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NEWS
September 17, 1997
The Frederick County Board of Appeals is being asked to reconsider its approval of the Taneytown Rod and Gun Club's shooting ranges on a Frederick County farm.The three-member board granted zoning approval in August for the club to build rifle, pistol and trap shooting ranges on a farm in the 12000 block of Shoemaker Road near Harney.The club spent five years seeking approval for the ranges, despite opposition from neighbors who have argued that Shoemaker Road was inadequate for increased traffic and that the gun ranges would alter a quiet, rural lifestyle.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 15, 2014
The strategy President Barack Obama has laid out to "degrade and ultimately destroy" the new Middle East terrorist peril reveals him as a man divided between combating the immediate threat and persevering in his determination get this country off "a perpetual war footing. " In clinging to his insistence that there will be no more American "boots on the ground," he is committing himself and the nation to a military compromise that adheres more to public preference than to the comprehensive approach dictated by the Pentagon.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Problems with the rifle range are not the only ones at Maryland's new $4.6 million police firearms training center in Sykesville, where more fingers have been pointed than shots fired. The state and the contractor at the center, EnviroServe Inc. of Sykesville, are in a dispute over who is responsible for what EnviroServe claims are $2.4 million in cost overruns, most of them associated with four pistol ranges. The state's Department of General Services (DGS), which oversaw construction of the firearms training center, says EnviroServe worked too slowly.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Police Department plans to renovate its indoor shooting range in Lutherville after being cited for exposing employees to high concentrations of lead. Maryland Occupational Safety and Health issued the citations in May after finding that the ventilation system operated poorly and other protections against lead exposure, such as regular disposal of combustible waste, were not in place. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said the department is evaluating plans to improve ventilation.
NEWS
July 21, 1997
Taneytown Rod and Gun Club will get another chance to make its case for shooting ranges on a 128-acre club-owned farm in Frederick County.The county's Board of Zoning Appeals, which turned down the club's request for trap pits and 50-and 150-meter skeet, rifle and pistol ranges last spring, has agreed to reconsider its decision at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Winchester Hall, 12 E. Church St., Frederick.Neighborhood residents have fought the club's request for shooting ranges on the farm, which is in the 12000 block of Shoemaker Road near Harney.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
On its third try, Taneytown Rod and Gun Club won permission to build rifle, pistol and trap shooting ranges on a Frederick County farm near Harney.The Frederick County Board of Zoning Appeals voted 2-1 Tuesday night to allow the shooting ranges on the club's 128-acre farm in the 12000 block of Shoemaker Road. The vote came after vocal, occasionally emotional, opposition from the club's neighbors during a three-hour public hearing.The club has been trying for five years to build shooting ranges on the farm it bought after selling its former range to Taneytown in 1991.
NEWS
June 27, 1997
Taneytown Rod and Gun Club will get another chance to make its case for firing ranges on its 128-acre farm in Frederick County.The Frederick County Board of Zoning Appeals, which turned down the request for trap pits and 50- and 150-meter skeet, rifle and pistol ranges last month, has agreed to reconsider its decision.The reconsideration will be held at 7 p.m. July 22 in Winchester Hall, 12 E. Church St., Frederick.Neighbors have fought the club's request for shooting ranges on the farm in the 12000 block of Shoemaker Road near Harney.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
Should churches be allowed cemeteries in residential zones? Should builders be allowed temporary sales offices in new developments? And should indoor shooting ranges be subject to the same distance requirements as outdoor ranges?Those questions are now before the county's Zoning Ordinance Oversight Committee.The Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission yesterday referred the proposed amendments to the technical committee for review and recommendation.Solveig Smith, Carroll's zoning administrator, said the cemetery request has come from a Finksburg pastor who wants permission to have three burial sites on church grounds.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
For the second time in five years, the Frederick County Board of Zoning Appeals has turned down Taneytown Rod & Gun Club's request to build firing ranges on a 128-acre farm in the 1200 block of Shoemaker Road near Harney.Neighbors opposed to the ranges argued during a three-hour hearing Tuesday night that their quality of rural life would be harmed and that Shoemaker Road is not adequate to handle increased traffic.The board, after closely questioning club President Godfrey "Dick" Miller, concluded that the capacity of the existing clubhouse and the planned shooting ranges would exceed 100 people.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Problems with the rifle range are not the only ones at Maryland's new $4.6 million police firearms training center in Sykesville, where more fingers have been pointed than shots fired. The state and the contractor at the center, EnviroServe Inc. of Sykesville, are in a dispute over who is responsible for what EnviroServe claims are $2.4 million in cost overruns, most of them associated with four pistol ranges. The state's Department of General Services (DGS), which oversaw construction of the firearms training center, says EnviroServe worked too slowly.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
