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Raoul Middleman

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 22, 2010
Margaret J. Guchemand, a voice teacher who had been chairman of the music department at then-Essex Community College, died Feb. 15 of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 70. Margaret Josephine Kelso, the daughter of a civil engineer and a homemaker, was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn. After graduating from Bearden High School in 1957, she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1961 from the University of Tennessee.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
John E. Sparks, an artist, educator and a nationally known printmaker who developed and chaired the department of printmaking at the Maryland Institute College of Art for nearly 40 years, died Aug. 2 of prostate cancer and pneumonia at Meritus Health Center in Hagerstown. The former longtime Charles Village resident was 69. "I respected John a great deal. He had, how shall I put it, a lot of attitude and I'm sure he rubbed some people the wrong way, but he was an artist," said artist Raoul Middleman.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
John E. Sparks, an artist, educator and a nationally known printmaker who developed and chaired the department of printmaking at the Maryland Institute College of Art for nearly 40 years, died Aug. 2 of prostate cancer and pneumonia at Meritus Health Center in Hagerstown. The former longtime Charles Village resident was 69. "I respected John a great deal. He had, how shall I put it, a lot of attitude and I'm sure he rubbed some people the wrong way, but he was an artist," said artist Raoul Middleman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Two cool summertime art exhibits located in different neighborhoods, and very much in different financial brackets, provide welcome diversion from the heat. C. Grimaldis Gallery in Mount Vernon offers a show that brings together several notable artists who have long been associated with the gallery, including Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake and Anthony Caro. The price tags: $1,500 to $90,000. School 33 in Federal Hill has the diverse "Magically Suspicious" show on one floor, and two spaces devoted to individual artists upstairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Two cool summertime art exhibits located in different neighborhoods, and very much in different financial brackets, provide welcome diversion from the heat. C. Grimaldis Gallery in Mount Vernon offers a show that brings together several notable artists who have long been associated with the gallery, including Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake and Anthony Caro. The price tags: $1,500 to $90,000. School 33 in Federal Hill has the diverse "Magically Suspicious" show on one floor, and two spaces devoted to individual artists upstairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 2, 1992
I usually dislike artists' statements -- they tend to be pompous and/or silly -- but Raoul Middleman's statement accompanying his current show at Artshowcase is different. It's almost chatty, and begins in a self-deprecatory way:"In a dream I had, my eldest son asked what kind of artist I was, to which I replied that I thought I was an expressionist. 'You're no expressionist, Daddy; you're an impatientist.' "That's true. Encountering a Middleman show, one admires the nervous energy of his brush stroke, but wishes the artist had the patience and discipline to keep it from simply going sloppy over and over, at least partly spoiling the effect of what might otherwise be dynamic, dramatic pictures.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
When Raoul Middleman paints a portrait, his brush strokes have so much expressionistic fervor that the subjects have no choice but to come alive on the canvas. When he paints a landscape, he brings the same vigor to his depictions of Baltimore's gritty industrial heritage.During his long career as a Baltimore artist, Middleman has sought out people and places that are not pretty -- at least by conventional standards. His take on Baltimore will not be found in tourist brochures.As the 56-year-old artist himself pungently points out in a statement for his one-man show at the Jewish Community Center: "I like to paint people who are on the fringe, disenfranchised, alienated, not surrounded by a bunch of bourgeois bric-a-brac."
