, bounced around five different labels. And although he recorded a wealth of material, none of it saw official release. Only one album, 2002's Kamaal the Abstract, came close to actually seeing the light of CD stores. But at the last minute, Arista, Q-Tip's label at the time, decided to shelve the project after promos had been sent out. It's a shame, because the album was a pointed and wickedly ambitious mash-up of soul-jazz, Beatles-inflected pop and New York-style hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Q-Tip wants to put "new flavor in your ear." In the process, he hopes you feel the love, too. The rapper's engaging new album, The Renaissance, glows with loving, downright sunny sentiments often unheard these days in mainstream hip-hop - or any other urban style, for that matter. With all the talk of hope surrounding the historic presidential election of Barack Obama, it seems appropriate that such an album landed in stores on Election Day. "I felt the music needed to have a reawakening of the spirit," says Q-Tip, who plays the 9:30 Club in Washington on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Throughout 2008, as America was transfixed by a historical and climactic presidential election and a scary economic meltdown, pop music became blurry. Styles morphed more than they did the year before as mainstream acts dissolved sonic barriers. Easy signifiers of certain genres all but disappeared. So-called indie rock, which generally prided itself on a ragged, warts-and-all style musicianship, was suffused with inventive textures (a layering of strings, for instance) and compelling melodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NATHAN PITTS | February 19, 2009
Just announced Jennifer Hudson Lyric Opera House on April 4. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Lil Wayne 1st Mariner Arena on March 20. Tickets on sale at 10 a.m. tomorrow. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Less Than Jake Rams Head Live on March 13. 410-244-1131 or ramsheadlive.com. Gladys Knight DAR Constitution Hall in Washington on March 28. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Still available Christopher Cross The Birchmere in Alexandria, Va., on March 9. 703-549-7500 or birchmere.
NEWS
February 10, 2009
Series NCIS: : Gibbs (Mark Harmon) confronts demons from his past when he finds a cryptic message waiting for him at a crime scene. (8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) The Biggest Loser: : A balancing competition will bring the winner a 24-hour visit from a loved one. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) 90210: : Naomi (AnnaLynne McCord) is smitten with a bartender who's surrounded by mystery. (8 p.m., WNUV-Channel 54) American Idol: : The Hollywood round continues. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) How the Earth Was Made: : The new series premieres with a trip along the San Andreas Fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Q-Tip wants to put "new flavor in your ear." In the process, he hopes you feel the love, too. The rapper's engaging new album, The Renaissance, glows with loving, downright sunny sentiments often unheard these days in mainstream hip-hop - or any other urban style, for that matter. With all the talk of hope surrounding the historic presidential election of Barack Obama, it seems appropriate that such an album landed in stores on Election Day. "I felt the music needed to have a reawakening of the spirit," says Q-Tip, who plays the 9:30 Club in Washington on Sunday.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 4, 2008
Q-Tip [Universal Motown] **** cds Within six years, Jonathan Davis, better known as celebrated rapper Q-Tip, bounced around five different labels. And although he recorded a wealth of material, none of it saw official release. Only one album, 2002's Kamaal the Abstract, came close to actually seeing the light of CD stores. But at the last minute, Arista, Q-Tip's label at the time, decided to shelve the project after promos had been sent out. It's a shame, because the album was a pointed and wickedly ambitious mash-up of soul-jazz, Beatles-inflected pop and New York-style hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Musical time travel seems to thrill Raphael Saadiq. On his last album, 2004's overlooked Ray Ray, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer went back to the blaxploitation era. The loose concept album positioned him as a funky fly guy whose songs seduced the ladies and enlightened everybody. But for the sound of The Way I See It, his new CD due out next month, Saadiq goes way back to soul's golden era, circa 1967. Everything - the eschewal of modern instruments, the high-pitched, reverberating mix of the music - recalls the urban sounds floating from transistor radios during the LBJ era. "With this record, I was going to the movies, you know," says the artist, who headlines Black Cat in Washington on Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 4, 2004
When he's creating music, Raphael Saadiq often escapes to another time for inspiration -- that era of randy Pam Grier movies, tacky velvet paintings and marigold shag carpet. But the singer-songwriter-producer brings a modern, hip-hop-informed sensibility to his '70s-inspired formula: the rich brew of deep bass lines, layered guitars, syncopated strings. And there's always a quirky sense of humor in the lyrics. Raphael Saadiq as Ray Ray, the follow-up to the singer's 2002 Grammy-nominated solo debut Instant Vintage, extends the artist's obsession with the funk era. On the album, which hit stores this month, Saadiq reveals another character.
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