A little-noticed and highly technical Supreme Court decision is opening the way for dozens of federal inmates from Maryland to seek reduced sentences — even though trial judges found they had violent criminal pasts. For some, the high court decision has already meant that sentences of 15 years and more have been cut substantially. One inmate, for example, saw his sentence reduced from 15 years to about six years; he was released in February. The legal challenges are the latest turn in an ongoing debate over the fairness of long federal prison sentences — a weapon frequently used in Baltimore to combat crime.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | May 30, 2014
Inside linebacker C.J. Mosley had some tough classes at the University of Alabama, but nothing as hard as learning about playing in the National Football League. Mosley has been on a crash course since the Ravens drafted him in the first-round (17th overall) of the NFL draft a few weeks ago. It is eat and sleep football all day, every day. Mosley, though, is finally getting settled. "The biggest adjustment is adjusting to football all day," Mosley said. "You're here at 6 in the morning.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
The National Aquarium in Baltimore is asking for feedback as it considers whether to keep the eight Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in its care or move them to an ocean-side sanctuary. The Inner Harbor anchor institution revealed plans this week to evaluate its future role as a conservation organization - including whether to keep the marine mammals - through a process it's calling BLUEprint. The aquarium launched the website aqua.org/future for the public to submit opinions.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | April 21, 2014
The Ravens will go over numerous scenarios in the days leading up to the NFL draft that might play out in the first round, but they probably won't make a move until they are on the clock with the No. 17 overall pick. And they could trade with another team and move back in the first round. The consensus among most top team executives and so-called experts is that this is a deep draft, and that most of the top 10 to 15 players will be gone when it's time for the Ravens to choose. So unless a highly rated player falls to the Ravens, general manager Ozzie Newsome could decide to move back to a slot between Nos. 24 and 28 in the first round.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For the children visiting the Pearlstone Center's sustainable farm Sunday, the chickens and baby goats might have been the main event. But supporters of the Family Farm Day said they hope that interaction will be the start of a deeper connection with faith and the environment. "It touches something deeper than themselves," said Sharon Goldman Wallach, 38, who attended the day with her father and two young daughters. "It's a double hit. " The Pearlstone Center event was one of the kickoff activities for Baltimore Green Week, a weeklong affair launched in 2004 as part of a Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1999
ORLANDO -- After a morning at Walt Disney World, Ibrahim Dueb, a Saudi tourist, drives straight out International Drive and parks his car between Universal Studios Florida and the Wet N' Wild water park. He enters neither.Instead, he walks past the Continental Plaza Hotel and into another one of this city's popular tourist attractions: the Shooting Sports gun range. "Please," he says to a counterman who presents a list of safety instructions translated into Arabic, "I want to shoot Clint Eastwood's gun."
FEATURES
December 11, 2007
A night of eclectic sound Go see Bob Schneider at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. Schneider is a versatile performer whose acoustic sound ranges from country to rap. The 7:30 p.m. show is $23.50. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadtavern.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Seven artists, whose works span experimental musical instruments and genealogy-inspired sculpture, are the finalists in the 2014 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The prize, which provides the winner with a $25,000 fellowship award that will help them further develop and create their work, is named after civic leader Walter Sondheim and his wife, Janet. The artists are: •Lauren Adams, whose paintings, drawings, prints and other works explore power, politics and labor.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Toward the end of a blistering set on a recent Friday night, Adam Marans, lead singer of the Baltimore sludgy punk foursome Big Christ, took a rare breather to dedicate the next song, “Boogie Nights,” to the deceased actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. A collective smile hit the room of roughly 25. And then came the boom, a glorious cacophony of Marans' full-throated yells, relentless cymbal crashing, staccato palm muting on guitar and the bass' punishing low end. The 25-minute performance was loud, brutal and a lot of fun. It was also just a regular Friday night at the Gold Bar, another smart and solid addition to an emerging Station North bar scene that already includes the Windup Space, Beatnik, Club K and next-door neighbor The Crown.
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