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 4, 1996
I am a little late. It's 10 minutes after 1 o'clock when I ring the bells -- one electric, one pulled on a string -- at Raoul Middleman's studio a block and a half north of the Guilford Avenue bridge. I have come to have my portrait painted.A painter of landscapes, portraits and narrative paintings, Raoul Middleman is one of the best-known artists working in Baltimore. He has decided to do a series of portraits of people associated with art in Baltimore -- Grace Hartigan, Joyce Scott, Gary Vikan, etc. -- and has asked me to be one of his subjects.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1996
Want to spend quality time with the movers and shakers of the Baltimore art world? Painter Raoul Middleman gives you the chance through an exhibit of his portraits of museum directors, artists, curators and other prominent figures on the local scene.Among the notable aspects of his show at the Steven Scott Gallery is that it's surely the only time you'll ever find these arts advocates rendered speechless.Mr. Middleman's expressive brushwork speaks for them. Wielding a brush as if he were an Old West gunslinger, Mr. Middleman executes fast and furious portraits in which the sitter's personality usually comes across with uncanny incisiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 22, 2010
Margaret J. Guchemand, a voice teacher who had been chairman of the music department at then-Essex Community College, died Feb. 15 of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 70. Margaret Josephine Kelso, the daughter of a civil engineer and a homemaker, was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn. After graduating from Bearden High School in 1957, she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1961 from the University of Tennessee.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | April 6, 1999
Cezanne, an early father of modernism, advised artists to look to nature for inspiration. Modernism has come and gone, but the representation of nature -- albeit in unconventional, sometimes quirky ways -- remains a touchstone for those who have followed.Modernism began by reinventing the primitive. Painters gradually abandoned the realistic deep space of Renaissance perspective for the flattened planes of Asian art and the iconic figures of African sculpture.In the postmodern era, the primitive has been replaced by the quotidian.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 1997
When Raoul Middleman talks about painting, it reminds you of the way he paints.He's standing in the middle of his landscape show at the Steven Scott gallery, in front of his painting called "The Quarry," and he says:"Ireelikawayaliyitoserocks."What he's saying is, "I really liked the way that light hit those rocks," but that's not the way it comes out. It comes out all in a rush, with every word gobbling up part of what's next to it in Middleman's hurry to get the thought out. It's a combination of energy, quickness of mind and the urgent need for self-expression.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1996
Want to spend quality time with the movers and shakers of the Baltimore art world? Painter Raoul Middleman gives you the chance through an exhibit of his portraits of museum directors, artists, curators and other prominent figures on the local scene.Among the notable aspects of his show at the Steven Scott Gallery is that it's surely the only time you'll ever find these arts advocates rendered speechless.Mr. Middleman's expressive brushwork speaks for them. Wielding a brush as if he were an Old West gunslinger, Mr. Middleman executes fast and furious portraits in which the sitter's personality usually comes across with uncanny incisiveness.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 4, 1996
I am a little late. It's 10 minutes after 1 o'clock when I ring the bells -- one electric, one pulled on a string -- at Raoul Middleman's studio a block and a half north of the Guilford Avenue bridge. I have come to have my portrait painted.A painter of landscapes, portraits and narrative paintings, Raoul Middleman is one of the best-known artists working in Baltimore. He has decided to do a series of portraits of people associated with art in Baltimore -- Grace Hartigan, Joyce Scott, Gary Vikan, etc. -- and has asked me to be one of his subjects.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | April 6, 1999
Cezanne, an early father of modernism, advised artists to look to nature for inspiration. Modernism has come and gone, but the representation of nature -- albeit in unconventional, sometimes quirky ways -- remains a touchstone for those who have followed.Modernism began by reinventing the primitive. Painters gradually abandoned the realistic deep space of Renaissance perspective for the flattened planes of Asian art and the iconic figures of African sculpture.In the postmodern era, the primitive has been replaced by the quotidian.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 1997
When Raoul Middleman talks about painting, it reminds you of the way he paints.He's standing in the middle of his landscape show at the Steven Scott gallery, in front of his painting called "The Quarry," and he says:"Ireelikawayaliyitoserocks."What he's saying is, "I really liked the way that light hit those rocks," but that's not the way it comes out. It comes out all in a rush, with every word gobbling up part of what's next to it in Middleman's hurry to get the thought out. It's a combination of energy, quickness of mind and the urgent need for self-expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 2, 1992
I usually dislike artists' statements -- they tend to be pompous and/or silly -- but Raoul Middleman's statement accompanying his current show at Artshowcase is different. It's almost chatty, and begins in a self-deprecatory way:"In a dream I had, my eldest son asked what kind of artist I was, to which I replied that I thought I was an expressionist. 'You're no expressionist, Daddy; you're an impatientist.' "That's true. Encountering a Middleman show, one admires the nervous energy of his brush stroke, but wishes the artist had the patience and discipline to keep it from simply going sloppy over and over, at least partly spoiling the effect of what might otherwise be dynamic, dramatic pictures.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
When Raoul Middleman paints a portrait, his brush strokes have so much expressionistic fervor that the subjects have no choice but to come alive on the canvas. When he paints a landscape, he brings the same vigor to his depictions of Baltimore's gritty industrial heritage.During his long career as a Baltimore artist, Middleman has sought out people and places that are not pretty -- at least by conventional standards. His take on Baltimore will not be found in tourist brochures.As the 56-year-old artist himself pungently points out in a statement for his one-man show at the Jewish Community Center: "I like to paint people who are on the fringe, disenfranchised, alienated, not surrounded by a bunch of bourgeois bric-a-brac."
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