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By GARRY WILLS | February 23, 1994
When I interviewed Randy Shilts six months ago, he still looked healthy -- he even offered to drive me back to my hotel. But he could not fly to premieres of his TV movie ''And the Band Played On.'' One lung had already collapsed, and doctors feared the other would collapse in the rarer atmosphere of an airplane.This week Mr. Shilts died, at 42, one of the best journalists of his or any other generation. Among other things that lend it horror, AIDS is a great brain drain.Mr. Shilts came of a conservative family.
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NEWS
By Rob Morse | February 25, 1994
San Francisco -- THREE hours before Randy Shilts' memorial service here Tuesday the Rev. Fred Phelps, frequent-flier bigot, was still on the plane from Topeka, Kan., with his "Fags Burn in Hell" signs in the overhead compartments.Three of Randy's friends were sitting in the Rev. Cecil Williams' office in Glide Memorial United Methodist Church, taking a break from setting up the service."We figured that Randy is the one who called the ol' Rev.," said Linda Alband, who was Randy's assistant for many years and had known him since his Oregon days in the mid-1970s.
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NEWS
By Rob Morse | February 25, 1994
San Francisco -- THREE hours before Randy Shilts' memorial service here Tuesday the Rev. Fred Phelps, frequent-flier bigot, was still on the plane from Topeka, Kan., with his "Fags Burn in Hell" signs in the overhead compartments.Three of Randy's friends were sitting in the Rev. Cecil Williams' office in Glide Memorial United Methodist Church, taking a break from setting up the service."We figured that Randy is the one who called the ol' Rev.," said Linda Alband, who was Randy's assistant for many years and had known him since his Oregon days in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | February 23, 1994
When I interviewed Randy Shilts six months ago, he still looked healthy -- he even offered to drive me back to my hotel. But he could not fly to premieres of his TV movie ''And the Band Played On.'' One lung had already collapsed, and doctors feared the other would collapse in the rarer atmosphere of an airplane.This week Mr. Shilts died, at 42, one of the best journalists of his or any other generation. Among other things that lend it horror, AIDS is a great brain drain.Mr. Shilts came of a conservative family.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 13, 1993
Chicago. -- Larry Kramer is best known as the founder of Act-Up, the group that dramatizes AIDS desperation by means of street-theater antics. The organization's initials stand for AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power.Kramer is considered an extremist, the kind of gay militant who creates more antagonism than understanding, because of the aggressive style of Act-Up. There is no doubting his abrasiveness. He is good at making enemies. But he is far from an extremist in most of his views.Kramer was not only the first gay activist in New York to recognize the scale of the AIDS crisis, but also the first to make an issue of gay response to that crisis.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | May 3, 1993
Chicago. -- Whatever happened to Tom Dooley? In the 1950s his name was on every superpatriot's lips. He was the anti-communist Cardinal Spellman offered as a model to Catholic children. As a Navy doctor in French Vietnam, he championed the nuns who had educated the colonials of that French holding.His book, ''Deliver Us From Evil,'' alerted the nation to the godless ways of the native insurgents trying to overthrow the colonial power. He set the stage for our intervention in Vietnam. As a favorite of the cardinals and the nuns, he had special clout among President Kennedy's early constituents.
FEATURES
By Mike Wilson and Mike Wilson,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 5, 1993
For 200 years, Americans have sent their sons to war with these macho parting words: "It'll make a man out of you." Perry Watkins was inducted into the U.S. Army in 1968, during the Vietnam mess. It made a woman out of him.As Randy Shilts tells it in his timely and instructive book, "Conduct Unbecoming," Mr. Watkins proclaimed from Day One that he was homosexual -- not so he could avoid the draft, but because it was true. The Army broke its own rules and took him anyway. There was a war on, and the brass didn't much care what a soldier did off-duty.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1994
Randy Shilts, the author of best-selling books on AIDS and gay issues and a newspaper reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, died yesterday at his home in Guerneville, Calif. He was 42 and also had a home in San Francisco.The cause was AIDS, said Linda Alband, his assistant.Mr. Shilts was one of the first journalists to recognize AIDS as an important national issue. In the early 1980s he persuaded the Chronicle to let him report on AIDS full-time.His work resulted in the widely acclaimed 1987 book "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic."
NEWS
By Randy Shilts | December 20, 1991
ANYONE who has a heart can sympathize with the anguish of the Bergalis family over the recent death of their daughter Kimberly.Like so many other victims of AIDS, Kimberly died too young.No AIDS sufferer in the United States dominated the AIDS policy debate this year the way Bergalis did. But the story of Bergalis and her family became largely a tale of anger.The Bergalises are angry that their daughter was infected with this horrible virus. I understand that. I'm angry too that I've had to watch half of my friends waste away and die miserable deaths from this disease.
NEWS
June 24, 2006
Aaron Spelling, 83, a onetime movie bit Aaron Spelling, 83, a onetime movie bit player who created a number of hit series, including the vintage Charlie's Angels and Dynasty, as well as Beverly Hills 90210 and Melrose Place, died yesterday at his home in Los Angeles after suffering a stroke June 18, according to publicist Kevin Sasaki. Mr. Spelling's other hit series included Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Burke's Law, The Mod Squad, Starsky and Hutch, T.J. Hooker, Matt Houston, Hart to Hart and Hotel.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to the Sun | March 28, 1994
If you have a feeling of deja vu watching TV tonight, it may be because of what you're vu-ing. All three telemovies shown tonight on the major networks have been televised before: Fox's is a rerun, NBC's was shown last year by HBO, and ABC's was shown by Lifetime.* "Dead Silence" (8-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This telemovie was shown three years ago on Fox, when so few people watched the network that this barely counts as a rerun. But it's not worth watching, once or twice. Its plot (vacationing students cover up a fatal accident involving their car)
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 8, 1994
Chicago. -- Blunt and cantankerous Barry Goldwater is back in the news. The famous right-wing candidate of 1964 is telling interviewers that he supports gay rights, even though homosexuality remains a mystery to him.Senator Goldwater's gay grandson, Ty Ross, says that he is close to the old man, even though he laughs at the way Mr. Goldwater says, '' 'You people need to stand up for your rights' -- one of those 'you people' kind of things.''Senator Goldwater, a military man and a longtime defender of a strong military, supported President Clinton's effort to remove the ban from gay participation in the nation's defense.
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